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Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences

This department provides majors in the fields of behavioral sciences (criminal justice, psychology, and social work) and social sciences (government, history, and social sciences).  All majors fall under the umbrella of the department, but are indicated within one of the two domains, behavioral or social.  

Within the domain of the behavioral sciences, students preparing for graduate studies or careers in psychology, social work, or criminal justice should pursue majors in Psychology, Social Work, or Criminal Justice respectively. Further, the Biopsychology minor is intended for those interested in pursuing careers that involve the interfacing of psychology and the medical field. These include careers in psychiatry, neuropsychology, and behavioral medicine. Students preparing for people-oriented careers in business, communication, education, government, church ministry, or missions should consider a behavioral sciences field as a second major/minor.

The A.A. program in Human Services is for students who wish to enter a paraprofessional job in human services after two years of college. An interdisciplinary A.A. in Social Sciences with an emphasis in psychology or sociology is also available.

The department also offers a major in Human Services in an accelerated format in Adult Studies for students 25 years of age and older who have already completed 64 semester credits from an accredited college or university. This program is described in greater detail in the Adult Studies section of this catalog.

Within the domain of the Social Sciences, these fields make a systematic, comprehensive study of human beings, by using methodologies that encourage the understanding and appreciation of the multicultural heritage of humankind and integrates these approaches within a Christian worldview. To foster a study of humankind's historic cultures, values, social relations, and political organizations, the social sciences offer courses in American and world civilization, government, economics, geography, anthropology, and international/multicultural studies.

Those who pursue study in one or more of the social science disciplines may enter the fields of business, economics, industrial and labor relations, international relations, public administration, administration in industrial or service organizations, law, education, government and civil service, and journalism.

Specialized programs include a 2-week internship in Washington, D.C., potential overseas internship opportunities, and internships for departmental majors in museums, archives, government departments, and law offices.

Behavioral Science Courses (BEHV)

100. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR (1)

This introductory course helps new Evangel students acclimatize themselves to the University. As such, it serves as an intellectual and practical orientation to the challenges and opportunities of University life and learning. Students are introduced to Evangelís Christ-centered, integrational, exploratory, and global ethos. They learn to use and participate in campus-wide and department-specific offerings. They build relationships within departmental contexts as well as across campus. They are encouraged to understand that they are being prepared not only for a career but for life.

210. STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (3)

Introduction to measures of central tendency, analysis of variance, probability, correlation, regression, and non-parametric statistics essential for research and interpreting professional literature from the field of the behavioral and social sciences. Students describe and make inferences regarding statistical information and present and interpret data in an ethical manner. Meets Core Curriculum Math Proficiency requirement. Offered fall, spring and summer semesters.

296. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR (2)

This course is designed for the educational and professional options available to students majoring in the behavioral sciences. Opportunities for self-assessment are offered to help the student determine if he/she wishes to pursue a career in the behavioral sciences. Students are given exposure to professionals in the community from various orientations of the discipline. Also, an application of the style manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) will be presented.

Criminal Justice

The mission, goals, and objectives of the Criminal Justice Program include:

Mission
The Criminal Justice Program at Evangel University prepares graduates for competent service within the criminal justice field and for success in graduate school.  Utilizing a Christian worldview, students are given tools to practice in a broad spectrum of employment within the field to include law enforcement, corrections, investigations, juvenile justice, and probation and parole systems.

Program Goals and Objectives:
Goal #1: Equip students with knowledge and understanding of the history and operation of various components in the criminal justice system.

Objective 1: State the role and funcion of law enforcement agencies and officers.
Objective 2: Articulate the many components of the United States' court system.
Objective 3: Analyze the corrections system in the United States, to include local, state, and federal agencies.

Goal #2: Prepare students to think critically and develop an understanding of the various criminological theories.

Objective 1: Analyze and critique why people commit crimes.
Objective 2: Explain how to treat citizens when they commit crimes.
Objective 3: Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to explain individual and societal development and behavior.

Goal #3: Equip students with the knowledge and skills to competently apply principles of criminal investigation.

Objective 1: Students will effectively identify, collect, and process evidence.
Objective 2: Students will learn and demonstrate effective interviewing techniques.
Objective 3: Students will learn and demonstrate effective techniques of interrogation.
Objective 4: Illustrate effective communication skills through report writing.
Objective 5: Analyze and apply techniques of crime scene reconstruction.

Goal #4: Prepare students to demonstrate an understanding of concepts and theories of police administration.

Objective 1: Articulate the function within a standard unit of a criminal justice organization.
Objective 2: Recite the legal and political aspects of law enforcement administration.

Goal #5: Develop within students the understanding and application of significant law enforcement values, ethics, and behavior

Objective 1: Demonstrate discretion in working with the public.
Objective 2: Understand and demonstrate professional and appropriate behavior in regards to civil liability.

Goal #6: Equip students with knowledge and history of state and federal laws.

Objective 1: Articulate issues of constitutional law.
Objective 2:  Articulate Supreme Court decisions governing the activities of law enforcement officers pertaining to arrest, search and seizure, and detention.

Goal #7: Prepare students to function competently and ethically within a criminal justice setting.

Objective 1: Demonstrate a practical knowledge through experience of a criminal justice agency of the student’s choice.
Objective 2: Apply knowledge and skills within a practicum field setting.
Objective 3: Act in a manner consistent with Christian values and professional ethics.

Goal #8: Prepare students to work in the criminal justice field using a Christian worldview as their lens.

Objective 1: Apply a Christian worldview to all aspects of course work and field experiences
Objective 2:  Articulate the role that Christians have within every facet of the criminal justice system. 

Students who complete a degree in Criminal Justice may anticipate opportunities in this multi-faceted field, including law enforcement, corrections, juvenile justice, probation and parole, and the court system. A major in Criminal Justice may also assist in career advancement and graduate school preparation.

A Criminal Justice major consists of 35 hours, including CJST 241, 296, 334, 353, 372, 422, 423, and 498, and SOCI 111 and 223. The balance of hours are selected from the following electives: CJST 335, 336, and 342, PSYC 234, 235, 236, and 237, and SOCI 223, 232, 332, and 337.

A Criminal Justice minor complements a variety of majors, including Psychology, Sociology, Pre-Law, Government, and Political Science. The minor in Criminal Justice consists of 18 hours. Required courses include CJST 241, 334, 353, 372, 422, and one 3-hour elective.

Criminal Justice Courses (CJST)

241. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States. Examines crime and the nature of law, the process of justice, aspects of criminal law and procedure, the courts and adjudication, and law enforcement. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered fall semester.

332. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND BEHAVIOR (3)

Introduction to theoretical, practical and cultural issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political and socioeconomic forces are examined that impact discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes and behaviors in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

333. HELPING RELATIONSHIPS, THEORIES, AND SKILLS (3)

This course is designed to expose students to core communication skills essential to helping relationships. Students are presented with basic listening and action-oriented skills within the context of professional values, multidisciplinary theory base, including issues related to working with diverse populations. Emphasis is upon experiential role-playing and practice in non-verbal expression, active listening, exploration, constructive confrontation, conflict resolution, and other interviewing/helping skills essential to a professional helper. Prerequisite: Upper division standing.

334. CRIMINAL AND DELINQUENT BEHAVIOR (3)

Study of the nature and cause of crime and delinquency, including punishment, correction, and prevention of crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 and CJST 241. Offered fall semester.

335. DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (3)

Study of the nature and extent of drug addiction and alcohol problems, characteristics of an addictive society, the political economy of drugs and alcohol, community treatment facilities, and services to addicts and their families. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

336. ABUSE AND NEGLECT IN US FAMILIES (3)

This is a study of abuse and neglect in the United States and across the lifespan. Types of abuse and neglect addressed include: sexual, physical, and emotional. Theoretical models for understanding the phenomena and treatment for both the victim and offender are examined. Attention to developing a framework for the church's response to families in crisis is also explored. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

340. CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

A core component of service delivery in every sector of human services. This introduction covers case management roles, functions, models, fields of service, managed care, practice functions, and policy issues. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered spring semester.

342. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3)

A comprehensive overview of juvenile delinquency phenomenon and causation, prevention, control and treatment, including the operation of the juvenile justice system. The role of the faith-based movement in prevention and treatment are addressed. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered fall semester.

353. CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA (3)

General overview of the American correctional system. Includes the development of the concept of corrections, the correctional process, the correctional client, correctional institutions, institutional procedures, treatment approaches, effects of institutionalization, the role of jails, community-based corrections, probation, parole, and other release programs. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

372. CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE (3)

Introduction to the essentials of criminal law and the most significant legal issues confronting today's criminal justice professionals. Examines the constitutional policy making of the United States Supreme Court pertaining to criminal law and procedures as well as other salient issues in contemporary criminal justice and legal discourse.

422. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION (3)

This is a course in criminal investigation and will address such topics as the evolution of criminal investigation, the investigative process, evidence identification, collection and processing, interviewing and interrogation, report writing, follow-up investigation, and the crime laboratory. This course will also teach students how to conduct various types of criminal investigations.

423. LAW ENFORCEMENT ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION (3)

This is an advanced course in general police organization. The role of the police department in the community, and as a part of the political entity will be examined. The course approaches the subject matter from the standpoint of the municipal police agency; traditional concepts of organization and administration are covered. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and CJST 334. Offered spring semester.

425. LAW ENFORCEMENT & SECURITY OFFICER HANDGUN INSTR (3)

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills, knowledge and ability to safely carry, maintain, and utilize a handgun in performance of Law Enforcement or Armed Security Officer duties. The course will cover multiple topics of range safety and commands, handgun nomenclature and maintenance, and the fundamentals of marksmanship in a variety of settings. Further, this course requires practical live fire exercises, in addition to classroom learning and assessment. Course lab fee: $500 (covers gun rental, all ammo, targets, range rental). Students must supply their own hearing protection, eye protection, and ball cap. Students will be required to sign an injury release/waiver prior to going to the range. JR/SR standing; permission of Program Coordinator.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (1-3)

Meets the needs of individual students that cannot be satisfied by other courses. Open only to students of senior standing with approval of the Program Coordinator and Department Chair.

498. PRACTICUM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3-6)

Students work in a law enforcement agency under the supervision of a field instructor to gain practical experience. Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of the Program Coordinator.

Suggested Program for the Criminal Justice Major

First YearSecond Year
BEHV 100 University Seminar    1 BIBL 116 New Testament Literature    3
BIBL 111 Essential Christianity    3 CJST 241 Introduction to Criminal Justice    3
SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology    3 CJST 296 Sophomore Seminar    2
Effective Communication Option: COMM 205    3 SOCI 223 Social Psychology    3
FIN 138 Personal Finance    3 Course in Minor    3
Behavioral and Social Sciences Option    3 BEHV 210 Statistics    3
BIBL 115 Old Testament Literature    3 Natural Science Option with Lab    4
Natural Science Option w/o Lab    3 Course in Minor    3
Historical Inquiry Option    3 CJST Criminal Justice Elective    3
Humanities Option    3 Readng and Imagination Option: HUMN 230 or ENGL 123    3
PSYC 138 Psych of Healthy Relationships         3    
Total   31 Total   32
Third YearFourth Year
Behavioral and Social Sciences Degree Requirement    3 CJST 422 Criminal Investigation    3
CJST 334 Criminal & Delinquent Behavior    3 ICST 350 Global Connections    3
CJST 372 Criminal Law & Procedure    3 Course in Minor    3
Course in Minor    3 Bible Book Study Option: BIBL 360-370    3
Artistic Expression Option: HUMN 240 Culture    3 Elective    3
THEO 320 Interdisciplinary: Pentecost    3 Course in Minor    3
CJST 353 Corrections in America    3 CJST Practicum    3
CJST Criminal Justice Elective    3 CJST 423 Law Enforcement Org. Adm.    3
Course in Minor    3 Elective    3
Elective    3 Behavioral and Social Sciences Degree Requirement    3
    Elective    3
Total   30 Total   33

The Psychology Program at Evangel University

Objectives of the Psychology program include the following:

1. Students will have knowledge of the major theoretical approaches, subfields, and trends in psychology, and examine them from a biblical perspective.
2. Students will apply the scientific method and critical thinking in the study of human behavior and experiences.
3. Students will understand human behavior in light of culture, diversity, and human development.
4. Students will express themselves effectively in written and oral communication for the discipline of psychology.
5. Students will gain self-awareness of their behavior, motives, values, and strengths, and exhibit self-regulation and professionalism.
6. Students will demonstrate the integration of their Christian faith with their knowledge of psychology.
7. Students will prepare for vocational training or graduate work in such fields as counseling, school counseling, clinical psychology, social work, criminal justice, pastoral counseling, and marriage and family counseling.  

The mission of the Evangel University Psychology program is to provide students with a generalist knowledge base of the field of psychology, to undertand and make use of both the scientific method and the integration of Christian faith in explaining human behavior, to encourage students to serve others within the context of their Christian faith and personal strengths, and to help students pursue a career in the helping professions and/or graduate studies.

The program offers three minors (Psychology, Biopsychology, and Psychology in the Church) as well as a Psychology concentration, to complement a variety of majors such as Church Ministires, Theology, Intercultural Studies, Education, and other helping professions.

Psychology Major Requirements:

PSYCCOURSE TITLECREDITS
112 Introduction to Psychology 3
223 Social Psychology 3
234-7 A developmental psychology course 3
296 Sophomore Seminar 2
345 Introduction to Research Methods 3
371 Abnormal Psychology 3
433 Psychology of Personality 3
449 Psychology and Christian Theology 3
480 Experimental Psychology 3
  Psychology Electives (9 credits must be 300-level or above)  12
  TOTAL 38

A Psychology concentration consists of 26 hours and must include the following:

PSYCCOURSE TITLECREDITS
112 Introduction to Psychology 3
223 Social Psychology 3
234-7 a developmental psychology course  3
296 Sophomore Seminar 2
345 Research Methods in Psychology  3
338 Mental Health 3
371 Abnormal Psychology 3
  Upper Division Psychology Electives 6
  TOTAL 26

A Psychology minor consists of 18 credits, and must include the following requirements:

PSYCCOURSE TITLECREDITS
112 Introduction to Psychology 3
223 Social Psychology 3
234-7 Developmental Psyc Course  3
338 Mental Health 3
371 Abnormal Psychology 3
  Upper-Division Psychology Elective   3
  TOTAL 18

The Psychology in the Church minor is designed for students who plan on working in a church setting or in ministerial professions. The pre-requisite course is Intro to Psychology (PSYC 112) OR Healthy Relationships (PSYC 138).  The following courses are required for the Psychology in the Church minor:

PSYCCOURSE TITLECREDITS
234-7 Developmental Psyc Course  3
323 Pastoral Counseling 3
333 Helping Skills 3
493 Grief/Trauma 3
  Electives (Choose two):
PSYC 335, 336, 338, 371, 449, 465 
6
  TOTAL 18

The Biopsychology minor is intended for those interested in pursuing careers that involve the interfacing of psychology and the medical field. These include careers in psychiatry, neuropsychology, and behavioral medicine.  This 21-hour minor requires the following courses:

PSYCCOURSE TITLECREDITS
112 Introduction to Psychology 3
351 Physiological Psychology 3
371 Abnormal Psychology 3
BIOL 101 Biological Science [1] 4
BIOL 211 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 or                                                 
311 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 [1]
4
BIOL 212 Human Anatomy & Physiology 11 or 
312 Human Anatomy and Physiology 11 [1]
4
  TOTAL 21

 [1] Can also meet a Core Curriculum requirement for one science with a lab or a BS requirement for a 3rd or 4th science.

This minor is not acceptable for Biology majors, unless they have another minor as well.

Psychology Courses (PSYC)

112. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Introduction to basic procedures in the study of behavior and to elementary principles of conditioning, motivation, emotion, personality, sensation, perception, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social dynamics. Prerequisite to advanced courses. Offered fall, spring and summer semesters.

138. PSYCHOLOGY OF HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS (3)

This course provides foundational exploration regarding personal wholeness in relationship to self, family, others and God. Emphasis is placed on personal application of course material to promote greater self-awareness and ability to live out healthy choices regarding areas explored in the course. Theoretical models are explored regarding development, mental health and relationships to include recognizing and coping with stress and interpersonal conflicts.

223. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Introduction to social psychology (a study of social influences upon individual and group attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors--how people influence one another and are influenced by others). Includes attitude formation, persuasion, propaganda, crowd and mob behavior, fads and fashions, and interpersonal attraction. Examines methods and examples of research, along with theories and the relation of theoretical principles and concepts to existing situations. Required for majors in Psychology. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 or PSYC 112. Offered fall and spring semesters.

233. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course is a study of childhood and adolescence from conception through puberty. Emphasis is on the physical, cognitive and socioemotional growth of the child and its impact on the maturation, learning, family,society, culture, identity and sexuality of the developing child and his or her system of values. This course may be used for the Behavioral and Social Science elective and meets the developmental psychology requirement for all Early Childhood and Elementary Education majors.

234. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Childhood development from conception to adolescence. Emphasis on the physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development of children. Prerequisite: PSYC 112. Offered fall and spring semesters.

235. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3)

The developmental sequence between childhood and adulthood. Emphasis on earlier development, as well as other psychological and physiological changes of youth during these years. In-depth study of general identity development, gender-identity issues, and the influence of family dynamics on adolescents' behavior. Examines specific problems facing today's adolescents. Prerequisite: PSYC 112. Offered fall and spring semesters.

236. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULTHOOD (3)

This course is an introduction to adult development and the aging process. Attention is given to the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, personality, and spiritual processes associated with adulthood. Additionally, this course will explore how to anticipate, prepare for, and support the dying and bereaved. This course is taught on demand.

237. LIFESPAN HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

Growth and development of the human organism biologically and socially from conception to death. Emphasis on the interaction of bio-psychosocial stresses on contemporary human development. Designed for students in Pre-nursing, Psychology, and Education. Prerequisite: PSYC 112.

298. FIELD OBSERVATION IN HUMAN SERVICES (1)

Exposure to Human Service Agencies. Through observation, job shadowing, and supervised learning experiences, the student learns how these agencies function, how the populations are served, and the personal and social problems that agencies may address. A minimum of 50 clock hours at the human service agency is required for each credit hour (e.g., 3 x 50 = 150 hours). Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair or Program Coordinator.

322. GRIEF COUNSELING (3)

This course will explore in depth the process of helping of people in times of grief, death, and trauma. Students will examine the psychological, existential and cultural understandings of the grief, death and dying process and the process of trauma and trauma recovery, as well as be encouraged to explore the grieving process in the context of their own lives. A theological and psychological understanding of death will be implemented in order to inform the process of providing pastoral care and counseling for grief issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 112, SOCI 111, or psychology equivalent.

323. PASTORAL COUNSELING (3)

This course is designed to help students understand the integration of psychology in the life of the church and community services. Students will examine the place of counseling from both professional counseling and pastoral lenses. Current mental health issues will be studied as well as how a faith community could help at various levels (preventive-educational, relational-discipleship, and professional-therapeutic). Prayer, Scriptural intervention, the place of the Holy Spirit will be examined, as will an overview of personality and counseling theory. Students will become further acquainted with psychological disorders from the DSM-V, and helping people dealing with: grief, abuse, trauma, and life adjustment situations. Students will also be encouraged to look at their own integration of faith and life.

332. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND BEHAVIOR (3)

Introduction to theoretical, practical and cultural issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political and socioeconomic forces are examined that impact discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes and behaviors in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

333. HELPING RELATIONSHIPS, THEORIES, AND SKILLS (3)

This course is designed to expose students to core communication skills essential to helping relationships. Students are presented with basic listening and action-oriented skills within the context of professional values, multidisciplinary theory base, including issues related to working with diverse populations. Emphasis is upon experiential role-playing and practice in non-verbal expression, active listening, exploration, constructive confrontation, conflict resolution, and other interviewing/helping skills essential to a professional helper. Prerequisite: Upper division standing.

335. DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (3)

Study of the nature and extent of drug addiction and alcohol problems, characteristics of an addictive society, the political economy of drugs and alcohol, community treatment facilities, and services to addicts and their families. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

336. ABUSE AND NEGLECT IN US FAMILIES (3)

This is a study of abuse and neglect in the United States and across the lifespan. Types of abuse and neglect addressed include: sexual, physical, and emotional. Theoretical models for understanding the phenomena and treatment for both the victim and offender are examined. Attention to developing a framework for the church's response to families in crisis is also explored. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

338. MENTAL HEALTH (3)

This course examines the normal personality with emphasis on the psychology of adjustment and healthy personal development. Focus is placed on recognizing and coping with stress and interpersonal psychological challenges. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology. Offered spring semester.

340. CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

Case Management is a core component of service delivery in every sector of human services. This introduction covers case management roles, functions, models, fields of service, managed care, practice functions, and policy issues. Prerequisites: PSYC 112 and SOCI 111. Offered fall and spring semesters.

341. HISTORY AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

The origin and development of psychology within science and philosophy. Foundations of modern psychology in Europe and America, along with the development and elaboration of modern systems of psychology. Examines and evaluates current trends. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology. Offered on demand.

345. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course is an introduction to psychological research including observational, survey, correlational, and experimental methodologies. This course will also introduce the style guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA) for writing, citation, and publication in the social sciences. In addition, this course equips student to utilize the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) in analyzing their own data sets. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology, including BEHV 210. Required for Psychology majors. Offered fall semester.

349. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS (3)

This course introduces the student to organizational behavior concepts, methods to develop effective people development strategies, examines insights into behavior changes that will increase success in organizations, and integrates Christian values with the concepts of principle-centered leadership and ethical management of people. Basic causes of individual and group problems in industry. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

351. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Introduction to information processing in the nervous system, including sensation, transduction, information processing, movement, perception, consciousness, attention, language, memory, motivation, and emotion. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, BIOL 211, and 9 hours of psychology. Offered spring semester.

353. PARENTING (3)

Basic principles and skills of effective parenting are examined. Attention is given to child development with references to parental responsibilities and expectations. An emphasis on age-appropriate parenting methods for creating a nurturing home environment is presented. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered summer session.

363. LEARNING AND MEMORY (3)

This course examines the theories of learning as they have developed historically and how they affect current educational psychological theory. The classic studies in animal learning, with emphasis on human learning, memory, and information processing are explored. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology. Offered on demand.

365. THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING (3)

The major schools of counseling and psychotherapy are presented. Provides a theoretical orientation to the field of psychotherapy. Attention to the underlying theory and assumptions of each approach. Emphasizes integration through case studies and reaction papers. Prerequisites: upper division standing and 9 hours of psychology, including PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

366. GROUP DYNAMICS (3)

This course is designed to study the major theoretical approaches concerning group functioning and group process. Emphasis will be placed on integrating both cognitive and experiential insights in order to develop skills for effective group leadership in a variety of group settings. This will be accomplished through the study of a variety of processes and methods of group dynamics in addition to active participation within a growth-group setting. Practice at a facilitating growth-group is expected. This is a prerequisite class for those planning on taking PSYC 497 sections 7 or 8 (Kenya practicum trip). Upper division standing and 9 hours of psychology, including PSYC 112 and 365. Offered spring semester.

371. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course examines the basis for labeling people as "abnormal." It investigates the theoretical approaches to psychopathology, the assessment of mental disorders, and a sampling of the current classification system of disorders with respect to symptomatology and treatment. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology, including PSYC 112. Offered spring and summer semesters.

380. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course is designed to proved psychology students with an opportunity to acquire a more in-depth understanding of psychological research by learning more advanced research designs and by developing and conducting their own research project. The course emphasizes experimental and quasi-experimental designs in psychological research, and data analysis using SPSS software. Prerequisites: 18 hours of psychology, including BEHV 210 and PSYC 345. Offered spring semester.

433. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY (3)

This course is an introduction to the major approaches, methods, and findings in the field of personality. It presents an overview of classic theories, strategies, and conclusions regarding the formation and structure of personality. Present day personality conceptualizations will be explored from several domains, including the dispositional, biological, intrapsychic, cognitive, and social/cultural. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology, including PSYC 112. Offered spring semester.

434. PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING (3)

This course examines the psychological assessment techniques used in a wide range of areas, including vocational, personality, and social instruments. Test construction and measures of reliability and validity, along with assessment philosophies and the ethics of psychological testing are explored. Students will complete a collection of the tests, write reports addressing the results, and design their own tests. Prerequisite: 9 hours of psychology, including BEHV 210, and upper division standing. Offered fall semester.

439. PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)

This course is designed to help students think psychologically about religious phenomena from the perspective of evangelical Christianity. The assumptions and methods of psychological approaches to the study of religious beliefs, experiences, and behaviors as they relate to integration of psychology and theology are examined. It includes a review of research findings by applying constructs to selected aspects of religious behavior. Prerequisites: Upper division standing and 9 hours of psychology. Offered fall semester.

449. PSYCHOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY (3)

This course is designed to engage students in the integration of the science of psychology and Christian theology. Special consideration is given to exploring how Christian theology integrates with psychological science, research, and practice as well as how psychology influences Christian theology. Students will examine the origins of human life, the fall from grace, sin and evil, redemption, and discipleship from a psychological perspective. Students will use biblical and psychological principles to construct an integrated perspective for understanding and working with people in various vocational settings. Students will also be challenged to consider their own integration of Christian faith and life.

463. COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE (3)

The course reviews knowledge and theories about how the human brain performs various cognitive activities. Cognitive neuroscience includes topics such as attention, learning, memory, thinking, reasoning, problem solving, language learning, and social cognition. Prerequisites: 9 hours of psychology (PSYC 112, 345, and one developmental psychology course).

465. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

This course is an introduction to classic theories of marriage and family counseling. Focus will be given to the historical development of system theories. It will compare various systems approaches to marriage and family therapy to styles of individual and group counseling. Prerequisites: upper division standing and 9 hours of psychology, including PSYC 112 and 365. Offered spring semester.

475. PSYCHOLOGY OF SEXUALITY (3)

For senior Psychology, and Social Work majors. This course is an in-depth study of psychological, social, biological, and theological aspects of human sexuality. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of advisor. Offered fall semester.

490. DIRECTED READINGS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)

Independent study in selected areas of psychological literature. Prerequisites: 17 hours of psychology and permission of Department Chair and supervising professor.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)

Meet the needs of individual students that cannot be satisfied in other courses. Prerequisites: upper division standing and permission of Department Chair.

496. RESEARCH PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)

This course is a senior honor's research psychology course in which students carry out their proposed research with faculty guidance. Students will conduct a research project and present the results in both an oral and written format. Students will also learn to analyze, critique, and discuss professional research. The faculty recommends this course for students who plan to attend graduate school. Prerequisite: 21 hours of psychology, including BEHV 210, PSYC 345, and PSYC 380. Offered fall semester.

497. RESEARCH INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY (.5-3)

This course provides opportunity for students to work closely with selected professors in research, and support functions to enhance their knowledge and experience in psychology as an academic profession. Research team experience will be given by joining with a professor on research projects. Typical activities may include library research, project design, data collection, data entry, and participation in project discussions. Additionally, students will have the option to participate in a culminating experience with attendance at a state or regional psychology conference. (Students who choose to attend such conference, must also register for the lab; PSYC 497-50). Students must log 50 clock hours per credit hour. Offered pending project availability. Prerequisites: BEHV 210, PSYC 345, PSYC 480 (students enrolled in PSYC 480 are eligible to participate in this internship). Prerequisite: Upper division majors selected by the Program or Research Coordinator. Offered fall semester.

498. PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY (3-6)

Special projects for advanced psychology students, including clinical practice in a local mental health facility or social service agency under close professional supervision. Students spend 50 clock hours at the facility or agency including staff conferences for each hour of academic credit. Open to Psychology majors, concentrations, and minors with advanced standing. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising professor.

Social Work

The Evangel Social Work program is committed to educating bachelor-level students in generalist social work pracitce. This includes a foucs not only on individuals and families but groups, organizations, and communities. The program's primary mission is to prepare generalist soical workers who seek to ethically integrate their faith and practice within diverse settings, as social change agents and empowering leaders, with a commitment to enhancing the quality of life of all people and communities. Graduates are prepared for graduate-level education and entry-level social work positions and gain employement in areas involving mental health, health care, corrections, child welfare, schools, addictions, and various community issues.

The Bachelor of Social Work degree (BSW) is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and the curriculum has been established to meet those standards.

Required courses for the Social Work comprehensive major are BEHV 210*, SWK 233, 271, 272, 296*, 332, 333, 343, 354, 355, 471, 472, 480, 496, 498, and 499. An additional 6 hours in upper division electives (300-400 level) are chosen from within the Behavioral and Social Sciences Department (60 credit hours).

A Social Work minor consists of 18 hours and must include SWK 233, 271 or 272, 333, 340, and 354 or 355, plus 3 upper division elective hours.

After completing Introduction to Social Work and Sophomore Seminar, students with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 must formally make application to the Social Work program. Further details are found in the Social Work Handbook. The comprehensive major requires a minimum final grade of C- for all Social Work courses.

Specific General Education courses required for Social Work majors include PSYC 112, SOCI 111, GOVT 170, SSCI 213, and BIOL 124.

*Departmental or General Education requirements.

Social Work Courses (SWK)

233. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK (3)

An introduction to the social work profession and a variety of fields of social work practice. Includes the philosophy, historical development and core concepts of social work along with an overview of the integration of faith and practice. Prerequisites: SOCI 111, PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

271. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (3)

Provides a basic conceptual framework for creating and organizing theories and knowledge about human behavior and social environments. Students analyze biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, and spiritual variables to examine human growth and development across the lifespan. Considers how human behavior and social environments inform social work practice with various populations, including those at risk. Addresses the impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression on development. Prerequisites: SOCI 111, PSYC 112, and BIOL 124. Offered spring semester.

272. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II (3)

Second of two courses which utilizes a biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, and spiritual perspective to understanding human behavior within families, groups, organizations, and communities. Integration of social work and faith-based values and ethics related to cultural diversity, social and economic justice, and at-risk populations. Prerequisites: SOCI 111, PSYC 112, GOVT 170, and SSCI 213. Concurrent or prerequisite: SWK 233. Offered fall semester.

298. FIELD OBSERVATION IN HUMAN SERVICES (1-3)

Exposure to Human Service agencies. Through observation, job shadowing, and supervised learning experiences, students learn how these agencies function, the populations that are served, and the personal and social problems the agencies may address. Students spend a minimum of 50 clock hours at the Human Service agency for each credit hour earned (e.g. 3 x 50 = 150 hours). Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair or Social Work program coordinator.

332. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND BEHAVIOR (3)

Introduction to theoretical, practical and cultural issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political and socioeconomic forces are examined that impact discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes and behaviors in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

333. HELPING RELATIONSHIPS, THEORIES, AND SKILLS (3)

This course is designed to expose students to core communication skills essential to helping relationships. Students are presented with basic listening and action-oriented skills within the context of professional values, multidisciplinary theory base, including issues related to working with diverse populations. Emphasis is upon experiential role-playing and practice in non-verbal expression, active listening, exploration, constructive confrontation, conflict resolution, and other interviewing/helping skills essential to a professional helper. Prerequisite: Upper division standing.

335. DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (3)

Study of the nature and extent of drug addiction and alcohol problems, characteristics of an addictive society, the political economy of drugs and alcohol, community treatment facilities and services to addicts and their families. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

336. ABUSE AND NEGLECT IN US FAMILIES (3)

This is a study of abuse and neglect in the United States and across the lifespan. Types of abuse and neglect addressed include: sexual, physical, and emotional. Theoretical models for understanding the phenomena and treatment for both the victim and offender are examined. Attention to developing a framework for the church's response to families in crisis is also explored. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

340. CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

A core component of service delivery in every sector of human services. This introduction covers case management roles, functions, models, fields of service, managed care, practice functions, and policy issues. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall semester and spring semesters.

343. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I (3)

First in a sequence of three social work practice courses. The Generalist Model of social work practice is applied to individuals, families, communities, and organizations using the planned change process and strengths perspective. Values and ethics, roles and cultural competency are addressed. Prerequisites: SWK 233, SWK 271, SWK 272, SWK 296, SWK 354. Admission to the Social Work Program required. Offered spring semester.

353. PARENTING (3)

Basic principles and skills for effective parenting. Attention to child development with reference to parental responsibilities and expectations. Emphasis on parent methods of creating a nurturing home environment through a parent's own adult development. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered summer session.

354. SOCIAL POLICY I (3)

Survey of the American social welfare system and related fields of practice. Examines major social welfare policies from various perspectives in light of current political and economic trends. Attention to social work values and ethics related to the social welfare system with a focus on at-risk populations and the impact of social and economic justice issues. The role of the church within social welfare system is addressed. Prerequisites: SOCI 111, GOVT 170, and SSCI 213, and junior standing. Offered fall semester.

355. SOCIAL POLICY II (3)

Expands upon the concepts in Social Policy I. Prepares students to analyze and evaluate social problems systematically using a policy perspective while assessing the effect of policy on social work practice. Includes use of influence and advocacy to address policies and programs. Prerequisites: GOVT 170, SSCI 213, BEHV 210, SWK 271, SWK 272, SWK 296, SWK 354, and junior standing. Offered spring semester.

372. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II (3)

Second of two courses which utilizes a biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, and spiritual perspective to understanding human behavior within families, groups, organizations, and communities. Integration of social work and faith-based values and ethics related to cultural diversity, social and economic justice, and at-risk populations. Prerequisites: SOCI 111, PSYC 112, GOVT 170, and SSCI 213. Concurrent or prerequisite: SWK 233. Offered fall semester.

471. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II (3)

Second in a sequence of three social work practice courses. Utilizes the Generalist problem solving model for intervention with individuals and families with a focus on diverse client systems. Co-requisites: SWK 480, SWK 498, and SWK 499. Admission to Social Work Program required. Offered fall semester.

472. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE III (3)

Third in a sequence of three social work practice courses. Utilizes the generalist problem solving model for intervention with groups, communities and organizations. Includes a capstone macro community project with a leadership focus. Co-requisites: SWK 496, SWK 498, and SWK 499. Admission to Social Work Program required. Offered spring semester.

480. METHODS OF RESEARCH IN SOCIAL WORK (3)

Focus on the philosophy of science, research methodology, and ethical issues related to research. Empirically based knowledge, theory and practice issues related to sound research design and implementation are addressed. Includes interpretation of professional research and the formulation of individual student research projects. Prerequisite: completion of all 200 and 300 level required social work courses, acceptance into the Social Work program, and senior standing. Co-requisites: SWK 471, SWK 498 and SWK 499. Offered fall semester.

490. DIRECTED READINGS IN SOCIAL WORK (1-2)

Personal study in the literature of interest or to fill gaps in knowledge of the field. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising professor, Program Coordinator, and Department Chair.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL WORK (1-3)

Meets needs of students that cannot be satisfied in other courses. Open only to students of senior standing with permission of supervising professor, Program Coordinator, and Department Chair.

496. GUIDED RESEARCH IN SOCIAL WORK (3)

Continuation of the research sequence. Guided research in areas of current concerns within practicum agencies. Students implement a research project as designed in SWK 480 and make both a written and an oral presentation of their findings. Prerequisites: completion of all 200 and 300 level required social work courses, SWK 480, acceptance into the Social Work program, and senior standing. Co-requisites: SWK 472, SWK 498 and SWK 499. Offered spring semester.

497. INTERNSHIP IN SOCIAL WORK (1-3)

Opportunity for outstanding students to apply for the limited number of internships in the Social Work Program. Students work closely with selected professors and community partners in professional settings to enhance their knowledge and experience in social work. Prerequisite: upper-division majors selected by the Social Work Program Director.

498. PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL WORK (9 credit hours:4 Fall Semester, 5 Spring Semester

Integration of curriculum content through supervised field placements with diverse client systems. Students participate in practicum for a minimum of 9 credit hours (or 450 clock hours). Students dedicate 50 clock hours for each credit hour. Failure to make a grade of C- or better in either semester results in the student repeating the hours for that semester. Professional liability insurance required for enrollment in this course. Prerequisites: Completion of all 200- and 300-level required Social Work courses, acceptance into Social Work Program, senior-level standing, and consent of field coordinator. Co-requisites in the fall: SWK 471, SWK 480, and SWK 499. Co-requisites in the spring: SWK 472, SWK 496, and SWK 499.

499. INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR (2)

Capstone course for the Social Work Program. Integrates a Generalist perspective of theory, methods, skills, and values of practice from prior and current Social Work courses with knowledge and experience gained in the student's field placement. Provides students an opportunity to discuss practice concerns and learning contract/program objectives. Co-requisites in the fall: SWK 471, SWK 480, and SWK 498. Co-requisites in the spring: SWK 472, SWK 496, and SWK 498. Offered fall and spring semesters.

Suggested Program For The Social Work Major

First YearSecond Year
BEHV 100 University Seminar   1 SWK 233 Intro to Social Work   3 
BIBL 111 Essential Christianity   3  SWK 296 Sophomore Seminar   2
ENGL 102/111 Composition   2-3 BIBL 116 New Testament Lit.   3 
PSYC 112 Intro to Psychology   3  Natural Science Elective w/ lab: BIOL 124   4
FIN 138 Personal Finance   3 Reading and Imagination Option: ENGL 123   3
Humanities Option   3 Elective   2
BIBL 115 Old Testament Lit.   3 SWK 271 HBSE I   3
Natural Science Option w/o Lab   3 SWK 332 Human Diversity   3
SOCI 111 Intro to Sociology   3 SSCI 213 Economics in Society   3
Effective Communication Option: COMM 205   3 Historical Inquiry Option: GOVT 170   3
Artistic Expression Option   3 Bible Book Study Option: BIBL 360-370   3
Total  31 Total  32
Third YearFourth Year
SWK 272 HBSE II   3  SWK 471 Social Work Practice II   3
SWK 354 Social Policy I   3  SWK 480 Research Methods   3
THEO 320 Interdisciplinary: Pentecost   3  SWK 498 Practicum (200 Hours)   4
SWK Upper Division Elective   3 SWK 499 Integrative Seminar   2
SWK Upper Division Elective (Abnormal Psych)   3 SWK 472 Social Work Practice III   3
SWK 343 Practice I   3 SWK 496 Guided Research     3
SWK 355 Social Policy II   3 SWK 498 Practicum (250 Hours)   5
BEHV 210 Statistics   3 SWK 499 Integrative Seminar   2
SWK 333 Helping Relationships   3 Elective   6
SWK Upper Division Behavioral and Social Sciences Elective   3    
Total  30 Total  31

Suggested Courses for Electives: Abnormal Psychology, Case Management, Foreign Language

General Suggestions: Consider 2 summer school sessions to reduce load as a junior and senior student.

Sociology

Study in Sociology is recommended for those interested in leadership in communities, college and university teaching, research, cross-cultural studies, foreign service, journalism, social work, human relations, community planning, and church ministries.

A Sociology minor consists of 18 hours and must include SOCI 111, 223, and 332, plus 9 upper division (300-400 level) elective hours.

Sociology Courses (SOCI)

111. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)

Basic principles of social structures and processes. Major concepts and the scientific point of view in dealing with social phenomena. Social institutions and their interrelationships. Prerequisite to advanced courses.

223. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Introduction to social psychology (a study of social influences upon individual and group attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors--how people influence one another and are influenced by others). Includes attitude formation, persuasion, propaganda, crowd and mob behavior, fads and fashions, and interpersonal attraction. Examines methods and examples of research and theories and the relation of theoretical principles and concepts to existing situations. Required for majors in Psychology and Sociology. Suggested for majors in Psychology, Communications, and Biblical Studies. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 or PSYC 112. Offered fall and spring semesters.

231. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Basic concepts of anthropology and a survey of its sub-disciplines. Includes ethnology, social anthropology, culture dynamics, culture and personality, anthropological linguistics, prehistoric man, physical anthropology, and the concept of race. Offered spring semester.

232. SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3)

Introduction to the study of social problems from several perspectives. Examines problems of drug abuse, crime, education, and the family in the light of basic principles and theories of sociology. Offered spring semester and on demand.

241. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

Introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States. Examines crime and the nature of law, the process of justice, aspects of criminal law and procedure, the courts and adjudication, and law enforcement. Prerequisites: SOCI 111. Offered fall semester.

298. FIELD OBSERVATION IN HUMAN SERVICES (1-3)

Exposure to Human Service Agencies. Through observation, job shadowing, and supervised learning experiences, the student learns how these agencies function, the populations that are served, and the personal and social problems that agencies may address. Students spend a minimum of 50 clock hours at the human service agency for each credit hour (e.g., 3 x 50 = 150 hrs.). Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair and Program Coordinator. Offered spring semester.

331. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY (3)

The family as a social institution, including its functions and history, modern trends and changes, and the relation of parent and child. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered fall semester alternating years.

332. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND BEHAVIOR (3)

Introduction to theoretical, practical and cultural issues related to diverse populations. Historical, political and socioeconomic forces are examined that impact discriminatory and oppressive values, attitudes and behaviors in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

333. HELPING RELATIONSHIPS, THEORIES, AND SKILLS (3)

This course is designed to expose students to core communication skills essential to helping relationships. Students are presented with basic listening and action-oriented skills within the context of professional values, multidisciplinary theory base, including issues related to working with diverse populations. Emphasis is upon experiential role-playing and practice in non-verbal expression, active listening, exploration, constructive confrontation, conflict resolution, and other interviewing/helping skills essential to a professional helper. Prerequisite: Upper division standing.

334. CRIMINAL AND DELINQUENT BEHAVIOR (3)

The nature and cause of crime and delinquency, including punishment, correction, and prevention of crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered fall semester.

335. DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (3)

The nature and extent of drug addiction and alcohol problems, characteristics of an addictive society, and political economy of drugs and alcohol, community treatment facilities and services to addicts and their families. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester.

336. ABUSE AND NEGLECT IN US FAMILIES (3)

This is a study of abuse and neglect in the United States and across the lifespan. Types of abuse and neglect addressed include: sexual, physical, and emotional. Theoretical models for understanding the phenomena and treatment for both the victim and offender are examined. Attention to developing a framework for the church's response to families in crisis is also explored. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall semester.

337. URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Interdisciplinary study of the process of urbanization and the problems facing America's cities. Focus on the interrelationships between political and economic forces and ways to bring positive change in our cities. Recommended for those interested in inner-city ministry. Offered fall semester alternating years.

340. CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

A core component of service delivery in every sector of human services. This introduction covers case management roles, functions, models, fields of service, managed care, practice functions, and policy issues. Prerequisites: SOCI 111 and PSYC 112. Offered fall and spring semesters.

353. PARENTING (3)

Basic principles and skills for effective parenting. Attention to child development with references to parental responsibilities and expectations. Emphasis on parenting methods of creating a nurturing home environment through a parent's own adult development. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered summer session.

435. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)

Overview of the study of religion and the church from a sociological perspective. Theories about religion and society with focus on church attendance, secularization, and social change. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered spring semester alternating years.

480. METHODS OF RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Focus on the philosophy of science, research methodology, and ethical issues related to research. Empirically based knowledge, theory and practice issues related to sound research design and implementation are addressed. Includes interpretation of professional research and the formulation of individual student research projects. Prerequisite: completion of all 200 and 300 level required sociology courses, and senior standing. Offered fall semester.

490. DIRECTED READINGS IN SOCIOLOGY (1-2)

Personal study in the literature of a student's interest or to fill gaps in the knowledge of the field. Prerequisites: 17 hours of sociology and permission of Department Chair and supervising professor.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SOCIOLOGY (1-3)

Meets the needs of individual students that cannot be satisfied in other courses. Open only to those of senior standing with approval of Department Chair.

496. GUIDED RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

Continuation of the research sequence. Guided research in areas of current concerns within practicum agencies. Students implement a research project as designed in SOCI 480 and make both a written and an oral presentation of their findings. Prerequisite: completion of all 200 and 300 level required sociology courses, SOCI 480, and senior standing.

497. INTERNSHIP IN SOCIOLOGY (1-3)

Opportunity for outstanding students to apply for the limited number of internships in the Department of Behavioral Sciences each semester. Students work closely with selected professors in class, clinical, research, and support functions to enhance their knowledge and experience in Sociology as an academic profession. Prerequisite: Upper division majors. Must receive prior approval by the Department Chair.

498. PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY (1-6)

Special projects for advanced students, including clinical practice in a local social service agency under close professional supervision. Students spend 50 clock hours for each hour of academic credit. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising professor.

Anthropology

Courses in Anthropology are especially useful to those expecting to work in multicultural fields such as missions, education, and overseas employment in business and government.

Anthropology Courses (ANTH)

231. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

Emphasizes the basic concepts of anthropology and a survey of its sub-disciplines. Topics include ethnology, social anthropology, culture dynamics, culture and personality, anthropological linguistics, prehistoric man, physical anthropology, and the concept of race. (This course is also acceptable for 3 semester credits of the non-laboratory science requirements for the B.S. degree.)

241. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

An examination of history, objectives, and methods of archaeological discovery and interpretation; cultural, historical, and functional analysis of technique; and readings in selected primary sources. (This course is also acceptable for 3 semester credits of the non-laboratory science requirements for the B.S. degree.)

310. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3)

A study of foundations, principles, and theories of communication and the impact of culture on communication.

332. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND BEHAVIOR (3)

A study of the Principles and theories to increase awareness of diverse cultures throughout Human Society and how they can communicate with each other.

334. WORLD RELIGIONS (3)

A study of the living religions of the world, comparing their historical and cultural backgrounds, philosophies, teachings, and influence.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (1)

Offered on demand

Geography

A geography course meets the requirements of a standard certificate for teaching and enhances the Social Science program. The course is also acceptable for 3 semester credits of the non-laboratory science requirements for the B.S. degree.

211. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3)

Regional approach to the study of the patterns that people make on the earth as the result of their political, social, economic, and cultural activities and the interaction and impact of the earth and the natural environment on people's activities.

Government

Government offerings are designed for students interested in careers in teaching, law, government service, active politics, international relations, diplomacy, and civic activities. Course work in this area is also useful for those who plan to teach social studies on the secondary level.

The Government major consists of a minimum of 30 credits. In addition to the core requirements, seven additional courses must be taken in the following fields of study: American Government and Politics, Comparative Government and Politics, International Relations, Prelaw, and Political Philosophy.

Government Requirements

Course Course Title Credits
GOVT 170 American Government     3
GOVT 437 Church State Relations     3
SSCI 225 Research Methods for the Social Sciences     3

The Government concentration consists of a minimum of 24 credits, including GOVT 170 and 437.

The Government minor consists of a minimum of 18 credits, including GOVT 170.

The Behavioral and Social Sciences Department encourages prelaw students to complete a major in Government or History with a minor in Government. Advisory sheets are available in the department office.

Any changes from the above program requirements require specific department approval.

Junior or senior Government majors may participate in the Washington Studies Program (GOVT 492-1), an internship program offered during part of the spring semester, during which students gain practical experience in politics by working in congressional and other government offices in the nation's capital.

101. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN THE US (3)

Course offered at Lester E. Cox College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Nursing students only.

170. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (3)

Analysis of the structure, principles, and processes of the American federal government.

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)

Study of city, county, and state governments with their relations to the national government.

221. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

Introduction to the administrative process in public bureaucracies with special attention to the problem of democratic accountability.

224. INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT PREVENTION AND RESOLUTION (3)

Examination of the basic foundations of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration used in the resolution of conflict in society. Prerequisite: GOVT 272.

260. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES (2)

Offered on demand

270. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES (2)

Offered on demand.

272. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LAW (3)

Study of the origins, nature, functions, and limits of the American legal and judicial systems. Prerequisite: GOVT 170 or consent of professor.

290. DIRECTED READINGS IN GOVERNMENT (1)

Offered on demand.

322. ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND PROCESS (3)

Study of the development, elements, principles, policies, procedures, practical problems, judicial review, and enforcement of modern administrative law. Prerequisite: GOVT 170.

323. THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS (3)

Structural, functional, developmental, and comparative analysis of the American national and state legislative systems.

334. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)

(Cross-listed with PHIL 334) Study of the foundational principles of Western political and social philosophy from Augustine to the present, including such philosophers as Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx.

335. ANCIENT WESTERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)

Systematic study of the foundations of Western political and social philosophy with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. (See PHIL 335.)

341. MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

Study of administrative practices at the local government level with an emphasis on budgetary processes and the delivery of public services. Prerequisite: GOVT 221.

345. AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICIES (3)

Study of the American public policy-making process and policy outcomes, including such areas as government regulation of business, health and welfare, energy and environmental protection, crime and criminal justice, transportation, and urban affairs. (See MGMT 345.)

347. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)

Fundamentals and principles shaping the foreign policies and diplomatic conduct of nations in the modern world.

348. AMERICAN DIPLOMACY (3)

Diplomatic relations of the United States and the development and reflections of foreign policy.

349. INTERNATIONAL LAW (3)

The nature and development of the international legal system which defines the right and practices of nation states as well as the judicial settlement of international disputes.

350. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3)

The nature and development of international organization with a special emphasis on the United Nations and its specialized agencies.

355. COMPARATIVE ISLAMIC GOVERNMENTS (3)

This course is a study of Islamic governments around the globe. The course will include an investigation of the political, religious, cultural, and legal changes that these nations have and will face.

364. LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

An area specific topical study of Latin American political development. Specific emphasis on Central America. The development of political practices and attitudes of the area and the development of political relations with the United States.

366. THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (3)

Study of the historical development, roles, and styles of the American presidency.

370. TOPICS IN GOVERNMENT/PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

Variable content focusing on significant developments in the study of politics, government, and/or public administration.

380. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES (3)

Study of the organization, development, and functions of American political parties, pressure groups, and elections.

391. INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH (3)

Introduction to the published sources and materials of the law, the techniques and methodology for using these published sources, and the analytical and organizational approaches for drafting legal memoranda.

435. AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I (3)

Study of major Supreme Court decisions dealing with judicial review, contract and commerce clauses, business relations, taxation, war, and foreign affairs.

437. CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS (3)

Study of the background, development, problems, and Constitutional aspects of church-state relations in the United States.

492. WASHINGTON STUDIES (3)

Intensive 2-week program in Washington, D.C., offered spring semester. Student leadership activities the first week followed by an internship in a congressional or other government office in the nation's capital. Prerequisite: Approval of department and Vice-President for Student Development.

270/470. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES (2)

Offered on demand.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS IN GOVERNMENT (1)

Offered on demand.

498. PRACTICUM IN GOVERNMENT (1)

Offered on demand.

History

The History major consists of a minimum of 30 credits with at least 16-18 upper-division (300-400 level) credits. At least 5 credits of the upper-division course work must be taken in American history and 5 credits in non-American history.

History Requirements

Course   Title    Credits
HIST 111 and 112 American History 1 and 2 6
HIST 115 and 116 World Civilization 1 and 2     6
HIST 496 or 498 Seminar or Practicum in History 1-3

 

History Electives  

Course  

American History Courses

Credits Course

World History Courses

Credits
HIST 331 Colonial America      3 HIST 460s/470s American Topics 2-6
HIST 337   Church State Relations 3 HIST 332 Early Christian Era 3
HIST 338 Religion and American Culture 3 HIST 334 Medieval History 3
HIST 341 Early American Republic 3 HIST 340 Renaissance and Reformation 3
HIST 342 American West 3 HIST 345 Nineteenth Century Europe 3
HIST 351 Civil War Era 3 HIST 346 Twentieth Century Europe 3
HIST 361 Twentieth Century United States 3 HIST 260s/270s  World Topics 2-6
HIST 260s/270s American Topics 2-6 HIST 460s/470s World Topics 2-6

History concentration (24 credits minimum) requires at least 12-14 upper-division (300-400 level) credits. A History minor consists of at least 18 credits, with a minimum of 6-8 upper-division credits.

The department allows 1/2 of the number of credit hours taken in the following subjects to count toward the History major, concentration, or minor: ART 330-338 (History of Art), MUSC 248 and 345-346 (Music History), and PHIL 334, 335, 336, 337. Students may not apply more than 3 such credits toward the major, concentration, or minor.

Public History minor will prepare students for entry level jobs working at national, state, and local historic sites, in museums, and in archives. The program will also provide students with the undergraduate background for graduate work in public history fields.  A Public History minor consists of the following courses: ANTH 241, HIST 215, HIST 225, HIST 298, HIST 305, HIST 490, and HIST 498.

Any change from the above programs requires department approval.

Elementary Education majors must take either HIST 111 or 112. History majors who wish to be certified to teach in the State of Missouri are required to take HIST 111 and 112, additional electives in American history to total 12 credits, HIST 115 and 116, and an additional elective in non-American history to total 8 credits, 6 credits in government (GOVT 170 and 202), GEOG 211, ECON 213 (Economics in Society), and 6 credits in the behavioral sciences (criminal justice, psychology, sociology, or social work). In addition, Elementary Education majors must include at least one course in college level mathematics, two courses in composition, one course in oral communication, and the appropriate teacher-education professional courses if they wish to be certified in the State of Missouri to teach secondary social studies. (Upon request, the department can provide a list of these courses.)

American History Courses

111. AMERICAN HISTORY I (3)

Survey from the time of discovery and exploration of America through the founding and development of the 13 English colonies, the Revolutionary War, the establishment of the United States Constitution and government, the War of 1812, westward expansion and manifest destiny, states' rights, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

112. AMERICAN HISTORY II (3)

Survey from 1877, examining American institutions and ideas; the rise of nationalism; the emergence of America as a strong nation; WWI and the Great Depression; WWII and the Cold War; and the United State's role in the worldwide political situation.

305. HISTORIC INTERPRETATION (3)

This course will focus on developing basic interpretation skills developed to help visitors understand and appreciate public history sites and museums.

325. MUSEUM ADMINISTRATION (3)

This course explores the varied roles and responsibilities in effectively managing a museum, whether large or small. Topics include museum governance, human resources management, fiscal responsibilities, fundraising, marketing and public relations, professionalism, and ethics.

331. COLONIAL AMERICA (3)

Study of the settlement and growth of the American colonies and the American Revolution. Prerequisite: 6 credits of American History (HIST 111 and 112) or consent of professor.

341. EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC (3)

Political, social, and economic development of the United States from the Revolution through the Jeffersonian and Jacksonian periods. Prerequisite: 6 credits of American History (HIST 111 and 112) or permission of professor.

342. THE AMERICAN WEST (3)

Exploration and development of the American West, including mining, transportation, and agriculture and their effects on American institutions. Prerequisite: 6 credits in American History (HIST 111 and 112) or permission of professor.

348. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES (3)

Diplomatic relations of the United States and the development and reflection of foreign policy. Prerequisite: 6 credits in American History (HIST 111 and 112) or permission of professor.

351. THE CIVIL WAR ERA (3)

Interpretation of the Civil War era, including abolitionism, slavery, politics, the society of the generation before 1860, and conflicting views of the reconstruction of the Union. Prerequisite: 6 credits of American History (HIST 111 and 112) or permission of professor.

361. TWENTIETH-CENTURY UNITED STATES (3)

An in-depth study of the United States in the twentieth century. Prerequisites: 6 credits of American History (HIST 111 and 112) or permission of professor.

366. THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (3)

Study of the historical development, roles, and styles of the American Presidency.

437. CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS (3)

Study of the background, development, problems, and Constitutional aspects of church-state relations in the United States.

World History Courses

115. WORLD CIVILIZATION I (3)

Survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of world civilization from antiquity to the Reformation. Students are exposed to a panoramic view of historical development, with emphasis on how people throughout history have addressed major issues confronting them within historical context.

116. WORLD CIVILIZATION II (3)

Survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of world civilization since the Reformation. Students are exposed to a panoramic view of historical development, with emphasis on how people throughout history have addressed major issues confronting them within historical context.

334. MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3)

Brief overview of the history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the discovery of the Americas.

340. RENAISSANCE-REFORMATION (3)

Study of Europe from A.D. 1300 to 1648, including a detailed study of the Renaissance, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the wars of religion. Prerequisite: HIST 115 & 116

345. NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE (3)

The period from the outbreak of the French Revolution to the end of the 19th century. Emphasis on the Age of the French Revolution and Napoleon, 19th-century liberalism, reaction, revolution, nationalism, and imperialism. Prerequisite: 6 credits in World History (HIST 115 and 116) or permission of professor.

346. TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE (3)

Europe from 1900 to the present. The causes and effects of World War I, Europe between the wars, the coming of World War II, and continuing unresolved problems. Prerequisite: 6 credits in World History (HIST 115 and 116) or permission of professor.

492. WASHINGTON STUDIES (3)

Intensive two-week program in Washington, D.C., during spring semester. Student leadership activities the first week followed by an internship in a congressional or other government office in the nation's capital. Prerequisites: Approval of department and Vice-President for Student Development.

260/469. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES (2)

260/460 Ancient, 265/465 American Religion and Society, 261/461 Medieval Europe, 266/466 North America, 262/462 Africa, 267/467 United States, 263/463 Asia, 268/468 Western Europe, 264/464 Latin America, 269/469 Eastern Europe.

270/470. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES (2)

260/460 Ancient, 265/465 American Religion and Society, 261/461 Medieval Europe, 266/466 North America, 262/462 Africa, 267/467 United States, 263/463 Asia, 268/468 Western Europe, 264/464 Latin America, 269/469 Eastern Europe.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS IN HISTORY (1)

By permission of department.

294/494. HISTORICAL TRAVEL (1)

Credit for national or foreign travel when supported by appropriate written reports. Students can receive credit if the travel is under the advice and/or sponsorship of an appropriate faculty member with the consent of the department head.

298/498. PRACTICUM IN AMERICAN HISTORY (1)

Offered on demand.

Social Sciences

For a student who wants a broad, liberal arts program in the social sciences, the department offers a major, concentration, and minor in Social Science. The Social Sciences major consists of a minimum of 40 credits of course work, including at least 24 credits in one of the academic disciplines from a major program of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. The remainder of the credits for the major must be taken from at least three of the other behavioral or social science fields: anthropology, economics, geography, government, history, sociology, psychology, criminal justice, and social work. At least 3 credits must be taken in each field selected, with at least 6 credits in one of these fields of study. The completed major must include a minimum of 12 upper-division (300-400 level) credits.

The Social Sciences concentration consists of a minimum of 24 credits from courses in anthropology, economics, geography, government, history, sociology, psychology, criminal justice, and social work. with a minimum of 12 credits in one field and courses selected from at least two other fields of study. At least 3 credits must be taken in each field selected. A completed concentration must include a minimum of 9 upper-division (300-400 level) credits.

The Social Sciences minor consists of at least 18 credits, 6 of which must be selected from one field with courses selected from at least two other fields of study. At least 3 credits must be taken in each field selected. The completed minor must include a minimum of 6 upper-division (300-400 level) credits.

Any change from the above program requires Department approval.

100. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR (1)

This introductory course helps new Evangel students acclimatize themselves to the University. As such, it serves as an intellectual and practical orientation to the challenges and opportunities of University life and learning. Students are introduced to Evangelís Christ-centered, integrational, exploratory, and global ethos. They learn to use and participate in campus-wide and department-specific offerings. They build relationships within departmental contexts as well as across campus. They are encouraged to understand that they are being prepared not only for a career but for life.

212. ECONOMICS IN SOCIETY (2)

Survey of leading economic theory and principles and their application to personal and national decision-making.

213. ECONOMICS IN SOCIETY (3)

Survey of leading economic theory and principles and their application to personal and national decision-making. The future economic challenges facing the American Social Security System and the American Education System.

225. RESEARCH METHODS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE (3)

This course is a study of the elementary principles of research and writing for the various disciplines within the Social Sciences. Students will develop their skills in research, critical thinking, writing styles, and analytical writing. This course is designed for sophomores with Social Science majors, though it is open to all students in the department who wish to improve their writing skills.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (1)

Examination of classroom methods and materials. Prerequisite: Secondary Education with a major or minor in the Social Sciences Department. Does not count toward a major or minor in Social Science.

353. METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS (3)

Materials and methods of teaching an area of specialty in the middle school.

260/460. AREA-TOPICAL STUDIES ANCIENT (2)

(See HIST 260-270/460-470 for explanation of numbering.)

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (1)

Offered on demand.

294/494. SOCIAL SCIENCES TRAVEL (1)

Credit for national or foreign travel when supported by appropriate written reports. Individual students receive credit if the travel is under the advice and/or sponsorship of an appropriate faculty member with permission of department or area recommending credit for the travel experience.

Social Science Education Major: Teacher Certification Program

To prepare for public school teaching certification, one must consider the requirements of the various states. The majors, concentrations, and minors are designed to meet the requirements of Missouri, which has reciprocity agreements with many states concerning teacher certification. However, a student should contact his or her specific State Department of Education for specific requirements.

To be certified by the State of Missouri in any of the social sciences, a student must have a total of 40 semester hours from the following disciplines: anthropology, economics, geography, government, history, psychology, and sociology. Specifically, students majoring in any of the social sciences must have a minimum of 12 credits in American history, 8 credits in world history, 6 credits of government, 6 credits from the behavioral sciences (sociology, anthropology, or psychology), 3 credits of economics, and 3 credits of geography. SSCI 336 is required for certification but is not counted toward the major. For additional information about secondary education professional requirements, consult the Department of Education section of the catalog.

Certification as an Elementary School Teacher with Social Science Emphasis

For Elementary Education majors, the social science emphasis consists of a total of 21 hours, including GOVT 170, HIST 111, HIST 112, GEOG 211, SSCI 213, HIST 115, and HIST 116.

Certification as a Middle School Teacher of Social Sciences

Those seeking middle school certification in Social Sciences must complete a concentration of at least 24 hours in social sciences, including GOVT 170, HIST 111, HIST 112, HIST 115, HIST 116, GEOG 211, SSCI 213, and 3 credits of electives in GOVT, HIST, Cross-cultural Communications, ANTH, PSYC, or SOCI to complete the minimum 24 credits. In addition, those seeking certification must complete all requirements for State certification.

Certification as a Secondary School Teacher of Social Sciences

Those seeking secondary level certification in Social Sciences must complete a major of at least 40 hours in Social Sciences, including HIST 111, HIST 112, HIST 115, HIST 116, 12 credits of upper-division (300 or 400 level) history electives,* SSCI 213, GEOG 211, GOVT 170, and GOVT 202. The remaining credit hours can be taken from any combination of the following: government, sociology, anthropology, or psychology. In addition, all Teacher Education students must also complete one course in mathematics, two courses in English composition, one course in speech, and all the professional courses required by the Missouri Department of Education.

*Missouri minimum requirements for teacher certification include 12 credits in American History and 8 credits in non-American History.

Certification for Middle School/Secondary Education (Certification Grades 5-12)

Students who desire certification in Social Sciences for grades 5-12 should see requirements in the Department of Education section of the catalog.

Military Science

Since 1977, the Military Science program (Army ROTC) has prepared Evangel men and women for commissions as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army, the Army National Guard, and the Army Reserves. EU's ROTC program is divided into two elective courses: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course. Students who enroll in Basic Course classes receive leadership, management, and confidence-building instruction which is valued highly in any chosen career field. Enrollment in the Advanced Course is restricted to students who meet department criteria and who contract as a cadet to become commissioned as an Army officer with a military service obligation. All non-U.S. citizens must have permission before enrolling in any Military Science course.

Basic Course

The Basic Course involves two freshman and two sophomore Military Science classes. Prerequisites exist for some of the classes. Check Basic Course class descriptions (below) for specifics. No military service obligation is required for enrolling in any of the Basic Course classes. These courses are similar to all other University courses. They carry academic credit and do not have uniform or appearance requirements. Basic Course topics include leadership, role and organization of the U.S. Army, physical fitness, rifle and pistol marksmanship, Army values, land navigation and map reading, and rappelling. The primary objective of the Basic Course is to provide college students with an understanding of the United States Army in general and Army ROTC in particular. Students who complete the four Basic Course classes and meet department criteria qualify for enrollment in the Advanced Courses if they decide to continue in the Military Science program to earn an officer's commission in the U.S. Army.

Advanced Course

The Advanced Course consists of two 300-level and two 400-level Military Science classes (see class descriptions below). Enrollment in all Advanced Course classes is by departmental permission. The primary objective of the Advanced Course is to prepare qualified college students for military service as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army, the National Guard, and the Army Reserves. Students accepted into this program receive $450 and $500 per month (tax-free) for 10 months of their junior and senior years, respectively. Additionally, Advanced Course students attend a 4-week leader development assessment course, usually between the junior and senior years. While at LDAC, students receive a salary, have meals and housing provided by the Army, and receive reimbursement for travel to and from the camp. Upon completion of the four Advanced Course classes, LDAC, and a Bachelor's degree, students are commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Army. Students may then elect to complete their military service either full-time in the U.S. Army or part-time in the Army National Guard or Army Reserves.

Before graduation, all students in the Advanced Course are required to take a course in military history (HIST 470). If their degree programs allow, Advanced Course students are encouraged (but not required) to take a course in the field of national security affairs and management. Additionally, all Advanced Course students and ROTC scholarship students must participate in a regularly scheduled physical fitness program.

Scholarships

The Army ROTC Scholarship program is open to all full-time college students. Both 2-year and 3-year scholarships are awarded each year on a best qualified basis. Students need not be enrolled in Military Science classes to compete. Army ROTC Scholarships provide full tuition, lab fees, educational fees, and book costs, and provide a monthly tax-free allowance between $300 and $500 for 10 months of each school year of the scholarship. Students who receive an Army ROTC Scholarship incur a military service obligation which is completed after graduation either full-time in the U.S. Army or part-time in the Army National Guard or Army Reserves.

Leadership Training Course (LTC)

A student who wants an Army officer's commission but who has not completed the Military Science Basic Course or had any previous military training can still qualify for entry into the Advanced Course if he or she has at least two academic years remaining in the degree program. Attendance at the 4-week summer internship, Leadership Training Course, qualifies students for the Advanced Course. Students who elect to attend LTC at Fort Knox, KY, also receive a salary while in the course, have meals and housing provided by the Army, and receive reimbursement for travel to and from the course. As an incentive, students can compete for a 2-year Army ROTC scholarship while at LTC. These scholarships are awarded on the basis of college academic record, leadership potential, and performance at the LTC. Additionally, EU students can receive 5 credit hours for attending LTC (see MILS 225).

JROTC

JROTC graduates may also qualify for advanced placement for up to 1/2 of the Basic Course if a minimum of 6 semesters of JROTC have been successfully completed. A student may achieve advanced placement into the Advanced Course after 8 semesters of JROTC.

Uniforms and Textbooks

All textbooks are supplied for all military science courses. When required, uniforms and equipment are provided on loan. If required, freshman and sophomore students are furnished uniforms. Advanced Course students are furnished both uniforms and accessory items. Soldiers who are members of reserve units wear the issued uniforms of their units.

Minor

Military Science minor may be earned after two years of course work. To meet all requirements for a minor, students must complete no less than 15 hours, including MILS 301 (3), 302 (3), 401 (3), 402 (3), and HIST 490 (3).

Military Science Courses (MILS)

101. INTRODUCTION TO MILITARY SCIENCE (2)

History, organization, and mission of the U.S. Army and the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), rappelling techniques, basic rifle and pistol familiarization, map reading, and understanding the role of the U.S. Army today. Prerequisite: Fewer than 50 semester hours or permission of professor.

102. INTRODUCTION TO BASIC MILITARY SKILLS (2)

Rifle marksmanship, advanced rappelling techniques, introduction to small unit tactics, military leadership, and basic military skills. Prerequisite: Fewer than 50 semester hours or permission of professor.

125. LEADERSHIP FITNESS (1)

Development of an individual fitness program and acquisition of the skills necessary to lead group fitness training. May be used to satisfy 1 credit hour of the Physical Education requirement in General Education. May be repeated for a total of 2 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

211. MILITARY FUNDAMENTALS PRACTICUM (2)

Pistol and rifle marksmanship, rappelling, map reading (including the compass), first aid, tactics, leadership, land navigation, wilderness survival skills, and physical fitness and well-being. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

212. BASIC MILITARY SCIENCE FUNDAMENTALS (2)

Organization and mission of ROTC; the role of the U.S. Army in American policy and the application of the principles of war; leadership theory and practice; military operations and basic tactics; instruction in marksmanship, rappelling, first aid, land navigation, drill and ceremonies, and oral and written communication skills. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

225. BASIC MILITARY SCIENCE PRACTICUM (5)

Four-week course conducted at Fort Knox, KY. Training is intensive with emphasis on leadership development, orienteering, and physical conditioning. Small unit tactics and weapons instruction. Requires active participation by all students. Compensation for travel, lodging, and food. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

Advanced Military Science Courses (MILS)

301. MILITARY LEADERSHIP AND OPERATIONS (3)

Introduction to small unit tactics with principles of military leadership, including theory, responsibilities, techniques, and practice; branches of the U.S. Army; oral presentation techniques; and practice. One required field trip. May not be taken as pass/not pass. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

302. MILITARY SKILL BUILDING (3)

Small unit tactics and applied military leadership. Builds on knowledge gained in MILS 301 with emphasis on the junior leader's duties and responsibilities. Two required field trips. May not be taken as pass/not pass. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

325. ADVANCED MILITARY SCIENCE PRACTICUM (5)

Prerequisite for receiving a commission in the U.S. Army through ROTC and for Military Science 411 and 412. Four-week course conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington. Instruction, training, and evaluation focus on the professional development required to become an Army officer. Primary focus on evaluating the student's leadership potential through a mentally and physically demanding camp. Training and evaluation conducted 7 days per week for 5 weeks. Requires active participation by all students. A student is placed in leadership positions which require him/her to lead up to 120 fellow students for extended periods of time. Compensation for travel, lodging, and food.

411. DEVELOPMENTAL LEADERSHIP (3)

Ethics and professionalism of the military officer, Army Command staff functions, oral presentation techniques and practice, military leadership at junior officer level, and world change and military obligations. One required field trip. May not be taken as pass/not pass. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

412. ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP (3)

Military justice system, army supply and logistics procedures and responsibilities, officer management system, obligations and responsibilities of a military officer, and military leadership at junior officer level. Two required field trips. May not be taken as pass/not pass. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

496. READINGS/RESEARCH IN MILITARY SCIENCE (1)

Planned readings and research on subjects in or related to Military Science. May be repeated for a total of 3 hours. May not be taken as pass/not pass. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.