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Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries

Evangel University’s Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries draws upon Central Bible College, Assemblies of God Theological Seminary, and Evangel University’s combined experience in preparing pastors, missionaries, chaplains, and Christian scholars for Spirit-empowered leadership worldwide.  Integrating the best of all three traditions, students receive enhanced ministerial education in a variety of traditional, hybrid, and accelerated formats.  Everything from associate to doctoral degrees are available to students.

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in Biblical Studies, Church Leadership, Inercultural Studies (Missions) Youth Ministry, and Philosophy. Any of these can function as a terminal degree or may be designed as a pre-seminary program with appropriate elective courses. Master’s and doctoral degrees are offered through Assemblies of God Theological Seminary.

In Evangel's "4+1" program, a student may earn a BA or a BS in Church Leadership or Preaching, leading to an accelerated Master of Arts degree in Church Leadership from AGTS in a total of five years.  The "4+1" program is also an option for students who earn a BA or BS in Biblical Studies, leading to an accelerated Master of Arts in Theological Studies degree from AGTS.  Contact the department of Theology and Global Church Ministries for additional information and a degree plan.

In association with the Center for Holy Land Studies, the department offerers enhanced contextual learning in the land of the Bible.

Core Curriculum

To fulfill its stated purpose, EU prepares Christian men and women to be effective in the ministries of local churches, in their families, in their careers, and in their role as citizens. To this end, all students are required to take 18 credit hours of biblical and theological studies as part of the Core Curriculum total of 53 - 59 credits (depending on your desired program). The 18-credit requirement is met by the following sequence of 3-credit courses: BIBL 111, 115, and 116, and one course in the BIBL 360s-370s seriesm ICST 350, and THEO 320. New students are expected to take BIBL 111 in their first semester and to complete BIBL 115 and 116 within their first 4 semesters. Students are expected to complete one course from the BIBL 360s-370s series by the end of their junior year.  English proficiency is required for all book studies. Because the curriculum of biblical and theological studies is integral to the mission of EU, students who do not plan to graduate from Evangel still are expected to take courses from this sequence during their semesters of residence at the university.

Ministerial Credentials: A credentialing seminar is available to all Evangel students and may be taken following the completion of the Core Curriculum. It is recommended no earlier than the first semester of the student’s senior year. Upon satisfactory completion of the Core Curriculum and the credentialing seminar and according to the policy of The General Council of the Assemblies of God, students who earn a Bachelor’s degree from Evangel have satisfied all educational expectations for ministerial credentials with the Assemblies of God as outlined by the General Presbytery. This policy applies only to the ministerial licensing level of credentials. In order to receive a higher level of credentials the student must review the policy of the District in which they are seeking credentials.

Biblical Studies Programs

Because the Bible stands at the center of Evangel University's curriculum, the courses required in the Biblical Studies program are designed 1) to help students understand the content of the Old and New Testaments, 2) to provide tools that help students carefully and wisely interpret these Scriptures, 3) to increase students' understanding of Christian theology and, in particular, to develop an appreciation of the Pentecostal/charismatic tradition, and 4) to lay the foundation for Christ-centered decision-making in the home, within a fellowship of believers, in the workplace, and as active citizens.

Evangel offers a major, a concentration, and a minor in Biblical Studies.  For all programs in Biblical Studies, the Department specifies how Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Each student should work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor from the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

The Biblical Studies major consists of 30 semester credits beyond general education requirements and can be earned as either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.

In order to complete the Bachelor of Arts degree, the following courses are required:

BIBL 111, 115, 116, 296, 337, and two of 360s-370s, ICST 350, one of THEO 334-337, 320, 360, 434, 445 and 446, and six upper-division elective credits with BIBL, CHMN, GREK, HEBR, ICST, JWST, PHIL, RELG, SERV, or THEO prefixes.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 10 hours of Greek or Hebrew
  • 9 hours of Philosophy, including one upper-division course

In order to complete the Bachelor of Science degree, the following courses are required:

BIBL 111, 115, 116, 296, 337, and two of 360s-370s, ICST 350, one of THEO 320, 360, 434, at least one of THEO 334, 335, 336, 337, 444, 445 or 446, and 6 upper-division elective credits with BIBL, CHMN, GREK, HEBR, ICST, JWST, PHIL, RELG, SERV, or THEO prefixes.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • BIBL 353 Intro to Biblical Languages and Software
  • A 3 credit Technology-related course
  • 9 hours of Philosophy, including one upper-division course

The Biblical Studies concentration consists of 30 semester credits, including designated general eduation requirements. The concentration consists of the following courses:

BIBL 111, 115, 116, 296, 337, and one of 360s-370s, ICST 350, THEO 320, 434, at least one of THEO 334, 335, 336, 337, 444, 445, or 446, and 3 upper-division elective credits with BIBL, CHMN, GREK, HEBR, ICST, JWST, PHIL, RELG, SERV, or THEO prefixes.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 6 hours of Philosophy

The Biblical Studies minor consists of a minimum of 24 credits. The minor consists of the following courses:

BIBL 111, 115, 116, and one of 360s-370s, ICST 350, THEO 320, BIBL 296 and 3 upper-division elective credits with BIBL, CHMN, GREK, HEBR, ICST, JWST, PHIL, RELG, SERV, or THEO prefixes. An option includes substituting one year of a biblical language for BIBL 296 and an upper-division elective. Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program for the Biblical Studies minor in consultation with an advisor from the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

Biblical Studies Courses (BIBL)

BIBL 296 and all courses above 300 require English proficiency.

111. ESSENTIAL CHRISTIANITY (3)

An introduction to some of the central concerns of the Christian life with emphasis on three main areas: 1) spiritual growth, 2) the integration of faith and learning as a way of developing a Christian worldview, and 3) finding one's place in life in response to God's call. BIBL 115 or BIBL 116 may be taken concurrently with BIBL 111.

115. OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE (3)

An introductory analytical survey of the Old Testament in its historical-cultural and literary context. BIBL 111 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIBL 115.

116. NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE (3)

An introductory analytical survey of the New Testament in its historical-cultural and literary context. BIBL 111 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIBL 116.

296. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR (3)

An introduction to elementary principles of biblical interpretation and theological research methods with emphasis on study of English language versions of the Bible. Prerequisite: Sophomore status and English proficiency.

337. HERMENEUTICS (3)

An intensive study and application of biblical interpretation. Prerequisite for all students: Two semesters of Hebrew or Greek, BIBL 296, and ENGL 212, or Permission of Professor.

350. GEOGRAPHY OF ISRAEL (3)

A study of the physical geography of Israel: its topography, natural regional divisions, major cities and roadways, neighbors, defenses, climate, crops, rainfall, soil-types, produce, and demographics to help develop awareness of dynamics biblical authors assume their readers already know. Use of state-of-the-art digitized satellite and video imagery to create a "virtual" Israel every class period. Prerequisite: BIBL 115 or BIBL 116.

351. SURVEY OF INTERTESTAMENTAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE (3)

An overview of the history of Israel in the Intertestamental Period. In addition, the student is introduced to representative selections from the various literary genres of the period upon which reconstructions of its history are based. The historical and literary data are then employed in comparative analysis and New Testament interpretation. Prerequisite: BIBL 116 and 296, or Permission of Professor.

352. JEWISH BACKGROUNDS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT (3)

A topical study of the Palestinian Jewish backgrounds of the history, culture, languages, religion, and institutions of the New Testament which are crucial to its understanding, but which go unexplained in the Bible itself. Prerequisite: BIBL 115 and BIBL 296, or Permission of Professor.

353. INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL LANGUAGES AND SOFTWARE (3)

An overview of the alphabet, morphology, grammar, and syntax of New Testament Greek and Old Testament Hebrew, plus intensive and extensive use of a biblical software package, enabling the student both to use intelligently the standard scholarly tools of biblical studies and to apply the benefits of computing technology to the task of interpreting Scripture. The student must own a PC or Mac Computer so as to make use of the Bible software package required.

355. THE WORLD OF THE BIBLE (3)

An onsite field and Bible Study in Israel and Jordan with emphasis on geographical characteristics of the land as well as historical, archeological, and cultural features which shaped the world of the Bible, its events, and message. Prerequisites BIBL 111, 115, 116, and 296, or Permission of Professor.

360-369. OLD TESTAMENT BIBLICAL STUDIES (3)

Selected and concentrated studies in Old Testament books or problems, including readings surveying the entire Old Testament. Each course includes a unit on procedures for interpreting the Bible. Each year, the department selects the specific studies to be offered. The specific course title will be listed on the transcript. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115.

370-379. NEW TESTAMENT BIBLICAL STUDIES (3)

Selected and concentrated studies in New Testament books or problems, including readings surveying the entire New Testament. Each course includes a unit on procedures for interpreting the Bible. Each year, the department selects the studies to be offered. The specific course title will be listed on the transcript. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 116.

450. THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND THE NEW TESTAMENT (3)

The history of the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, subsequent Scrolls scholarship, the identity and beliefs of the sect, the contents of the Scrolls, how the Scrolls apply to Biblical Studies, how to interpret Scrolls texts, and how to use the information contained in the Scrolls to more accurately reconstruct intertestamental Judaism. Emphasis on comparative use of the Scrolls in New Testament interpretation. Prerequisite: BIBL 115 and BIBL 296, or Permission of Professor.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES 1-3

Selected topics in biblical studies, including issues relating to hermeneutical methodology, textual criticism, textual transmission, historical setting, or background to the text. The specific course title will be listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: BIBL 296 or Permission of Professor.

290/490. READINGS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES (1-3)

An individualized program of reading and writing in biblical literature under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisite: Written permission of the department chair, the student's academic advisor, and the supervising professor.

496. BIBLICAL STUDIES SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Religion Courses (RELG)

All courses above 300 require English proficiency.

334. COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS (3)

(Cross-listed as ANTH 334.) A study of the living religions of the world. Compares their backgrounds, philosophies, teachings, and influences, and examines their relations to the Christian faith.

350. THE JEWISH HOLOCAUST (3)

The events of and issues related to the Jewish Holocaust through oral history, poetry, media, and other reflections. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

433. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APOLOGETICS (3)

(Cross-listed as PHIL 433.) A critical examination of topics in the philosophy of religion such as the relation of faith to reason, the arguments for God's existence, the problem of evil, the nature of miracles, the historicity of the resurrection, and the challenge of religious pluralism. Special attention will be given to the coherence of Christian theism and its effective communication. Prerequisite: Three (3) credits of philosophy.

435. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)

(Cross-listed as SOCI 435.) Overview of the study of religion and the church from a sociological perspective. Theories about religion and society with a focus on church attendance, secularization, and social change. Prerequisite: SOCI 111.

439. PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)

(Cross-listed as PSYC 439.) Thinking psychologically about religious phenomena from the perspective of evangelical Christianity. The assumptions and methods in psychological approaches to the study of religious beliefs, experience, and behaviors as they relate to integration of psychology and theology. A review of research findings by applying constructs to selected aspects of religious behavior. Prerequisite: Junior status and PSYC 112 or PSCY 138.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RELIGION (1-3)

Selected topics in the study of religion, including particular religious traditions, themes, texts, or issues. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: BIBL 296 or Permission of Professor.

290/490. READINGS IN RELIGION (1-3)

Individualized reading and writing in religion under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisites: Written permission of the department chair, the student's academic advisor, and the supervising professor.

496. SEMINAR IN RELIGION (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Theology Courses (THEO)

All courses above 300 require English proficiency.

320. PENTECOST (3)

This interdisciplinary course asks, "How do stories shape our lives?" with special attention to the role of the Holy Spirit in personal transformation as demonstrated in the Pentecostal movement. Students engage in reading and writing spiritual and personal biographies and autobiographies to grasp the importance of "bearing witness" not only to the Pentecostal movement but also in the world at large and in their own lives. Pre-requisite BIBL 111, 115 and 116.

334. THE EARLY CHURCH (3)

Early Christian leaders and their thought from A.D. 100 to 600. Special attention to the first four ecumenical Councils. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, 116, and one PHIL course.

335. THE MIDDLE AGES AND BEGINNINGS OF RENEWAL (3)

The development of theology and doctrine throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance with special attention to Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Wycliffe, and Hus. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, 116, and one PHIL course.

336. THE REFORMATION AND ENLIGHTENMENT (3)

Analysis of theological renewal in the lives of Luther, Zwingli, the Anabaptists, Calvin, and Elizabethan-American Puritans. Attention to free church origins, Pietism, Protestant scholasticism, and the Counter-Reformation. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, 116, and one PHIL course.

337. CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (3)

Analysis of theology from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, 116, and one PHIL course.

344. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY (3)

A survey of the methodologies, history, basic issues, and foundational content of the discipline. Includes treatment of the continuity and discontinuity between the Old and New Testaments, the progressive unfolding of the history of redemption against the backdrop of creation and sin, and the Bible as presenting a unified story of God's purposes for the people of the world as those purposes reach their fulfillment in Christ. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, and 116.

360. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY SURVEY (3)

An intensive survey of systematic theology with a view to articulating a strategic summary of its major themes from revelation to eschatology, and explicating the logical coherence of a Christian worldview. Prerequisites: BIBL 111, 115, 116.

434. PENTECOSTAL FOUNDATIONS (3)

An intensive study of the history and theology of Pentecostalism. Prerequisite: THEO 320.

440. THEOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN LITERATURE (3)

(Cross-listed with ENGL 440.) Integrative study of theology through literature. Highlights major Christian writers of the Western world. Frequently includes emphasis on the thought and writings of C.S. Lewis.

445. OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (3)

An exposition of major Old Testament themes with special attention to hermeneutical issues and key figures in Old Testament study. Prerequisite: BIBL 337.

446. NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (3)

An exposition of major New Testament themes with special attention to hermeneutical issues and key figures in New Testament study. Prerequisite: BIBL 337.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEOLOGY (1-3)

Special topics in theology, including particular theological traditions, themes, texts, or issues. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: BIBL 296 or Permission of Professor.

290/490. READINGS IN THEOLOGY (1-3)

Individualized reading and writing in theological literature under the direction of a professor in the department. Prerequisites: Permission of department chair, student's academic advisor, and supervising professor.

496. THEOLOGY SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Biblical Languages Programs

Biblical Studies: Language Track major is offered both in conjunction with a Biblical Studies Major, or as a stand-alone major. A Biblical Languages minor is also available.  These programs are designed to prepare students for either graduate study or vocational ministry.

The Biblical Languages track for the Biblical Studies major consists of 31 credits. The Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. The major consists of the following courses:

  • GREK 115-116 Elementary Hellenistic Greek (10 credits)
  • HEBR 115-116 Elementary Biblical Hebrew (10 credits)
  • 9 additional credits (three terms) of either GREK or HEBR
  • Six upper division (300 or 400 level) elective credits from the following: GREK, HEBR, Aramaic, Biblical Exegesis, Linguistics or Hermeneutics
  • Other courses approved by the Department

The Biblical Languages minor consists of 22 credits of Biblical Hebrew and/or Biblical Greek.  Requirements for the minor include GREK/HEBR 115 and 116 (5 credits each), 315 and 316 (3 credits each), and 415 and 416 (3 credits each).

Possible ways to fulfill the requirements of the minor:

  • Three semesters of one biblical language and two semesters of the other biblical language
  • Three years of Biblical Hebrew
  • Three years of Biblical (Hellenistic) Greek

Biblical Language Courses:

Greek Courses (GREK)

115-116. ELEMENTARY HELLENISTIC GREEK (5)

An intensive study of elementary grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected readings from the New Testament and other Hellenistic writings.

315-316. INTERMEDIATE HELLENISTIC GREEK (3)

Selected readings from various genre of the New Testament and other Hellenistic writings with attention to building vocabulary and expanding understanding of syntax. Translation and exegetical procedures help students develop a theological understanding of Scripture. Prerequisite: GREK 115-116 or equivalent.

415-416. ADVANCED HELLENISTIC GREEK (3)

Selected readings from various genre of the New Testament and other Hellenistic writings, including an emphasis on exegesis, textual criticism, and theological application. Prerequisites: GREK 315 and 316 or equivalent.

490-491. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN GREEK (1-3)

Individualized reading program in Hellenistic Greek under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisites: Permission of Professor, Advisor, and Department Chairperson.

496. GREEK STUDIES SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Hebrew Courses (HEBR)

115-116. ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW (5)

An intensive study of biblical Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with selected readings from the Old Testament.

315-316. INTERMEDIATE BIBLICAL HEBREW (3)

Selected readings from various genre of the Old Testament with attention to building vocabulary and expanding understanding of syntax. Translation and exegetical procedures help students develop a theological understanding of Scripture. Prerequisite: HEBR 115 and 116 or equivalent.

415-416. ADVANCED BIBLICAL HEBREW (3)

Study of a particular genre in the Old Testament, including an emphasis on exegesis, textual criticism, and theological application. Prerequisite: HEBR 315 and 316 or equivalent.

490-491. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN BIBLICAL HEBREW (1-3)

Individualized reading program in biblical Hebrew under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisites: Permission of Professor, Advisor, and Department Chairperson.

496. HEBREW STUDIES SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Jewish Studies program (JWST)     

The Department of Bible and Theology offers a minor in Jewish studies designed to promote an understanding of all aspects of Jewish life, culture, language, literature, religion, and history from biblical times to the modern era. Each student works out an individual program in consultation with a Jewish Studies advisor in the Department of Bible and Theology. Students preparing for graduate school in this area should also consider a Hebrew minor or a Biblical Languages major.

The Jewish Studies minor consists of 18 credits: 12 credits must be upper-division (300 or 400 level) courses. The following courses may be applied to the minor:

  • BIBL 115 Old Testament Literature
  • BIBL/JWST 350 Geography of Israel
  • BIBL/JWST 351 Survey of Intertestamental History and Literature
  • BIBL/JWST 352 Jewish Backgrounds of the New Testament
  • BIBL/JWST 450 The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament
  • HEBR 300- and 400-level Intermediate and Advanced Biblical Hebrew
    (a maximum of 6 HEBR credits may be applied to the minor)
  • HIST 478 History of the Modern Middle East
  • RELG 334 Comparative Religions
  • RELG 350 The Jewish Holocaust

Although all transfer courses must by approved by the Department, the following types of transfer courses usually apply to the minor: Aramaic, Archaeology (including credits for digs), Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinics, and Manners and Customs of the Bible.

In addition, a student may propose other courses or directed readings, subject to Departmental approval.

Philosophy Programs

The Department offers a major, a concentration, and a minor in Philosophy. These programs prepare students for graduate study and develop analytic and critical tools, as well as training influential systems of thought that are essential for any academic endeavor.  

 

All courses above 300 require English proficiency.

For all programs in Philosophy, the department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Students are advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor in the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

The Philosophy major consists of 33 credits.  The major includes the following courses:

  • PHIL 110 and 111
  • PHIL 115
  • PHIL 335, 336, and 337
  • PHIL 118 or PHIL 334
  • THEO 360
  • 9 upper-division elective credits with PHIL prefixes

 

The Philosophy concentration consists of 24 credits. The concentration includes the following courses:

  • PHIL 110 or 111
  • PHIL 115
  • At least two courses from PHIL 335, 336, or 337
  • 12 elective credits with PHIL prefixes

The Philosophy minor consists of 18 credits. The minor includes the following courses:

  • PHIL 110 or 111
  • PHIL 115
  • PHIL 335, 336, or 337
  • 9 elective credits with PHIL prefixes

Philosophy Courses (PHIL)

110. INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL REASONING (3)

Exploration of topics in informal and inductive reasoning with emphasis on recognizing and evaluating arguments and fallacies in ordinary, literary, and scientific contexts.

111. INTRODUCTION TO DEDUCTIVE LOGIC (3)

Systematic study of the principles of correct thinking, focusing on deductive reasoning. Attention to symbolic logic, proofs of validity, and beginning predicate logic.

115. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)

Introduction to the principal systems, basic problems, and terminology of philosophy.

118. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)

Introduction to ethics, ethical problems, and major ethical systems.

230. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3)

(Cross-listed as GSCI 230.) History and philosophy of science and their effects on the practice of science today. Provides an understanding of the logic and operation of science.

334. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)

(Cross-listed as GOVT 334.) Foundational principles of Western political and social philosophy, including such philosophers as Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx.

335. ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (3)

Foundations of Western thinking in the Classical Greek period with emphasis on Plato and Aristotle, including their political thought. Prerequisite: three credits of philosophy.

336. MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (3)

Medieval philosophy, A.D. 400 to 1600, with a detailed analysis of the Scholastic period. Emphasis on Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, and William of Ockham. Prerequisite: three credits of philosophy.

337. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY (3)

A strategic survey of western philosophy from Descartes through Plantinga. Special attention will be given to the important issues giving rise to the development of rationalism, empiricism, existentialism, postmodernism and other important schools of philosophy.

365. AESTHETICS (3)

A study of the nature of art and beauty, including that of the natural world. Key figures in the history of philosophy will be examined chronologically for theories regarding the nature of beauty, art, taste and the aesthetic experience. The Christian apologetic value of art and beauty will then be assessed.

415. METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY (3)

A study of key topics and problems in metaphysics including general ontology, the mind-body problem and free will. Epistemology topics will include the nature of knowledge and the attending issues of foundationalism and coherentism, as well as the problem of skepticism.

433. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APOLOGETICS (3)

(Cross-listed as RELG 433.)A critical examination of topics in the philosophy of religion such as the relation of faith to reason, the arguments for God's existence, the problem of evil, the nature of miracles, the historicity of the resurrection, and the challenge of religious pluralism. Special attention will be given to the coherence of Christian theism and its effective communication. Prerequisite: PHIL 115.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY (1-3)

Selected studies in philosophical methodology, history, axiology, and special area studies. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: Junior status and permission of professor.

290/490. READINGS IN PHILOSOPHY (1-3)

Individualized reading and writing in philosophical literature under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisite: PHIL 115 or equivalent, as well as written permission of department chair, student's academic advisor, and supervising professor.

496. PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

Jerusalem University College

Evangel University is associated with the Jerusalem University College, an institution offering specialized instruction in historical geography, archaeology, biblical and Semitic languages, and the history of the Holy Land. Subscribing to the historic Christian faith in the evangelical and non-denominational tradition, Jerusalem University College offers graduate and undergraduate programs of study at its campus on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, Israel.

Students who have completed one year of study at EU may study for a semester at Jerusalem University College as part of a "Semester Abroad" program. Courses in the history, geography, culture, religions, and languages of ancient biblical times and the modern Middle East provide rich insights into the past and meaningful cross-cultural experience.

Where applicable, credits earned at Jerusalem University College are accepted at Evangel University upon review by the Records and Registration Office in consultation with the appropriate Department chair.

Detailed information about specific courses offered by Jerusalem University College may be found on its website www.juc.edu or from the Chair of the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

Bible Lands Study Program

Evangel students have the unique opportunity to study in the land of the Bible. Approximately every year, 2- to 3-week study trips (length varies from year to year) are taken to Israel, Egypt, and Jordan to study the Scriptures in their original contexts. Led by Theology and Global Church Ministries Department faculty, these experiences help students develop life-long tools to better understand the message of the Bible. Students have the option of earning 3 or 6 semester hours of credit through the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

Church Ministries Program

Following in the Great tradition of Central Bible College, the Church Ministries Programs provide holistic Bible-based leadership programs to ensure the Body of Christ is being effectively matured and strengthened. Opportunities abound for well-prepared ministers who are thoughtful, passionate, and skilled in reaching their world with the love of Jesus Christ.

Evangel and CBC have equipped some of the world’s great ministers and missionaries, helping them develop Bible-based thinking and reasoning, Holy Spirit inspired passion and compassion, and polished skills in preaching, teaching and leadership.

Professors in the Theology and Global Church Ministries department build on unique and diverse experiences in the local church and on the mission field when preparing and teaching courses. Evangel’s embedded seminary also provides direct access to pursuing a graduate degree.

Church Leadership Tracks

The department offers a major, a concentration, and a minor in Church Ministries. All Church Ministries programs, but particularly the majors, are designed for those who are seeking to serve as leaders in the local church. They are intended to provide students with broad-based skill sets necessary for vocational, spiritual leaders.

For all Church Ministries programs, the Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Each student should work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor from the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

The Church Ministires (Leadership track) major is a comprehensive degree and consists of 53 semester credits and can be earned as either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The major consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, 337, Synoptic Gospels, Acts, Romans, CHMN 303, 311, 313, 320, 411, 420,  498, ICST 111, THEO 360, 444, either THEO 445 or 446,  Apologetics and World Religions, PSYC 323, and 3 cr hours of Church Ministries elective.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • PHIL elective
  • 6-8 hours of Greek or Hebrew (B.A. degree only)
  • Intro to Biblical Languages and Software (B.S. degree only)
  • Science elective (B.S. degree only)

The Church Leadership concentration consists of 27 semester credits. The concentration consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, CHMN 303, 311, 313 320, Pastoral Counseling, and 9 Church Ministries elective credits. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Rhetoric (3)
  • 3 hours of Philosophy

The Church Leadership minor consists of 18 credits. The minor consists of the following courses:

CHMN 303, 311, 320, and 9 elective credits with a CHMN prefix. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries program advisor.

Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program for the Church Leadership minor in consultation with an advisor from the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

Church Ministries Courses (CHMN)

303. PENTECOSTAL LEADERSHIP (3)

This course provides practical guidelines for all, regardless of ministerial position, who feel the call to lead God's people. The students will be introduced to the biblical characteristics of the leader by examining major and minor figures of both Testaments from a biblical-theological approach. Issues to be discussed will include leadership development, integrity, vision, Spirit-empowerment, servanthood, modeling, in addition to current leadership trends and/or methodologies in the church.

311. GREAT COMMISSION CHALLENGES I (3)

A biblical theology of the Great Commission. The course presents an in-depth study of evangelism and discipleship principles with special emphasis on the integration of these disciplines within the context of the local Pentecostal church. Emphasis is given to the presentation of a biblical, God-centered Gospel and our Lord's approach to disciple-making.

318. PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND CHURCH GOVERNMENT (3)

Biblical foundations of church governance are explored. Attention is also given to modern presbyterial, congregational, and Episcopal forms of church government. Specific attention is given to the structure and organization of the Assemblies of God in the United States including its Constitution and Bylaws. The unique tasks and functions of pastoral ministry such as weddings, funerals, baptisms, baby dedications and additional aspects of pastoral care are included.

320. HOMILETICS I (3)

Technical aspects of the sermon and its preparation. A survey is made of the various kinds of sermons. Emphasis is given to the analysis of student prepared outlines.

411. SENIOR CAPSTONE (3)

A capstone course to assist graduating students entering vocational ministry. Focuses on credentialing, incorporation, parliamentary procedure, clergy tax, building maintenance, and risk management. Ways to maximize leadership opportunities through the church staff, and fellowship are also discussed. Prerequisite: 90 hours of course work.

420. HOMILETICS II (3)

The practice of the preparation and delivery of sermons. Class criticism takes up a major portion of this course. Attention is given to development of rhetorical elements.

463. PREACHING AND BIBLICAL GENRES (3)

An examination and application of genre-specific hermeneutical and homiletical principles for the preparation and delivery of biblical sermons. Student preaching is a key component of the course.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHURCH MINISTRIES (1-3)

Selected studies in Church Ministries, Youth Ministries, Children's Ministries, or Preaching. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: Junior status and permission of the professor.

Christian Service Courses (SERV)

Christian Service courses prepare students for effective Christian witness and service. As such, they augment, but do not replace, EU's General Education courses in biblical and theological studies. These courses build on a biblical and theological foundation to provide specific strategies for witness and service, particularly for those who intend to serve as lay workers in the church or who wish to work in parachurch organizations. All courses 300 and above require English proficiency.

160. INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN SERVICE (2)

Introduction to the biblical theology of Christian service and survey of contemporary service and ministry opportunities in church and para-church organizations and service agencies. Prerequisite: BIBL 111.

210. DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING (1)

Basic discipleship training. Provides a theological and practical groundwork for participating in the local church and sharing one's faith in the community.

224. LAY LEADERSHIP (2)

Study of the total program of the church, including the organizational structure of the denomination. Emphasis on the local church program. Prerequisite: SERV 160.

320. PUBLIC SPEAKING IN THE CHURCH (3)

Preparation of public presentations for use in the church, including sermons, public Bible studies, devotional addresses, and storytelling. Attention to aids and reference sources, types and styles of public presentations in the church, and outlining and constructing public presentations for specific audiences and occasions. Involves preparing and delivering one or more public addresses. Prerequisite: THEO 216 or junior or senior standing.

470-479. CHRISTIAN SERVICE STUDIES (1-3)

Selected studies in methodology, history, or contemporary issues of Christian service and special area studies. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: Junior status and permission of professor.

480-489. SPECIAL SERVICE TOPICS (1-3)

Selected studies in methodology, history, or contemporary issues of community service and special area studies. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: Junior status and permission of professor.

290/490. READINGS IN SERVICE (1-3)

Individualized reading and writing in literature in the fields of church ministry or community service under the direction of a faculty member in the student's major. Prerequisite: Permission of student's academic advisor and supervising professor.

496. SERVICE SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

498. SERVICE PRACTICUM (1-3)

Supervised field experience in a church, service organization, or other institutional setting for a practical application of the nature and scope of service. Prerequisite: Junior status and permission of program coordinator.

Youth Ministry Programs

The Department offers a major, a concentration, and a minor in Youth Ministries. All Youth Ministries programs, but particularly the major, are designed to equip and prepare students for comprehensive ministry focused on youth. Graduates from this program are expected to serve as leaders in ministries that will impact students who are junior high school age through college age.

For all Youth Ministry programs, the Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Each student should work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor from the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

The Youth Ministries major is a comprehensive degree and consists of 53 semester credits and can be earned as either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The major consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, 337, Synoptic Gospels, Acts, Romans, CHMN 203, 303, 313, 320, 323, 333, 393, 420, 433, 498, 412, THEO 360, and 445 or 446.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • PSYC 235 is recommended for the Social Science elective
  • 3 hours of Philosophy
  • 6-8 hours of a Foreign Language, Greek or Hebrew (B.A. degree only)
  • Intro to Biblical Languages and Software (B.S. degree only)
  • Science elective (B.S. degree only)

The Youth Ministries concentration consists of 27 semester credits. The concentration consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, CHMN 203, 323, 333, 393, 320, 412, 433, Adolescent Ethnography, and 3 Church Ministries elective credits. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 3 hours of Philosophy

The Youth Ministries minor consists of 18 credits. The minor consists of the following courses:

CHMN 203, 323, 333, 393, and 6 Church Ministries elective credits. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries Department Chair.

Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program for the Youth minor in consultation with an advisor from the Department of Church Ministries.

Youth Ministry Courses (CHMN)

203. STRATEGIC YOUTH MINISTRY (3)

Provides a comprehensive philosophy of youth ministry. The call of a youth pastor, goal setting, and developing a personal philosophy of youth ministry are covered. Students learn to develop a youth ministry consistent with their philosophy of youth ministry. For Youth Ministry majors, aspects of this course take place from within the residential component of the Youth Ministry Learning community.

323. YOUTH IN MINISTRY (3)

This course places emphasis on involving youth in ministry within the context of the local church. It considers aspects of equipping youth for personally participating in various ministries of the church, including the discovery and implementation of spiritual gifts and natural abilities, the engagement of active contributions towards the mission of the larger community of faith, applying theological information towards fulfilling Biblical mandates, and living missionally as a lifestyle. Prerequisite: CHMN 203

333. YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP (3)

Developing an effective strategy for youth discipleship. Emphasis is on discipling and the mentoring of youth advisors and students. Other emphases include developing a discipleship program that will lead students in developing a sustainable devotional life that extends beyond the youth ministry years.

393. YOUTH EVANGELISM (3)

The personal evangelization of youth and ministry on the senior high school campus. Students study the legal and practical aspects of access and acceptable activities. The course also acquaints the student with Chi Alpha, the Assemblies of God ministry to the secular college campuses.

Children’s Ministry Programs

The Department offers a major, a concentration, and a minor in Children’s Ministries. All Children’s Ministries programs, but particularly the major, are designed for those who are seeking to minister to children within the context of the local church and beyond. They are intended to provide students with broad-based skill sets necessary for ministry to children in the 21st Century.

For all Children's ministry programs, the Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Each student should work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor from the Church Ministries program.

The Church Ministries (Children’s and Family track) major is a comprehensive degree and consists of 56 semester credits and can be earned as either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The major consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, Synoptic Gospels, Acts, Romans, CHMN 303, 311, 313, 320, 326, 411, 420, 498, Children's Ministry elective, ENGL 330, SOCI 336, either EDUC 299 or EDUC 221, THEO 360, and 445 or 446.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 3 hours of Philosophy
  • PSYC 234 or PSYC 237 is recommended as a replacement for PSYC 138 Psychology of Healthy Relationships
  • 6-8 hours of a Foreign Language, Greek or Hebrew (B.A. degree only)
  • Intro to Biblical Languages and Software (B.S. degree only)
  • Science elective (B.S. degree only)

The Children’s Ministries concentration consists of 27 semester credits. The concentration consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, CHMN 326, 311, 320, 411, ENGL 330, PSYC 234, SOCI 336, and either EDUC 221 or 299, and 3 Church Ministries elective credits. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 3 hours of Philosophy

The Children’s Ministries minor consists of 18 credits. The minor consists of the following courses:

CHMN 311, 326,EDUC 299, PSYC 234, SOCI 336 and 3 Children's Ministries elective credits. Elective courses must be approved by the Church Ministries program advisor.

Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program for the Children’s minor in consultation with an advisor from the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

Children’s Ministry Courses (CHMN)

326. FOUNDATIONS OF CHILDREN'S MINISTRIES (3)

Surveys programs, planning and outreach strategies, and basic concepts of ministering to children in the current culture. Seeks to provide an understanding of biblical basis and concepts of ministering to children, role of the parents in children's ministries, and role of the Children's Pastor with regard to lay leaders/workers, Senior Pastor and other staff members, parents/guardians, and the church in general.

353. BUILDING CHILDREN'S MINISTRIES (3)

Planning and promoting programs and events that minister to children. Includes instruction on using puppets, video, human video, and drama. Fundraising and budgeting are covered as well as developing children's church services, vacation Bible schools, neighborhood outreaches, disciplining children, and ministering to families.

366. METHODS OF TEACHING THE BIBLE TO CHILDREN (3)

Methods and strategies for communicating biblical truth to children through grade six. Specific methods of Bible study are examined along with how these methods apply to various types of biblical literature. Students have opportunity to apply course content by constructing and presenting lessons.

376. AGE LEVEL DISCIPLESHIP (3)

Age Level Discipleship is intended to provide a foundational and clear understanding of discipleship as a continuous process from birth through adulthood. Various aspects of ministry to families as well as individuals are considered within the context of the local church. This course should be completed prior to the internship.

423. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3)

The philosophy, purposes, and aims of curriculum. Special attention is given to the development of curriculum and related materials for Christian schools, and hands on experience with existing curricular materials such as Radiant Life, A Beka, Bob Jones, Alpha Omega, and ACE.

465. PHILOSOPHY OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (3)

An examination and normative evaluation of the educational objectives, assumptions, and general principles of contemporary philosophies, considering implications for religious education.

Preaching Programs

The Department offers a major, concentration, and minor in Preaching. All Preaching programs, but particularly the major, are designed for those who are seeking to establish excellent preaching skills in their preparation for vocational ministry. They are intended to provide students with broad-based skill sets necessary for biblical preaching.

For all programs in Church Ministries--Preaching track, the Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Each student should work out an individual program in consultation with an advisor from the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

The Church Ministries (Preaching track) major is a comprehensive degree and consists of 53 semester credits and can be earned as either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The major consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, 337, Synoptic Gospels, Acts, Romans, Systematic Theology Survey, CHMN 311, 313, 320, 411, 420, 463, 6 hours of Preaching electives, Ministerial Internship ICST 111, THEO 434, and 445 or 446, and 3 Church Ministries elective hours. Elective courses must be approved by a Church Ministries program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 3 hours of Philosophy
  • 6-8 hours of Greek or Hebrew (B.A. degree only)
  • Intro to Biblical Languages and Software (B.S. degree only)
  • Science elective (B.S. degree only)

The Preaching concentration consists of 27 semester credits. The concentration consists of the following courses:

BIBL 296, CHMN 311, 320, 411, 420, 463, 6 hours Preaching electives, and 3 Church Ministries elective hours. Elective courses must be approved by a Church Ministries program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • GNST 100 University Seminar (1)
  • ENGL 212 Composition and Literary Analysis (3)
  • 6 hours of Philosophy

The Preaching minor consists of 18 credits. The minor consists of the following courses:

CHMN 320, 420, 463, Great Commission Preaching, and 6 Church Ministries elective hours. Elective courses must be approved by a Church Ministries program advisor.

Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual program for the Peaching minor in consultation with an advisor from the Department of Theology and Global Church Ministries.

Intercultural Studies (Missions) Programs

The Intercultural Studies (Missions) program exists to prepare professional persons (e.g., educators, business persons, diplomats, social workers) and professional missionaries for careers in cross-cultural ministry settings to advance the worldwide evangelistic task of the church. As the "global village" shrinks and the workplace becomes international and multi-national, it is more likely that Christians in a variety of technical and professional disciplines will spend part of their careers in a cross-cultural setting either in the US or abroad. The Intercultural Studies (misions) programs are designed to prepare men and women to do this effectively as skillful workers and as clear communicators of the gospel. The Intercultural Studies (Missions) programs combine studies in Bible, Pentecostal ministry, culture, and communication to equip students for the task of developing new generations of Spirit-empowered disciple-makers across cultural boundaries.

The Intercultural Studies (Missions) Program, which is interdisciplinary in both content and supervision, is tailored to the needs of individual students. Students seeking a major, concentration, or minor in the program must consult an advisor to review required core courses and choose an appropriate set of elective courses called "program electives." (Appropriate elective courses prepare the student for either short-term or career missions.) Students may select program electives from a pre-approved list of courses (see below) or suggest other selections from the University course offerings. A formal Program Proposal must be submitted and approved before a student is accepted officially into the program. The completed Program Proposal must be on file by the time a student has reached the 78-credit-hour point in his or her University career. (See the Intercultural Studies advising form for details.) Any changes in a student's program must also be approved in advance by the Intercultural Studies program director or the Department Chair.

For all programs in Intercultural Studies (Missions), the Department specifies how the Core Curriculum requirements shall be completed. The specific requirements are listed in an advising form available in the Department office. Students are strongly advised to begin as early as possible to work out an individual Intercultural Studies program in consultation with an advisor in the Theology and Global Church Ministries Department.

Pre-approved program electives for all Intercultural Studies (Missions) programs include:

  • Any upper-division (300 or 400 level) ICST course
  • PSYC 439 Psychology of Religion
  • RELG 334 Comparative Religions
  • SOCI 337 The Urban World
  • SOCI 435 Sociology of Religion
  • SWK/PSYC/SOCI 332 Race, Ethnicity and Gender
  • THEO 496 intercultural studies seminar

The Intercultural Studies (Missions) major focuses on an approach to missions through professional specialties such as business, teaching, social work, ESL, nursing, and creative access opportunities. The major will lead to a Bachelor of Arts degree consisting of 29 or 30 semester credits. The major includes the following courses:

Required core courses (21-24 hours):

ICST 111, 211, 310, 311, 335, 498, BIBL 296 or SOCI/SWK 296 (2-3) and 9-11 upper-division elective hours.

Program Electives (9-11 hours): Program electives may be chosen from the list defined for the major. Other courses may be acceptable if they are proposed and approved by the program advisor for Intercultural Studies prior to enrolling in them. However, they must be upper-division courses (300 or 400 level) that have a clear purpose in preparing the student for either short-term or career missions, and they must clearly support the student’s personal statement of vision for missions. (The personal statement of vision for missions should be submitted on the Intercultural Studies Program form available in the Department office.)

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this major. They include the following:

  • RHET 205 Effective Communication (3)
  • 6-8 hours of a foreign language
  • SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • PSYC 138 Psychology of Human Relations (3)
  • PHIL 110, 111, or 115 (3)

The Intercultural Studies (Missions) concentration consists of 24 hours. The concentration includes the following courses:

ICST 111, 211, 310, 311, 335 and 9 upper division elective hours from the list defined as Program Electives for the concentration. Elective courses must be approved by an advisor in the Intercultural Studies program.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are specified for this concentration. They include the following:

  • RHET 205 Effective Communication (3)
  • SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • PSYC 138 Psychology of Human Relations (3)
  • PHIL 110, 111, or 115 (3)

The Intercultural Studies (Missions) minor consists of 21 hours. The minor includes the following:

ICST 111, 211, 310, 311, 335, 350, and 3 upper division elective hours from the list defined as Program Electives for the minor. Elective courses must be approved by an Intercultural Studies program advisor.

Certain Core Curriculum courses are required for the minor. They include the following:

  • RHET 205 Effective Communication (3)
  • SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology (3)
  • PSYC 138 Psychology of Human Relations (3)
  • PHIL 110, 111, or 115 (3)

Intercultural Studies (Missions) Courses (ICST)

111. INTRODUCTION TO INTERCULTURAL MINISTRIES (3)

Introduction to contemporary missions work and its biblical basis.

211. WORKING CROSS-CULTURALLY (3)

Practical aspects of cross-cultural living. Attention to personal and family adjustments and to understanding and living among people whose culture is different from one's own. Prerequisite: ICST 111.

310. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3)

The impact of culture on the communication process. Attention to developing an understanding of the diversity of cultures in the world and of the ways cultural differences influence the ways people interact. Prerequisite: ICST 111.

311. BEST PRACTICES IN MODERN MISSIONS (3)

Missionary history, principles, and methods. Attention to the history of missions of the Assemblies of God. Prerequisites: ICST 111 and either ICST 211 or 310.

335. TEAM BUILDING AND SENDING AGENCIES (3)

An overview of team dynamics and personality development. An examination of a variety of sending agencies with special attention to the policies of the Assemblies of God World Missions and the Assemblies of God Home Missions. Prerequisite: Nine credits of ICST courses.

350. GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (3)

Global Connections is an intercultural studies course focused on equipping students to experience, reflect on, and evaluate cultures other than their own. The course helps students visit and learn from another culture, learn the characteristics of cross-cultural communication, and make meaning for their lives out of immersion and observation in another culture. Prerequisite: junior status or permission of program coordinator.

470-479. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (1-3)

Selected topics in missions studies, including particular themes, texts, issues, and geographical area studies or people groups. Specific course title is listed on the transcript. Prerequisite: Junior status and written permission of program coordinator.

485. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3)

Selected studies in current missions issues or specialized strategies for specific people groups. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or written permission of department chair.

290/490. READINGS IN MISSIONS (1-3)

Individualized program of reading and writing in missions literature under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor, Advisor, and Department Chairperson.

496. INTERCULTURAL STUDIES SEMINAR (1-3)

Selected topics. Prerequisite: Permission of Professor.

498. CROSS-CULTURAL PRACTICUM (1-3)

Supervised field experience in a practical missions setting to expose prospective missionaries to the nature of Christian missions. Prerequisite for Missions Studies majors: Six credit hours of ICST courses. Open only to Intercultural Studies majors. Prerequisite: Six credits of ICST and permission of program coordinator.