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Department of Business

The Department of Business defines business as purposefully bringing together and effectively utilizing people, financial, and other resources to accomplish a mission with excellence. The mission may be either for-profit or nonprofit. Business success requires professionals in accounting, economics, finance, human resources, marketing, and management. The mission of the department is to develop people with the skills and abilities to examine complex business situations with a christian worldview and to act with integrity and character as they serve with excellence in the global marketplace.

Our vision is to be recognized as a premier, faith-based, school of business using great programs to develop great minds in great people who are driven by excellence and inspired by faith to impact the world.  The business department has obtained Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) accreditation after demonstrating the quality of its programs.

Our business programs are personal and practical. Highly qualified instructors become personal advisors to help students recognize career choices and guide them through their course work. Many of the professors have “real world” experience in the areas they teach. Students have opportunities to visit companies, participate in real projects, gain practical experience, and develop team skills through classroom activities and projects, internships, and participation in student-led organizations such as Enactus. Students also have the opportunity to participate in our Student Investment Group which makes the financial decisions for an investment portfolio of more than $400,000.

Best of all, we encourage a Christian worldview of business. We've been doing it this way since the opening of the University in 1955. Our graduates have the values, integrity and character that are highly desired by successful organizations. Our business alumni have distinguished themselves as leaders in all areas of business as well as in their communities and churches. 

The objectives of the Department include the following:

  1. To develop in both students and faculty an awareness of the values, goals, knowledge and skills associated with being successful and fulfilled in business through course work, student advising, seminars, student organizations and activities, internships, mentoring programs, alumni involvement, and other means.
  2. To enable students in all disciplines to enhance their personal and vocational success by providing the opportunity to learn about business and personal finance.
  3. To provide students with a relevant core curriculum of general business subjects along with opportunities for concentrated study in specialized areas that lead to successful business careers in areas where God has given interest and talent.
  4. To train men and women to think effectively and ethically, to form sound business judgments, to develop an understanding of the interrelationships of the various functions of business and society, and to exercise increasing responsibility for society through vocational leadership and service to the community and church.
  5. To encourage Christian character and the application of Christian principles to personal, business, social, and ministry activities.

Degrees and Fields of Study

For traditional students, the Department of Business offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) degree with comprehensive majors in accounting, business education, finance, management, marketing, and nonprofit business & social enterprise. The Department also offers an Associate of Arts in Business Administration degree. Concentrations in accounting, management, marketing, and nonprofit business & social enterprise enable students with another major or concentration to also develop a strong focus in business. Minors in accounting, finance, human resource management, management, marketing, international business, and nonprofit business & social enterprise provide opportunities for business and non-business majors to complement their majors with knowledge in a specific business area.

For working adults, the Business Department offers two programs. The first is an online Associate of Arts program for adults seeking introductory business along with general education courses. The second is for adults with 60 credit hours completed and seeking a business degree.  They can enroll in the accelerated Bachelor of Science in Management program, which is offered as both a seated and online program.

Evangel University has a consortium agreement with Missouri State University (located in Springfield) that enables business majors to pursue a Masters degree in Accountancy, Business Administration, or Health Administration while still completing their undergraduate degree at Evangel.  This program allows qualified students to enroll in up to 9 credit hours in the MSU master's program while also using those credits to fulfill requirements or electives for their major.  Financial aid and billing for courses at MSU are managed as if the courses were taken at Evangel.

To enhance their education, business majors are encouraged to:

  • Be involved in the Department of Business sponsored Students in Enactus and Student Investment Group (SIG) to help develop team-oriented applications of business knowledge through participation in special projects, business study tours, teaching, and service activities.
  • Seek leadership positions within the department organizations and campus organizations and activities such as the Student Goverment Association, Activities Board, CrossWalk, residence halls, and sports teams to gain leadership experience and demonstrate the value of business knowledge in organizing and leading activities. 
  • Plan a summer or semester internship in the area of one's vocational interest before the senior year to help explore God's vocational calling and to enhance job opportunities after graduation.
  • Participate in at least one cross-cultural experience to strengthen a personal commitment to think globally and find fulfillment in service to others with different cultural perspectives.
  • Complete 40 hours of voluntary service to the community and church each year of enrollment to broaden one's understanding of social responsibility.

Scholarships

Students entering their junior and senior years with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher are eligible to apply for Department of Business scholarships and a variety of endowed and private scholarships.  Business alumni and friends have generously committed to provide over $1.8 million in endowed funds to provide business scholarships and support for business faculty and program development.

Study Abroad

Business majors may elect to take some of their business courses while spending a semester or summer abroad through programs approved by Evangel University. Some of these opportunities are offered through the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. See Off Campus Programs under Academic Affairs for further information about these programs.

Evangel's Department of Business is also affiliated with the Consortium of Universities for International Studies (CIMBAItaly) which offers semester and summer programs for undergraduate students in business and economics.  Rigorous, high-quality courses are taught by American professors and are compatible with Evangel's upper division business course requirements.  The program is provided on a campus in a small, northern Italy community, about 30 miles north of Venice.  Courses are scheduled to encourage students to travel throughout Europe.

Business Foundation Requirements

The following Business Foundation courses are required of all majors in the Department of Business except Business Education. In addition to these courses, students are required to take Statistics and Personal Finance as part of the general education curriculum.  The Principles of Macroeconomics course also fulfills the general education requirement for a Behavioral or Social Science elective.

COURSECRCOURSECR
ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 MGMT 331 Business Law I 3
ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics 3 MGMT 332 Business Law II 3
MGMT 235 Organizational Design & MGMT 3 BUED 275 Business Communications 3
ACCT 231 Financial Accounting 3 MRKT 347 International Business 3
ACCT 232 Managerial Accounting 3 FIN 363 Principles of Finance 3
ACCT 239 Spreadsheet Applications 3 MGMT 446 Strategic Management 3
MRKT 239 Principles of Marketing 3 BUSN 496 Senior Seminar 1
Total Hours: 40

Students who have taken high school courses, seminars, or independent study related to ACCT 231, ECON 212, ECON 213, MGMT 235, MGMT 331, and MRKT 239 may choose to meet the requirements for these courses through College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exams.

Accounting

An Accounting major prepares the student for professional service in either public or private accounting or for graduate study. A student planning a career in public, private, or not-for-profit accounting is encouraged to prepare for the examination leading to becoming a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or Certified Management Accountant (CMA) and to investigate the requirements for issuance of the certificates in the state of one's choice.

In addition to the Business Foundation requirements, accounting majors must complete the following courses

COURSE CR COURSE CR
ACCT 233 Accounting Software 2 ACCT 435 Business Ethics 3
ACCT 331 Intermediate Accounting I 4 ACCT 442 Auditing 3
ACCT 332 Intermediate Accounting II 4 ACCT 443 Acct for Governmental Organizations 3
ACCT 336 Cost Accounting 3 ACCT 444 Federal Income Tax Acct I 3
ACCT 314 Information Systems Management 3 ACCT 445 Federal Income Tax Acct II 3
ACCT 439 Advanced Accounting 3 MGMT 341 Operations Management 3
Total Hours: 37

Students must complete 150 credit hours to take the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) exam.  The additional hours can be completed using CLEP exams, taking additional undergraduate courses, or completing a masters program such as the one available through Missouri State University.

An accounting concentration requires 35 credits consisting of the following courses selected from the Business Foundation and Accounting requirements: ACCT 231, 232, 331, 332, 336, 442, 439 or 443, and 444, ECON 212 Macroeconomics, and MGMT 331 Business Law I, and 446 Strategic Management.

An accounting minor consists of 20 credits that include ACCT 231, 232, 331, 332, 336, and 444.

Business Education

A Business Education major prepares a student for teaching business in public and private schools or vocational training environments.

A Business Education major prepares a student for teaching business in public and private schools or vocational training environments.

The general education requirements for a Business Education major must include a biological science course and a physical science course, and one of them must be with a lab (4 credits). Business Education majors must also elect either PSYC 235 Adolescent Psychology or PSYC 237 Lifespan Human Growth & Development to fulfill their general education requirements. 

In addition to the general education, business education majors must complete 34 credit hours of professional education courses required by the Education Department and 47 credit hours of business related courses as shown below.

Professional   Education Requirements
COURSE CR COURSE CR
EDUC 219 Foundations of Education 3 EDUC 417 Educational Psychology 2
EDUC 220 Practicum in Foundation 1 EDUC 427 Sem in Student Teaching 1
EDUC 222 Curric/Instruct in sec. school 2 EDUC 434 Tests and Measurements 3
EDUC 235 Educational Technology 2 EDUC 437 Student Teaching 12
EDUC 271 Exceptional Student 2 EDUC 476 Tech/Strat in Class Mgmt 2
EDUC 352 Teaching Reading in Content 2 EDUC 497 Practicum/Spec Methods 1
EDUC 397 Mid-level Practicum 1    
TOTAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION HOURS: 34
Business Requirements
ACCT 231 Financial Accounting 3 BUED 401 Implement Vocational Bus Ed       3
ACCT 232 Managerial Accounting 3 ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ACCT 239 Spreadsheet Applications 2 ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics 3
BUED 111 Keyboarding (or proficiency) 1 MGMT 235 Org Design & Management 3
BUED 112 Word Processing (or proficiency) 2 MGMT 331 Business Law I 3
BUED 275 Business Communications 3 FIN 363 Principles of Finance 3
MGMT 314 Information Systems Management 3 MRKT 239 Principles of Marketing 3
COMD 355 Web Design I 3 MRKT 347 International Business 3
BUED 337 Methods 2 BUSN 496 Senior Seminar

1

TOTAL BUSINESS HOURS: 47
TOTAL HOURS FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION MAJOR: 81

The BUED 111 and BUED 112 requirement may be met by taking a department approved proficiency exam that includes demonstration of proficiency in “touch” typing. 

In addition to meeting the academic requirements, Business Education majors must document completion of one (1) year or two thousand (2,000) hours of approved occupational experience or appropriate internship. The approval is determined by the nature of employment in a business occupation.

A Business Education major must maintain a cumulative average GPA of 2.7 and a 2.5 GPA in his or her teaching field. In addition, passing scores must be earned on all sections of the C-BASE test.

To receive a Middle School Certification, Business Education majors need to add BUED 353, 354 and EDUC 223.

Students who transfer advanced-level skill courses from other colleges or universities may be required to take proficiency tests.

Finance

A Finance major prepares the student for professional service in areas of financial services and managerial finance. The financial services path concerns the design and delivery of advice and financial products to individuals, businesses, and governments. Examples of financial services include banking, personal financial planning, real estate, insurance, and consulting. The managerial financial path concerns the duties of the financial manager who actively manages the financial affairs of any type of business. It is best that a student desiring to major or minor in finance make the decision before the junior year.

In addition to Business Foundation requirements, Finance majors will complete the following courses.

COURSE CR COURSE CR
MGMT 314 Information Systems Management 3 FIN 463 Advanced Finance 3
FIN 351 Real Estate 3 FIN 458 Strategic Investing  3
FN 442 General Insurance 3 Electives from the following  7
FIN 452 International Finance 3 - BUSN 498 Finance Internship (3)  
FIN 457 Investments 3 - ACCT 444 Fed Income Tax I (3)  
FIN 299/499 Investment Group (cumulative) 2 - MGMT 341 Operations Management (3)  
  3 - MRKT 332 Consumer Behavior (3)  
Total Hours: 30

A Finance minor requires 18 hours including ACCT 231, ECON 212, FIN 363, 452, 457 and 3 credits of electives form FIN 351, 442, 458 or 463.

Human Resource Management

A Human Resource Management minor prepares the student for positions in the areas of procurement, development, and retention of human resources. Management majors can use the minor to fulfill the elective requirements of the major. Psychology majors may elect the minor to pursue a vocational interest or graduate degree in Organizational Psychology. A Human Resource Management minor requires the following courses:

COURSE CR COURSE CR
MGMT 235 Organizational Design & Management 3 Electives from following: 6
MGMT 343 Human Resources Mgmt 3 - MGMT 498 HR Internship (3)  
MGMT 349 Human Behavior in Orgs 3 - MGMT 440 Org Leadership (3)  
MGMT 434 Workforce Selection & Dev. 3 - LEAD 250 Personal Leadership (3)  
  3 - LEAD 350 Community Leadership (3)  
Total Hours: 18

International Business

Students interested in pursuing business careers involving international trade and relations are encouraged to consider an International Business minor. Many of the  courses are cross-listed and described in other sections of the Business program or as part of Intercultural Studies (ICST) and Social Science (GOVT, ANTH). Courses required for this minor are shown below:

COURSECRCOURSECR

ICST 310 Intercultural Communication

3  GOVT 349 International Law 3
ECON 212 Macroeconomics 3 Elective: Any anthropology course 3
MRKT 347 International Business 3 Foreign Language or proficiency1 3
BUSN 494 International Business Experience2 1 FIN 452 International Finance 3
Total Hours: 22

 1Credits not required if proficiency approved by the department which may include successful completion of high school language courses, commercial language programs, or extensive exposure to foreign language environment, etc.

2Experience must be associated with international travel experience (Global Connections, study abroad, internship, etc.)

Leadership

Evangel University offers unique programs to help students develop and use their leadership abilities. The Leadership Fellows program requires 8 credit hours of leadership courses and 100 hours of community service.  Special recognition is provided at graduation. The Leadership Minor requires 18 credit hours and can be combined with any major. To learn more about the Leadership programs, see Leadership and Service under the Social Science Department.

Management

A Management major provides an excellent foundation for a career in a variety of management fields and for graduate study. Management focuses on developing systems and skills for planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and evaluating organizational performance.  This program emphasizes knowledge that contributes to analytical capacity, judgment, breadth, and flexibility of mind; the ability to accept responsibility and to make decisions; skills in interpersonal relations, communication, information management, and project management; and the ability to cope with technological innovations, social problems, economic barriers, and rapidly changing political and international situations. Students are involved with case studies for problem solving and with guest lectures and on-site visits to businesses that bring practicality and experience into the classroom.

In addition to Business Foundation requirements, Management majors complete the following courses:

COURSECR
MGMT 314 Information Systems Management 3
MGMT 341 Operations Management 3
MGMT 343 Human Resource Management 3
MGMT 349 Human Behavior in Organizations 3
MGMT 434 Workforce Selection and Development 3
Electives from following:
  • MGMT 435 Business Ethics (3)
  • MGMT 440 Organizational Leadership (3)
  • MGMT 498 Management Internship (3)
3

Electives from ACCT, ECON, FIN, MGMT, MRKT, LEAD, COMM,
CPSC, RESM or other department approved courses

12
Total Hours: 30

A Management concentration requires 36 credits consisting of the following courses selected from the Business Foundation and Management requirements:  ACCT 231 and 232, ECON 212, FIN 363, MGMT 235, 331, 341, 343, 349, and 446, MRKT 239 and three department approved business credits.

A Management minor consists of 21 credits of ACCT 231; ECON 212; MGMT 235, 331, and 349; MRKT 239, and 3 credits of electives form MGMT 341, 343, or 434.

Marketing

The Marketing major is designed to meet current and future needs of organizations and marketing agencies by developing superior entry-level marketing professionals. Graduates of this program are equipped with a rigorous set of managerial, financial, research, and marketing abilities appropriate for today's technological environment.  Options available for these majors include careers in advertising, sales, public relations, marketing research, product development, marketing management, and retail management.

This program emphasizes the most important line functions of a firm--the major link between the company and the all-important customer. Marketing majors acquire a strong set of general management knowledge and capabilities, problem-solving and decision-making abilities, interpersonal and communication skills, and a foundation in quantitative methods.

In addition to the Business Foundation requirements, Marketing majors complete the following courses:

COURSECR
MRKT 332 Consumer Behavior 3
MRKT 341 Promotions Management 3
MRKT 389 Digital Marketing 3
MRKT 446 Marketing Management 3
MRKT 441 Marketing Research 3
Electives from MRKT, MGMT, LEAD, CPSC, ART or other department approved courses 6
Electives from the following list:
  • BUSN 498 Marketing Internship (3)
  • MRKT 333 Advertising (3)
  • MRKT 345 Desktop Publishing (3)
  • MRKT 331 Entrepreneurship (3)
  • MRKT 342 Sales Management (3)
  • MRKT 352 Public Relations (3)
  • Other department approved courses
9
Total Hours: 30

A Marketing concentration requires 36 credits consisting of the following courses selected from the Business Foundation and Marketing requirements: ACCT 231, ECON 212, MGMT 331, MGMT 446, MRKT 239, 332, 341, 342, 347, either 441 or 446, and six credit hours of MRKT electives.

A Marketing minor consists of 21 credit hours from marketing and must include ECON 212, MRKT 239, 332, 341, 347 and six credits from any MRKT prefix courses.

Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise

A Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise major is designed for students who have a head for business and a heart for service. The program merges business foundation and core management courses with courses that recognized the distinctive nature of non-profit organizations. Students completing this program will be able to apply business concepts and principles to improve the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations and social enterprise initiatives.

The major will provide students with the concepts and skills to: (1) establish effective management and governance systems and structures; (2) develop financial resources and grants; (3) engage volunteers and board members; and (4) develop and market social enterprise businesses. The program provides the opportunity for students to utilize instructors with expertise in nonprofit areas of management and promotion and social enterprise development. The churches, para-church ministries, global and regional humanitarian organizations, missions organizations, health care providers, social service, and advocacy groups.

In addition to the Business Foundation requirements, Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise majors will complete the following courses:

COURSECR
NBUS 238 Philanthropy: Theory/Practice 3
NBUS 233 Nonprofit Financial Management 1
MGMT 349 Human Behavior in Organizations 3
NBUS 333 Nonprofit Governance/Law 3
MGMT 498 Internship (Nonprofit) 3
In addition to above, select the management emphasis or promotion/social enterprise emphasis courses.
Management Emphasis:
  • MGMT 343 Human Resource Mgmt (3)
  • NBUS 353 Volunteer Resource Mgmt (3)
  • MGMT 440 Organizational Leadership (3)
  • Electives (MGMT, ICST, SWK, ANTH) (9)
18
Promotion/Social Emphasis:
  • NBUS 311 Nonprofit Mrkt & Promotion (3)
  • NBUS 323 Introduction to Social Enterprise (3)
  • MRKT 352/452 Public Relations I or II (3)
  • Electives (MRKT, ICST, SWK, ANTH, COMM+) (9)
18
Total Hours: 31

Students may also meet the additional 18 elective credits by completing a minor in social work, criminal justice, intercultural studies, international studies, Biblical studies, broadcasting, digital arts, electronic media, film, journalism, photography, TESOL/TEFL, leadership, music business/technology, recreation, or other areas with the objective of enabling a student to combine their interest in managing or promoting a non-profit organization with emphasis on a particular vocational area.

The Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise concentration requires 36 credits consisting of the following courses selected from the Business Foundation and Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise requirements:  ACCT 231; ECON 212; FIN 363; MGMT 235, 331, and 446; and MRKT 239.  An additional 6 credits must be chosen from NBUS 323, 311, or 353 and an additional 3 credits from MGMT 343, 349, or MRKT 352 or 452.  Students wishing to have a promotion social/enterprise emphasis are encouraged to select NBUS 323, NBUS 311, and MRKT 352/452.

The Nonprofit Business & Social Enterprise minor will help students whose major interest is outside the business to function more effectively in the nonprofit organizations where their vocational interests may lead. The minor requires 19 credits including ECON 212, MGMT 235, MRKT 239, NBUS 233, 333, 238, and 3 hours of electives from NBUS 353, 311, or 323.

Department of Business Courses

Courses are listed alphabetically by prefix based on the following index:

  • ACCT refers to Accounting courses
  • BUED refers to Business Education courses
  • BUSN refers to general business courses
  • ECON refers to Economics courses
  • FIN refers to Finance courses
  • MGMT refers to Management courses
  • MRKT refers to Marketing courses
  • NBUS refers to Nonprofit Business and Social Enterprise courses

Some are listed under two categories or may also be listed in another department under another prefix. These cross-listed courses are combined for instruction.

Accounting Courses (ACCT)

231. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

An introduction to the basic principles of accounting. Covers the analysis and recording of business transactions, controlling accounts, journalizing, posting, adjusting entries, closing entries, statement preparation, partnerships and corporations, and accounting for taxes, costs, and branches.

232. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

A continuation of ACCT 231 with an emphasis on the use of accounting data for purposes of decision-making, particularly as it relates to budgeting, forecasting, strategies, planning, and capital expenditures in the business environment. Prerequisite: ACCT 231.

233. ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS (2)

Extensive applications of QuickBooks software for small business accounting include the creation of a chart of accounts, recording customer and vendor transactions, processing payroll, and printing reports. Advanced topics apply budgeting concepts, utilization of the QuickBooks audit trail, and the exporting to Excel software. Prerequisite: ACCT 231.

239. SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS (3)

Emphasizes the use of the micro-computer with Excel spreadsheet and Access data base software to solve various problems presented in accounting courses. Prerequisite: ACCT 231. Recommended to be taken concurrently with ACCT 232.

314. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

This course examines the development and use of management and computer information systems supporting the vision and operation of organizations. An emphasis is placed on general knowledge of various information systems, with specific focus on information knowledge management, system development and evaluation, emerging trends, organizational communication, and the ethical use of information systems.

331. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (4)

An extensive coverage of cash, receivables, installment sales, consignments, inventories, plant and equipment, intangibles, investments, annuities, bonds, liabilities, fund and reserves, stockholders' equity, and profit and loss analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 232.

332. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (4)

A continuation of ACCT 331 with articulation of the income statement, the balance sheet, and the cash flow statement. Prerequisite: ACCT 331.

336. COST ACCOUNTING (3)

An introduction to cost accounting, emphasizing accounting for materials, labor costs, manufacturing expenses, job order and process cost systems, and the use of cost information in assisting management in planning and controlling. Prerequisite: ACCT 232.

339. FORENSIC ACCOUNTING (3)

This introductory course in Forensic Accounting is designed to provide students with knowledge regarding a serious challenge facing businesses today - fraud. The course will review both fraud perpetrated against an organization through the misappropriation of assets, as well as management fraud in which top management perpetrates the fraud, usually by misrepresentations made on the financial statements.

394. FREE ENTERPRISE II (0.5)

An interactive development and application of small business operations models. Includes the analysis and practice of financial, management, and marketing principles through business partnerships.

435. BUSINESS ETHICS (3)

Course examines ethical concepts as applied in the business environment. The framework is an exploration of the historical and philosophical basis for values in American business and in multinational contexts. This course is designed to meet the ethics requirements for professional certifications inclusive of core values for the CPA profession (integrity, objectivity, and independence). Emphasis on professional conduct and enforcement actions.

439. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3)

An advanced study of accounting principles and their application to special topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 332.

442. AUDITING (3)

A study of auditing theory, practice, and procedure as applied by independent accountants and internal auditors, the development of audit programs, and the ethics of the profession. Prerequisite: ACCT 332.

443. ACCOUNTING FOR GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS (3)

Examines governmental and not-for-profit organizational accounting records and funds, including budget control, analysis, and interpretation of financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 332.

444. FEDERAL INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING I (3)

A study of federal tax laws and accounting principles involved, with special emphasis upon income taxes for individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: ACCT 232.

445. FEDERAL INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING II (3)

Covers principles of federal tax accounting, income tax problems of partnerships and corporations, estate and gift tax problems of individuals. Prerequisite: ACCT 444. Offered on demand.

448. CPA PROBLEMS (3)

A study of difficult accounting, auditing, and business law problems. This advanced course is provided for the outstanding student who anticipates a career in accounting. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Offered on demand.

460-470. CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN ACCOUNTING (3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-2)

Offered on demand.

Business Education Courses (BUED)

111. ELEMENTARY KEYBOARDING (1)

For beginning students only. Covers keyboard mastery, technique, speed, and accuracy development, and elementary typewriting problems. Three class hours per week.

112. WORD PROCESSING (2)

A study of word processing concepts, the relationship between word processing and total informational processing, and the relationship between word processing and business productivity. Three hours of lab required per week. Prerequisite: BUED 111.

275. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3)

A study of objectives, methods, and forms of communication in business. A review of written and non-written forms of communication, including effective use of the English language. Prerequisite: RHET 205 or equivalent Composition course, and at least one Business course.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN BUSINESS (1)

Examines the organization, objectives, content, equipment, methods of demonstration, and techniques necessary for skill building. Covers lesson planning for courses in typewriting, bookkeeping, basic business, and related courses on the high school level. Designed primarily for the beginning high school teacher. Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 497. Prerequisites: ACCT 232 and BUED 112.

353. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE SCHOOL (2)

Acquaints prospective or experienced teachers and administrators with the functions, organization, curriculum, and personnel associated with the middle school and junior high school, along with concentration on the early adolescent/transient learner. Also includes an introduction to innovative instructional methods, a unit on use of instructional technology, and a unit on evaluative procedures.

354. PRACTICUM IN MIDDLE SCHOOL SUBJECT AREA (1)

Observation and participation in the middle school (grades 5-9) with both non-instructional and limited instructional responsibilities. Provides a sequence of experiences in a variety of basic business teaching methods and skills such as questioning techniques, reinforcement, stimulus variation, use of illustrations and examples, demonstrations, and disciplinary procedures.

401. IMPLEMENTING (VOCATIONAL) BUSINESS EDUCATION PROGRAMS (3)

In-depth investigation of curriculum development and implementation of vocational business education classes on the high school and middle school level. Includes research of issues and procedures for career and technical education in the public and private sectors leading to knowledge of core competencies for marketing education programs.

460-470. CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (3)

Offered on demand.

496. SEMINAR IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (1)

A special problems course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

299/499. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-2)

A special problems course. Offered on demand.

General Business Courses (BUSN)

100. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR (1)

This introductory course helps new Evangel students acclimatize themselves to the University. As such, it serves as an intellectual and practical orientation to the challenges and opportunities of University life and learning. Students are introduced to Evangelís Christ-centered, integrational, exploratory, and global ethos. They learn to use and participate in campus-wide and department-specific offerings. They build relationships within departmental contexts as well as across campus. They are encouraged to understand that they are being prepared not only for a career but for life.

494. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EXPERIENCE (1)

A course designed to have students demonstrate that they have interacted with a foreign business culture and can articulate how business practices and leadership approaches are impacted by cultural, governmental, and historical awareness.

496. SENIOR SEMINAR (1)

Prepares students for job search and interviews. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

498. BUSINESS INTERNSHIP (3)

Internship experience in an organization, emphasizing skills in the student's major area of study. Prerequisites: 12 hours of business courses or Junior/Senior status and permission of Department Chair. Offered on demand.

Economics Courses (ECON)

212. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)

Introduction to economic problems of finance, labor, employment, international trade, social problems, price and wage structure, prosperity and depressions, inflation and deflation, and the role of government in the economic field.

213. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)

Continuation of the basic principles of economics with particular emphasis on the nature of household, firm, or industry decision-making applications. Prerequisite: ECON 212.

Finance Courses (FIN)

138. PERSONAL FINANCE (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student an overview of the role stewardship plays in one's daily life. There is a strong emphasis placed on Biblical purposes of money, attitudes towards financial wealth, and accountability for personal resource choices.

351. PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE (3)

Examines the characteristics of real estate as they affect the market. Considers the procedures and problems in financing real estate and the techniques of valuation.

363. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (3)

Basic principles and theories of business finance, including tax environment, cash flow analysis, working capital management, effects of financial and operational leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital analysis, investment banking, mergers, acquisitions, reorganizations, and liquidations. Prerequisites: MGMT/MATH 210 and ACCT 231.

442. GENERAL INSURANCE (3)

General principles of insurance and their applications to business enterprises, including life insurance, casualty insurance, fire insurance, Social Security, and workmen's compensation.

452. INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3)

Survey of the key concepts of business finance in the context of a multi-national firm.

457. INVESTMENTS (3)

Study of investment principles, investment media, security markets, and the importance of analyzing industries and their macroenvironments.

458. STRATEGIC INVESTING (3)

A course designed to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of investments and learn effective strategies for utilizing fixed income instruments in business and personal finance. Course includes debt and equity principles, interest rates and yield curve dynamics, bond types and valuation, mortgage backed securities, asset allocation optimization, sector and country rotation, value investing, Dow theory, options, and financial planning. Prerequisite: FIN 363 Principles of Finance and FIN 457 Investments (may be concurrent).

463. ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

Emphasizes the analytical skills involved in financial decision making. Prerequisite: FIN 363.

460/470. CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS (3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. DIRECTED RESEARCH (0.5 - 3)

Offered on demand.

Management Courses (MGMT)

235. ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT (3)

Introduction to management. Contingency view of management theory and practice. Emphasizes skills used by managers to get the job done: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. Integrates the functions of management with appropriate quantitative and behavioral concepts.

314. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

This course examines the development and use of management and computer information systems supporting the vision and operation of organizations. Am emphasis is placed on general knowledge of various information systems, with specific focus on information knowledge management, system development and evaluation, emerging trends, organizational communication, and the ethical use of information systems.

331. BUSINESS LAW I (3)

Principles of law applicable to business and to the individual. Covers legal background, contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, suretyship, sale of personal property, real property, bailment, partnerships, corporations, deeds, mortgages, torts, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

332. BUSINESS LAW II (3)

Continuation of Business Law I, emphasizing commercial applications. Uses case material and problems.

341. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

Quantitative techniques, using mathematical models that assist in the decision-making function of management. Topics include probability and statistical decision; linear programming such as inventory control, PERT, and the critical path method; the matrix theory and the game theory; and Markov Processes and the queuing theory. Prerequisite: MGMT 235.

343. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Principles and practices currently used by business in the management of personnel. Includes labor sources, selection and placement of personnel, workers' environment, compensation, training, promotion, health and safety, benefit plans, and relations between management and employees. Prerequisite: Junior status or MGMT 349.

349. HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS (3)

Basic causes of individual and group problems in industry. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

434. WORKFORCE SELECTION & DEVELOPMENT (3)

A course designed to develop knowledge and techniques in selecting employees and developing effective orientation and training programs. Prerequisite: MGMT 343 & MGMT 349 or permission of professor.

435. BUSINESS ETHICS (3)

Ethical problems in business. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Offered on demand.

440. ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP (3)

A course designed to provide the student with a broad survey of theory and research on leadership in formal organizations, with a focus on leadership effectiveness. The course is appropriate for many disciplines other than business. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

446. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

Advanced case-study of top-management problems and determining influences in business policymaking. Deals with the executive in high decision making. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

460/470. CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN MANAGEMENT (3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. DIRECTED RESEARCH (1-2)

Offered on demand.

Marketing Courses (MRKT)

194. FREE ENTERPRISE (0.5)

Interactive introduction to economic, marketing, and budgeting principles for operating a business in a free-market economy.

239. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3)

Basic principles of marketing, including structure and functions with emphasis on the managerial viewpoint.

294. FREE ENTERPRISE I (0.5)

Interactive introduction to economic, marketing, and budgeting principles for operating a business in a free-market economy.

332. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3)

The influence of cultural, social, and psychological factors on consumer behavior. Prerequisite: MRKT 239.

333. ADVERTISING (3)

Introduction to the basic techniques of advertising.

341. PROMOTIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

Examines the management of the promotional mix of the company. Includes a study of the marketing subsystem used to inform and persuade both present and potential customers. Prerequisite: MRKT 239.

342. SALES MANAGEMENT (3)

Managerial aspects of selling operations with particular reference to problems involved in investigations of markets, planning the sales effort, management of sales and service personnel, and control of sales operation. Prerequisite: MRKT 239. Offered on demand.

345. DESKTOP PUBLISHING DESIGN (3)

The design and lay out of publications on the computer. Includes basic design principles, typography, and relevant computer software.

347. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)

Marketing, management, and finance in an international environment. Emphasis on the cultural and environmental differences in various foreign markets and how those differences affect an international marketing program. Prerequisite: MRKT 239.

352. PUBLIC RELATIONS (3)

The relationship between publicity and public relations, with emphasis on the steps and means, the policies, and the people through which good public relations can be achieved. Prerequisite: COMM 214 or permission of professor.

355. MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION I: WEB DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN (3)

Introduction to the development of computer media on the World Wide Web using text, visuals, animation audio, and video. Topics of study include HTML, JavaScript, Web page design, and production of multimedia elements for web sites. Builds on the student's previous knowledge of desktop publishing, audio and video production, and computer applications.

389. DIGITAL MARKETING (3)

This class will be a blend of theory and practice, creative thinking exercises, guest speakers with expertise in digital marketing, and hands-on application to explore new and emerging marketing strategies and concepts of today's digital marketing landscape. The course also explores marketing effects on individuals, audiences, publics and cultures. Interactive marketing theories, database and search engine marketing, innovative digital media product development, branding, distribution and social influence strategies will be explored. Prerequisite: MRKT 239 Principles of Marketing or permission of the instructor.

433. ADVERTISING II (3)

In-depth approach to advertising theory, strategy, and execution. Includes practical experience in gathering marketing data, writing a marketing plan, creating a copy platform, and expediting an advertising job from conception through final client approval. Prerequisites: COMM 214 and MRKT 333. Recommended: COMM 246 and COMM 345.

441. MARKETING RESEARCH (3)

The systematic search for and study of facts relevant to problem solving in marketing management. Prerequisites: One course in statistics, 6 hours of marketing courses, or permission of professor.

446. MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

Advanced case-study course giving attention to planning, decision making, and evaluating the total marketing program of various organizations. Prerequisites: MRKT 441, or permission of professor.

452. ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS (3)

Designed to give experience in and knowledge of the techniques and tools of the public relations practitioner. Prerequisite: MRKT 352.

460-470. CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN MARKETING (2)

Offered on demand.

299/499. DIRECTED RESEARCH IN MARKETING (1-3)

Prerequisite MRKT 239 and Permission of Professor

MRKT 299:  prerequistites - MRKT 239 and permission of professor
MRKT 499:  prerequisites - Senior Status and/or permission of professor

Nonprofit Business and Social Enterprise Courses (NBUS)

233. NONPROFIT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (1)

Course provides an overview of fund accounting concepts, budgeting, and an understanding of the unique financial management issues and decisions that confront management in the nonprofit sector. The course enables learners to understand how non-profit managers should integrate financial strategy and decisions within a broader framework of their mission. This course is appropriate for students from any major who intend to be involved in the management of any non-profit organization or activity. Prerequisite: ACCT 232 for business majors or permission of the instructor and completion of Statistics and Personal Finance for non-business majors.

238. PHILANTHROPY: THEORY & PRACTICE (3)

Course covers emerging trends in philanthropy and enables learners to develop and execute plans to solicit financial resources for nonprofit organizations, including processes to discern which fund raising elements are appropriate for a specific organization; the roles of a board, development staff, executive staff and program staff; and processes to identify and engage sources of funding through public and private campaigns and grant writing. Prerequisite: None

311. NON PROFIT MARKETING & PROMOTION (3)

Course applies trends, principles, and practices of marketing and promotion to nonprofit organizations, including the growth and development on nonprofit marketing, the language of nonprofits, application of branding concepts and multicultural communications for nonprofits, and use of social media. Also includes student design of an integrated marketing plan for a nonprofit organization. Prerequisite: MRKT 239.

323. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL ENTERPRISE (3)

Course examines the concepts and purpose of for-profit and non-profit social enterprise organizations and how to develop a business idea, promote the idea, develop an operations system for the product or service; examine regulatory requirements that must be met, identify the type of organization that best fits the purpose of the social enterprise, and create a plan for sustainability. Prerequisite: MRKT 239 Principles of Marketing or permission of the instructor.

333. NONPROFIT GOVERNANCE & LAW (3)

Course examines the governance structure and the internal and external relationships of nonprofit organizations from the perspective of the legal and operational environment. Prerequisite: MGMT 331 Business Law I for business majors and junior status for non-business majors.

353. VOLUNTEER ENGAGEMENT & RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Course covers the effective practices for recruiting, sustaining, and managing volunteers as a key resource of the nonprofit organization. Prerequisite: None.