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Department of Humanities

The Department of Humanities offers programs of study in Art, English, French, Humanities, Spanish, TESOL, TEFL, and Theatre. Through its General Education offerings, the department offers both the joy and the challenge of education to all students. In addition, the Department prepares majors in all its disciplines to take their places in the professional world, in teaching, or in business and industry, where Humanities majors are recognized as valuable employees.

Grades lower than C- for courses in the major or concentration for Art, English, French, Spanish, and Theatre do not count toward the credit totals in these programs.

Art

Art courses in the appreciation and history of art familiarize students with the development of art and its relationship to world culture. Courses in theory and applied art help to fulfill the requirements for teaching art in the public schools and to develop proficiency as an artist in a student's chosen field.

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree consists of 12 credits of art history (ART 102, 103, 330, and 334 or 493) and 58 credits of studio art. (Note: credits for one additional art history course may be substituted for an art studio elective.) Of the 58 studio art credits, all candidates for the B.F.A. degree must take the Foundation courses ART 106, 110, 111, 206, and the Core courses Art 208, 210, 212, 214 or 219, 440, and 470. Graphic design students must also take 430. Of the 58 credits of studio art, the B.F.A. candidate must have a minimum of 12 credits in a concentrated area.  Note: this degree program does require 6 credits of foreign-language study.

Application to the Humanities Department for admission into the B.F.A. program must be submitted upon completion of the Foundation courses (ART 106, 110, 111, and 206) and a minimum of two Core courses either completed or in progress with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses. This application must be submitted by February of the applicant's sophomore year. Failure to meet this deadline may result in a denial of acceptance into the program. A review of the candidate's application for candidacy in the B.F.A. program will be scheduled during the month of March by a committee of art faculty. The applicant should bring examples of work completed during the freshman and sophomore year. The decision of the committee is based on the student's GPA in required courses, an evaluation of the student's work, the student's apparent commitment to art, the student's goals in art, and the results of a personal interview with the committee. At the end of the interview, if the committee suggests that the student not pursue the B.F.A. degree based on strength of work, commitment to art, or professional goals, the student may pursue one of two alternatives. The student may 1) re-apply for the B.F.A. review at the next scheduled date or 2) pursue any of the other degree programs offered in the art area.

Based upon number of hours and courses transferred, a transfer student will be advised as to the appropriate date to submit an application for candidacy into the B.F.A. program.

The Bachelor of Arts degree consists of 12 credits of art history (ART 102, 103, 330, and 334 or 493) and 33 credits in art. All candidates for the B.A. degree must take the Foundation courses (ART 106, 110, 111, and 206). Six credits are also required from the following courses: ART 208, 210, 214, or 219. All art majors must complete the Foundation and Core requirements during their freshman and sophomore years. In addition, all B.A. candidates in art must take ART 440 and 470. The remaining 12 elective credits may be taken from studio art courses or an additional art history course. A minor of 18-23 credits is required with this degree.  Note: this degree program does require 6 credits of foreign-language study.

The Bachelor of Arts in Art Education consists of 9 credits of art history (ART 102, 103, and 330), 27 credits of studio art (ART 106, 110, 111, 206, 208, 210, 212, 213, and 214 or 219), and 4 credits of methods (Art 336 and 341) for a total of 40 credits. These courses meet the Missouri State requirements for certification in Art Education (grades K-12). Senior Seminar and Senior Art Exhibit (Art 440 and 470) are optional but do not count toward the 40-credit requirement for Art Education. A minor of 18-23 credits is required with this degree. See the Department of Education section for other requirements.  Note: this degree program does require 6 credits of foreign-language study.

Candidates for the B.F.A., B.A., or B.A. in Art Education must receive a minimum grade of C- in any art course for that course to count toward the degree.

An Art concentration consists of 12 credits in Foundations (ART 106, 110, 111, and 206), 9 credits in art history, and 9 credits of art electives for a total of 30 art credits. If a student with a concentration in art desires to show his or her work in a senior show [participation is subject to departmental faculty review], the student must take ART 440-Senior Seminar (2 credits) and ART 470-Senior Art Exhibit (1 credit), neither of which may count toward the 30-hour total for the concentration. 

An Art minor consists of 9 credits in Foundations (ART 106, 110, and 111), 6 credits in art history, and 9 credits of art electives (6 of which must be studio) for a total of 24 art credits.

A Photography minor with an Art emphasis consists of 21 credits, including ART 110, COEM 175, ARTP 215, 315, 319, 370, and a choice of 6 credits from the following: ARTP 415, ARTP 419, ARTP 450, ARTP 498, and COMF 473. A Photography minor with a Communications emphasis is offered through the Communications Department.

Art Courses (ART)

100. ART APPRECIATION (2-3)

Open to non-Art majors only. Meets the General Education requirement. Familiarizes the non-art major with the cultural traditions and the contributions of art to present-day living. May not be used to fulfill credit requirements for the Art major, minor, or concentration.

102. ART HISTORY I (3)

A survey of the history of Western art from Prehistoric times to the Renaissance.

103. ART HISTORY II (3)

A survey of the history of Western art from the Renaissance to Modernism. Prerequisite for Art majors: Art 102.

106. DRAWING I (3)

An introduction to drawing media and processes. This course is a prerequisite to other two-dimensional art courses, and, with the Fundamentals of Two-Dimensional Design, forms the foundation for later courses in two-dimensional art. Open to non-Art majors. Special fees.

110. FUNDAMENTALS OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3)

Visual design concepts, including artistic vocabulary, aesthetic theory, and use of design elements and principles in various media and materials. Along with Drawing I, forms the foundation for later courses in two-and three-dimensional art. Open to non-Art majors. Required fee.

111. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3)

A study of the elements and principles of three-dimensional design. Students gain experience with a variety of media and subject matter. This course forms the foundation for later courses in three-dimensional art and must be taken before Sculpture I (ART 210). Prerequisite: ART 110. Special fees.

206. DRAWING II (3)

A continuation of drawing fundamentals in greater depth and an exploration of additional media. Introduces drawing the figure from gesture to finished work. Prerequisites: ART 106 and 110. Special fees.

208. PRINTMAKING I (3)

An introduction to basic techniques and concepts of etching, engraving, and aquatint. Prerequisites: ART 106 and 110. Special fees.

210. SCULPTURE I (3)

An introduction to basic techniques and concepts of sculpture as artistic expression. Explores uses of plaster and clay as media. Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of professor. Special fees.

212. CERAMICS I (3)

Introduction to clay and glaze techniques designed to introduce wheel-throwing in the following semesters. Emphasizes hand-building techniques and the aesthetics of ceramic design. Required fee.

213. FIBERS I: WEAVING (3)

Instruction in the basic fundamentals of off-loom and loom weaving, using a wide variety of weaving techniques and weaves. Prerequisites: ART 110 or permission. Special fees.

214. PAINTING I (3)

An introduction to oil painting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of form and color relationships in painting. Prerequisites: ART 106 and 110 or permission of professor. Special fees.

216. GRAPHIC DESIGN I (3)

An introduction to design principles as they relate to the graphic design field. Computer emphasis in Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Prerequisite: ART 110. Special fees.

219. WATERCOLOR (3)

An introductory course in watercolors involving drawing, composition, application of color theory, and the use of various watercolor papers, brushes, and masking techniques. Recommended for graphic design students. Those continuing in painting should enroll in ART 214 Painting I (oil). Prerequisites: Art 106 and 110. Special fees.

306. DRAWING III (3)

A study of problems of greater visual and conceptual complexity with more emphasis on the development of individual stylistic qualities. Prerequisite: ART 206. Special fees.

308. PRINTMAKING II (3)

Advanced problems in printmaking with emphasis on the development of individual style. Prerequisite: ART 208. Required fee.

310. SCULPTURE II (3)

Emphasis on independent creativity and new approaches covering a wide range of media and methods with a concentration on the formation of ideas and their interpretations. Prerequisite: ART 210. Special fees.

312. CERAMICS II (3)

Emphasizes the development of beginning throwing skills and basic glaze formation. Also studies ceramic design development. Prerequisite: ART 212. Special fees.

313. FIBERS II (3)

Advanced techniques and problems that relate to papermaking, weaving, batik, and tie-dye. Prerequisite: ART 110 or 213. Special fees.

314. PAINTING II (3)

A continuation of the fundamentals of form and color relationships in oil painting leading to a broader application in a range of genres from self-portraits and working from a model to more conceptually-based painting. Prerequisite: ART 214. Special fees.

316. GRAPHIC DESIGN II (3)

Emphasis and problems directed towards grids and grid systems. Language and communication skills integrating the use of type and image are emphasized, and the course continues instruction of Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Prerequisite: ART 216 or permission of instructor. Special fees.

330. ART HISTORY III: HISTORY OF MODERN ART (3)

A survey of modern art from Impressionism to current trends. Prerequisites for Art majors: Art 102 and 103.

334. ART HISTORY IV: SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (3)

Special topics include examination of traditional and new interpretations of art history, art criticism, modernism, post-modernism, cultural worldviews, and the Christian worldview in art history; also examination of non-Western art. Prerequisites: ART 102, 103, and 330.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR ART K-12 (3)

For Art Education Majors. Methods in teaching at the elementary and secondary level with an emphasis on projects, rationale, and evaluation techniques. Should be taken concurrently with EDUC 497.

410. SCULPTURE III (3)

A study of the advanced individual development of style and aesthetics as they relate to the field of sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 310.

411. SCULPTURE IV (3)

Independent creativity with a wide range of media and methods. Emphasis on the formation of ideas and their interpretations. Prerequisite: ART 410.

412. CERAMICS III (3)

A study of advanced clay forming and glaze formulation, including sculptural forms in clay and dinnerware production. Further study on ceramic design and personal aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 312. Special fees.

413. CERAMICS IV (3)

Experimental ceramics with advanced individual development of style and aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 412. Required fee.

414. PAINTING III (3)

Concentrates on developing imaginative resources in painting. Emphasizes the student's individual stylistic strengths. Prerequisite: ART 314. Special fees.

416. TYPOGRAPHY (3)

The proper application of type as it relates to the printed page, typographical texture, and corporate logos. Prerequisites: ART 110 and 216.

417. PAINTING IV (3)

A concentration on individual style and on aesthetics in painting. Prerequisite: ART 414. Special fees.

418. GRAPHIC DESIGN III (3)

A study of advanced problems in color, package design, and layout. Continued use of Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Prerequisite: ART 316. Special fees.

420. GRAPHIC DESIGN IV (3)

Examines specific problems relating to the student's primary area of interest: magazine layout, newspaper layout, corporate identity, or package design. Includes refinement of the portfolio in preparation for senior exhibition and a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: ART 418. Special fees.

430. INTERNSHIP/GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)

Prerequisite: Senior standing with a graphic design emphasis.

440. SENIOR SEMINAR: INTEGRATING ART WITH CHRISTIAN FAITH (2)

Capstone course for the Art major. Selected readings and discussions examine the integration of art and Christian faith, and the artist's role in contemporary society. The seminar includes preparation of resume, artist statement, and artwork for senior art exhibition.

250/450. STUDIO LESSONS (1-3)

Studio criticism. Three hours spent in the studio each week per credit. Work may be completed in the following areas: ceramics, printmaking, drawing, painting, sculpture, graphic design, and digital imagery. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Special fees. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours on the 450 level.

460. PROBLEMS IN CREATIVE ART (1-3)

Individual projects using a choice of media with emphasis on areas of special need or concentration. Prerequisite: Permission of professor.

470. SENIOR ART EXHIBIT (1)

Completion of artwork for exhibition. Refinement of artist statement started in senior seminar. Final preparation of artwork portfolio.

493. PROBLEMS IN ART HISTORY (1-3)

Individual projects and/or special problems in art history. Prerequisites: ART 102, 103, or permission of professor.

298/498. PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Offered on demand.

Photography Courses (ARTP)

215. INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

(Cross-listed with COPH 215) Introduces the student to basic 35 mm film and digital photography. Includes the understanding of camera technology, features, and settings. Basic composition, exposure, lighting, and color will also be covered. Students will learn elementary darkroom printing techniques. Photoshop and related software will be covered in terms of correcting for exposure, color, and composition. Fee for photographic supplies is required.

315. PORTRAIT AND STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of professional portrait photography both in studio and on location. Additional learning in glamor and fashion photographic techniques will be explored. Students will learn flash and lighting techniques used in studio work. Course also covers use of photo editing techniques and film processing and printing used in this genre.

319. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (0)

(Cross-listed with COPH 319.) Continuation of modern photographic techniques using digital cameras and imaging software. Advanced techniques and features of the digital-SLR camera. Digital photos are imported into Photoshop for correction, enhancement, and effects. Various methods for processing and printing digital photos. Required fee for printing supplies. Prerequisite: ARTP 215 or COPH 215.

370. PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW WORKSHOP (1)

This workshop course offers the student photographer the knowledge and skills on a practical level to produce, prepare, and mount photos for public exhibition.

415. LARGE-FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

(Cross-listed with COPH 415.) Use of large format film cameras. Professional photographic techniques in addition to the creation of complex photographic effects. Large format printing using the darkroom. Prerequisites: ARTP 215 and 315 OR COPH 215 and 315.

419. DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

This course provides the student with the principles and techniques of artistically capturing and presenting photos acquired from real-world subject matter. This course explores creative photographic methods used in nature, documentary, and journalistic photographic situations. Students will also learn the ethics of photo editing in dealing with real subject matter used for documentary or journalism.

498. INTERNSHIP (3)

Offered on demand

English Studies

An English major may work toward graduate studies, creative writing, editorial work, teaching, or public positions requiring smooth cultural rapport and precise, efficient use of the English language.

An English major consists of 33 required credits (ENGL 123, 212, 271, 272, 298, 301, 302, 303, 331, 445, and 497) and 6 elective credits, totaling 39 English credits, 18 of which must be on the upper-division (300-400) level. ENGL 212 meets the Effective Communication requirement in the Core Curriculum.

An English concentration consists of 24 required credits (ENGL 123, 212, 271, 272, 301, 302, 303, and 331) and 3 elective credits, totaling 27 English credits, 12 of which must be on the upper-division (300-400) level. ENGL 212 meets the Effective Communication requirement in the Core Curriculum.

An English minor consists of 15 required credits (ENGL 123; 212; 271 or 272; 301, 302, or 303; and 331) and 6 elective credits (ENGL 445 recommended), totaling 21 English credits, 9 of which must be on the upper-division (300-400) level. ENGL 212 meets the Effective Communication requirement in the Core Curriculum. 

An English Education major consists of 34 required credits (ENGL 123; 212; 222; 271; 272; 298; three of the following: 301, 302, 303, and 331; plus 398, 445, and 497) and 3 elective credits from ENGL 111, 236, 341, or 436, totaling 37 English credits. ENGL 212 meets the Effective Communication requirement in the Core Curriculum. ENGL 336 is a collateral requirement for DESE certification that does not count toward the content-area (English) requirements. The Professional Education component of the degree requires at least 34 additional credit-hours of approved work under Education Department regulations.

The TESOL Minor (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) consists of 18 required credits (TESL 433, 436, 445, 439, 336, and 497) and 3 elective credits (ENGL 298, EDUC 337, or EDUC 351), for a total of 21 credits.  This minor will prepare students to teach English as a second language in the United States.  Each state has its own certification requirements, which usually involve training at the level of at least a minor.  Evangel’s program is calibrated with the requirements of Missouri’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), but it is open to students of any major from any department.

For information on teaching certification in Language Arts, grades 5-9 or 5-12, see guidelines in the Department of Education listings.

A Writing minor consists of 18 credits configured as follows:

  1. Required Courses: ENGL 298 (2-3 credits) and ENGL 498 (1-2 credits)
  2. Restricted Electives: Select one course from each group to total 9 hours: ENGL 211, 212, 236, or ENGL/COMM 205; COMM 214, COMM 322, or ENGL/COMJ 341; COMJ 435 or ENGL 436.
  3. Open Electives: Select 4-6 hours from the following options: COMM 214, COMJ 216, COMM 322, ENGL/COMM 341, COMJ 435, ENGL 211, ENGL 212, ENGL 236, ENGL/COMJ 436, ENGL 497, ENGL 493, ENGL 496, or ENGL/COMJ 498.
  4. Other requirements: Select one of the following: 1) one full year as Epiphany staff member, 2) one full year as page or copy editor for The Lance, or 3) one full year as copy editor or assistant copy editor for Excalibur. Submit a professional writing portfolio of ten polished pieces (written in five or more courses) for approval by the English and Communication faculties at the time of filing senior papers.
  5. The student is strongly advised to choose PHIL 111 (Introduction to Deductive Logic, 3 credits) for the Core Curriculum Humanities Option.

 

English Courses (ENGL)

100. INTENSIVE GRAMMAR REVIEW (1)

Fundamental components of English grammar. Emphasis on parts of speech and their proper sentence relationships in academic written English. Individualized instruction in correction and avoidance of common grammatical errors. Semester culminates with basic paragraph instruction and practice. Laboratory required. Not a composition course; does not fulfill any Humanities requirement or elective in Core Curriculum; must be followed by ENGL 102. Prerequisite (one of the following): ACT English 15 or below; SAT 380 or below.

102. BASIC ENGLISH SKILLS (2)

Basic principles of grammar, punctuation, and expression. Emphasis on writing clear, well-developed paragraphs in a variety of patterns including narrative, exemplification, and persuasion. Semester culminates with a short essay. Laboratory required. Grade of C- or better required for enrollment in ENGL 111. Prerequisite (one of the following): ACT ENG 19 or below; SAT Writing 460 or below; SAT Writing/Language 26 or below.

111. COMPOSITION (3)

Introduction to the thesis-support essay form, including informative, persuasive, documented, and literary analysis, with an emphasis on avoiding plagiarism. Includes strategies for organizing, writing, editing, revising, quoting, summarizing, paraphrasing, and documenting. Passing of both documented essay and Writing Proficiency Examination required. Prerequisite: ACT ENG 20-25; SAT Writing 470-580; or ENGL 102 with grade of C- or better.

123. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (3)

Introduction to understanding and interpreting literature. Literary selections drawn from various cultures and at least three common genres. No prerequisite.

205. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION (3)

(Cross-listed with COMM 205) This course integrates the elements of writing and speaking so that students may more readily appreciate the intersection of these two activities. Based on a communication model that recognizes the rhetorical situation as a determining factor in all communication decisions, the course provides students with instruction on gathering, organizing, researching and presenting information appropriate for the audience, context and purpose of the communication event. Students will be asked to deliver written and oral products to demonstrate their mastery of language skills. Prerequisite: ACT English > 26; SAT Writing > 590; or English Proficiency.

211. COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC (3)

Advanced instruction in the thesis-support essay form with emphasis on analysis and rhetorically appropriate response. Students learn advanced research strategies by writing at least two papers requiring considerable source support. Focus on adjusting writing styles toward audience, purpose, and specific writing situations. Prerequisite: ENGL 111 and EU Writing Proficiency or ACT English > 26 or SAT Writing > 590 or proof of EU writing proficiency otherwise according to the General Requirements for Graduation.

212. COMPOSITION AND LITERARY ANALYSIS (3)

Advanced composition and rhetoric for persons in literary-studies degree programs (primarily English, Biblical Studies, and Missions). Introduction to at least four major literary-critical theories of the twentieth century, with a substantial essay from each perspective required. Discussion of each theory's continuing potential for use in the current critical climate. Study and application of fundamental techniques for producing scholarly papers in literary analysis and interpretation. MLA and CM/Turabian styles taught; SBL accepted. Prerequisites: 1) a major, minor, or concentration in English or the Department of Bible and Theology and 2) ENGL 111 plus EU Writing Proficiency or ACT English >26 or SAT Writing >590 or SAT Writing/Language > 33 or proof of EU Writing Proficiency otherwise according to the General Education Requirements for Graduation. Prerequisites for student without ENGL 111 or an ACT English /SAT Essay score: ACT ENG 29+ (or SAT Writing Skills 630+) and proof of EU writing proficiency otherwise according to the General Requirements for Graduation.

222. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE (3)

Demonstrates how literature currently read by adolescents/young adults represents cultural, physical, and ethnological diversity as well as a variety of adolescent/young-adult concerns and value systems. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+. Note: this course does not meet the "Reading and Imagination" requirement in the Core Curriculum, but it may be used for the "Humanities" Option.

236. EXPOSITORY WRITING (3)

Focuses on the expository essay as a means of exploration and self-expression. Students read a range of essays and imitate or develop techniques suitable for blog writing, academic writing, feature writing, and other contexts that require academic or creative, non-fictional expression. Prerequisite: EU Writing Proficiency. May be used in place of ENGL 211 or ENGL/COMM 205 for the Effective Communication requirement except by Elementary Education majors.

271. AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR (3)

Study of American writing with emphasis on social and intellectual backgrounds from the Puritans through Transcendentalism. Offered fall semester. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

272. AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER THE CIVIL WAR (3)

Study of American writing with emphasis on social and intellectual backgrounds from Realism to post-World War II. Offered spring and summer semesters. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

298. ENGLISH PRACTICUM (2-3)

Prerequisite to ENGL 445 and ENGL 398. English grammar and the teaching of writing. Non-Education majors may take the course for 2 credits; Education majors must take it for 3. All students attend class 3 hours a week; Education majors serve as assistants for ENGL 102 labs. Under program necessity and with certain accommodations, non-Education majors may be asked to assist in such labs. Students must sign a waiting list at least one semester before enrollment. Prerequisites: (1)EU Writing Proficiency according to the General Requirements for Graduation; (2) permission of professor.

301. ENGLISH LITERATURE SURVEY I (3)

Survey of the Medieval and Renaissance eras in English literature to about 1670. Emphasizes major writers. Course rotation is stated on the Humanities Department English requirement form.

302. ENGLISH LITERATURE SURVEY II (3)

Survey of the Neoclassical and Romantic eras in English literature to about 1832 (first Reform Act). Emphasizes major writers. Course rotation is stated on the Humanities Department English requirement form.

303. ENGLISH LITERATURE SURVEY III (3)

Survey of the Victorian and Twentieth Century eras in English literature to the present. Emphasizes major writers. Course rotation is stated on the Humanities Department English requirement form.

330. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3)

(Cross-listed with EDUC 330.) Survey of children's literature with application for the various grade levels. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+. Note: Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors (only) may use this course to meet the "Reading and Imagination" requirement in the Core Curriculum. The course may not be used for the "Humanities" Option in the Core Curriculum.

331. SHAKESPEARE (3)

(Cross-listed with THTR 331.) A study of selected drama by Shakespeare: comedies, history plays, and tragedies. This course may be used to fulfill the Reading and Imagination Requirement or Humanities Elective in the Core Curriculum. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

332. THE AGE OF MILTON (3)

A study of the great Puritan and his works, particularly Paradise Lost. Offered alternate years. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

334. MASTERPIECES OF DRAMA (3)

(Cross-listed with THTR 334.) Examination of representative plays with attention to historical development, form, theme, and the impact of trends of thought. Offered alternate years.

335. LITERARY FORMS OF THE BIBLE (3)

Understanding and appreciation of the Bible as a masterpiece written in various literary forms. Offered on occasion. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN ENGLISH (1)

Study of the fundamentals of teaching English in secondary schools (grades 9-12) with attention to a variety of methods, strategies, and other aids.

341. TECHNICAL WRITING (3)

(Cross-listed with COMM 341.) Focuses on skills in writing tasks normally encountered in the work world, including various types of business correspondence, mechanism and process description, instructions, proposals, and reports. Some assignments involve subject matter from the student's major area of study. Prerequisite: ENGL 111 and EU Writing Proficiency.

344. THE NOVEL AND SHORT FICTION (3)

Study of forms of fiction in a developmental context, concentrating on fiction since 1875. Prerequisite: one literature course or permission of professor and ACT/ENG 22+.

353. MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM AND METHODS/LANGUAGE ARTS (3)

Study of the fundamentals of teaching English in middle schools (grades 5-9) with attention to a variety of methods, strategies, and other aids.

373. MODERN AMERICAN AUTHORS (3)

Study of significant 20th-century American literature, including works by Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, O'Neill, and other selected writers. Offered alternate years. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

398. TEACHING OF WRITING (1)

An opportunity for English and English Education majors to teach writing skills related to grammar, mechanics, and paragraph structure with emphasis on the academic essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 298.

436. CREATIVE WRITING (3)

(Cross-listed with COMJ 436.) Imaginative writing, providing guidance and practice in at least two of the following genres: poetry, fiction, drama. Includes submitting work to national publications. Prerequisites: EU Writing Proficiency; one literature course; and one of the following: ENGL 211, ENGL 236, ENGL/COMM 205, or permission of professor. This course may not be used to satisfy the Effective Communication requirement in the Core Curriculum.

440. CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND MODERN LITERATURE (3)

(Cross-listed with THEO 440) A survey of writers who deal significantly with matters of Christian faith in their works.

445. HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3)

(Cross-listed with TESL 445.) Introduction to modern linguistic analysis (including semantics, syntax, phonology, and structural and transformational-generative approaches to grammar) and a brief history of the English language (including historical forces leading to changes, internal changes based on structure and phonetics, and English dialects). Offered alternate years in the spring. Prerequisite for English-program students: ENGL 298. Prerequisite for TEFL and TESOL students: TESL 433 or TESL 436. Highly recommended: ENGL 298 (one of the TESOL-Minor electives).

455. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3)

(Cross-listed with THTR 455.) Poetry, fiction, and drama written primarily by British and American authors since about 1950. Course content varies each time. Recommended: ACT/ENG 22+.

490. DIRECTED READINGS OR RESEARCH (1-3)

Personal study in literature of one's interest or to fill gaps in one's scope of knowledge. Prerequisite: permission of supervising professor and Department Chair.

493/293. PROBLEMS (1-3)

Offered on demand.

494/294. TRAVEL (1-3)

Offered on demand.

496. SEMINAR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE LITERATURE (3)

Designed especially for English majors, concentrations, and minors. Available to juniors and seniors only.

497. SENIOR SEMINAR (3)

Critical reading and writing and development of research skills with an emphasis on literary criticism. Addresses job opportunities, preparation of a resumé, and available professional organizations for English majors. Note: English and English Education majors are assessed by a nationally-standardized test for academic outcomes. Prerequisites: ENGL 212. HUMN 431 is highly recommended.

498/298. PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Offered on demand.

TESOL: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESL)

The growing number of English-language learners in the United States and abroad has multiplied the need for qualified teachers of English as a second or a foreign language. TESOL training from a recognized academic institution is widely accepted as qualification to teach in this field; thus, it can open doors to employment and/or ministry in a variety of domestic and international settings.

The TESOL Minor is open to Evangel students in any major who have at least sophomore standing and EU Writing Proficiency status.  It will prepare students to teach English as a second language in the United States and as a foreign language abroad.  The Minor consists of 18 required credits (TESL 433, 436, 445, 439, 336, and 497) and 3 elective credits (ENGL 298, TESL 456, TESL 438, or TESL 493), for a total of 21 credits. Education majors successfully completing the Minor will also complete the ESOL Endorsement requirements for certification in the state of Missouri. Each state in the U.S. has its own certification requirements, which usually involve training at the level of at least a minor, so students intending to teach in other states should check for ESOL reciprocity agreements with Missouri.  Evangel's program is calibrated with the requirements of Missouri's Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE).  Students in the TESOL Minor program must achieve a grade of at least C- in each course for the TESOL Minor.

 
The TEFL Certificate--which does not take the place of a minor--is available to Evangel students of all majors who have at least sophomore standing and EU Writing Proficiency status.  This certificate will prepare students to teach English as a foreign language in an overseas setting.  It does not, however, certify a person to teach ESL in Missouri or most other U.S. public-school systems. (Each state has its own certification requirements, which usually involve training at the level of at least a minor.)  The Program requires 14 credit hours of work in the following courses:  TESL 433, 436, 445, 336, and 497.  (Note: this sequence is recommended.)  Students in the TEFL Certificate Program must achieve a grade of at least C- in each course in the Program.
 
 

TESL Courses

336. ESL METHODS (3)

Provides a knowledge of materials and methods for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Should be taken concurrently with TESL 497 (Practicum). Prerequisites: TESL 433, TESL 436, and TESL 445. May be taken concurrently with TESL 445.

433. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3)

Focuses on the interrelationships of language and culture, aspects of linguistic and cultural diversity, cross-cultural communications, and cultural issues in the classroom. Emphasizes techniques for fostering cooperative learning, resolving conflicts, and meeting student needs in multicultural and language classrooms. Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing and official EU Writing Proficiency.

436. SECOND-LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (3)

Theories and models of second-language acquisition. Psychological, political, and socio-cultural factors' contribution to second-language acquisition, processes involved in acquiring a second language, and instructional implications of recent findings. Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing and official EU Writing Proficiency.

438. COMPONENT AREAS OF TESOL (3)

This course will delve into the details of teaching the four component areas of TESOL: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Recent research into such teaching will be presented, and specific teaching concerns will be addressed. The course will systematically analyze the unique factors and guidelines in teaching each of the four skills, with specific focus upon pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Issues addressing literacy will be covered. Prerequisites: TESL 433, 436, 445, 439, and 336.

439. ESL MATERIALS AND CURRICULUM (3)

Review and analysis of curriculum, materials, and assessment tools currently used in professional teaching of English to speakers of other languages; research-based discussion of up-to-date practices in course design that most effectively reach second-language students. Prerequisites: TESL 433, TESL 436, and TESL 445.

445. HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3)

(Cross-listed with ENGL 445) Introduction to modern linguistic analysis (including semantics, syntax, phonology, and structural and transformational-generative approaches to grammar) and a brief history of the English language (including historical forces leading to changes, internal changes based on structure and phonetics, and English dialects). Offered each spring. Prerequisite for TESOL minors and TEFL Certificate students: TESL 433 or TESL 436. Recommended: ENGL 298.

456. ESL ASSESSMENT AND PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR (3)

A critical study of pedagogical English grammar for English Language Learners of all ages with an emphasis on assessment practices. Prerequisites: TESL 433, 436, and 445.

493. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TESOL (3)

This course will cover issues related to ESL teaching situations in K-12 schools in the United States. Particular issues covered will include the following: making content accessible to ELLs through scaffolding and sheltering techniques; aligning formative and summative assessments for ELLs with non-language assessments; working with classroom teachers and administrators. Prerequisites: TESL 433, 436, 439, and 336.

497. PRACTICUM IN ESL INSTRUCTION (1-3)

Practicum in ESL Instruction (1-3 credits)(Cross-listed with TES 597) Students in the course will be assigned to an ESL/EFL teaching situation for at least 40-45 hours of supervised academic activity per credit hour.

Ideal Sequence for the TESOL Minor

 

§TESL 433 Language and Culture

§TESL 436 Second-Language Acquisition

§TESL 439 TESOL Materials, Curriculum, and Assessment

§TESL 445 History and Structure of the English Language

§TESL 336 ESL Methods

§TESOL Elective Course

§TESL 497 Practicum in ESL Instruction

 

TESOL Minor: Possible Course Schedule

 

Fall

Spring

Sophomore Year

§TESL 433 Language and Culture

§TESL 436 Second-Language Acquisition

§TESL 445 History and Structure of the English Language

§TESL 439 TESOL Materials, Curriculum, and Assessments

Junior Year

§TESL 336 ESL Methods

§TESOL Elective Course

Senior Year

§TESL 497 Practicum in ESL Instruction

  Open for student teaching for those receiving state certification OR for TESL 497 if it was not taken in the fall.

 

Ideal Sequence for the TEFL Certificate

§TESL 433 Language and Culture

§TESL 436 Second-Language Acquisition

§TESL 445 History and Structure of the English Language

§TESL 439 TESOL Materials, Curriculum, and Assessment

§TESL 336 ESL Methods

§TESL 497 Practicum in ESL Instruction

 

TEFL Certificate: Possible Course Schedule

 

Fall

Spring

Sophomore Year
(433 or 436 may be taken concurrently with 445 in the spring)

§TESL 433 Language and Culture

§TESL 436 Second-Language Acquisition

Junior Year

 

§TESL 445 History and Structure of the English Language

Senior Year

§TESL 336 ESL Methods

§TESL 497 Practicum in ESL Instruction

 

 

Modern Language Studies

The language program provides students with the basic lexical and grammatical foundations for reading, writing, and comprehending a foreign language.

All entering freshmen who have had two or more secondary-school years of any of the languages taught by the University are required to take a placement test if they wish to be considered for advanced standing in that language.  Each student is placed in a course at the level specified by his or her test score. Students who place in a language course above the 115 level may earn retroactive credit (i.e., credit for courses below the level of the course in which they are enrolled), if they earn at least 80 percent (B-) in the advanced course. A maximum of 14 credits of language study may be earned this way. The credit may be applied toward a minor, a concentration, a major, or the foreign-language requirement for a B.A. degree.  Note: this advanced-placement provision does not include credit for composition, conversation, or literature courses in the student's foreign-language program.

Each of the language programs (major, concentration, or minor) represents a level of performance rather than a specific number of credits. Therefore, requirements may be met either by college/university classroom credit or by a combination of credit and equivalent performance (e.g., waiving of courses through appropriate scores on the language credit exam). Elective courses should be taken to meet the total graduation requirement. In the case of students who are native speakers or who demonstrate superior performance in any of the foreign languages taught, substitutions of course requirements may be made at the instructor's discretion, subject to approval by the Department Chair. The SPAN 290-499 series is limited to 3 credit hours for the major or minor.

A French concentration consists of 26 credits, including FREN 215-216 (or the equivalent), 325, 326, 333, and 334.

A French minor consists of 20 credits, including FREN 215-216 (or the equivalent), FREN 325, and 3 upper-division (300-400 level) French elective credits.  In most cases, the elective will be FREN 326 (Conversation). The only other regularly scheduled options are FREN 333 and 334 (Survey of French Literature).

A student may also plan an interdisciplinary program. Such programs require two concentrations or one concentration and two minors. Concentrations that work well with a foreign language are English, History, Social Studies, and another foreign language.

A Spanish major requires 32 credits and must include SPAN 215-216 (or the equivalent), 325, and 326. A minimum of three courses in Spanish literature are required from the following: SPAN 337, 338, 347, 348, 447, or 448.  One elective may be a non-literature course from the range of occasional offerings between SPAN 290/490 and 299/499.

A Spanish concentration requires 26 credits and must include SPAN 215-216 (or the equivalent), 325, 326, and two upper-division Spanish literature courses.

A Spanish minor requires 20 credits and must include SPAN 215-216 (or the equivalent), SPAN 325, and 3 upper-division (300-400 level) elective credits. In most cases, the elective will be SPAN 326 (Conversation). The only other regularly scheduled options are SPAN 447 and 448 (Representative Latin-American Authors), which require permission of the instructor if SPAN 326 has not been taken.

French Courses (FREN)

115-116. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (4 each)

Elements of French grammar and the most commonly used idiomatic patterns with both oral and written exercises. The second semester includes readings in French history, customs, and literature. Meets 5 days a week. No prerequisite.

215-216. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH (3 each)

Review of grammar and study of selected specimens of literature to develop fluency in reading. Conducted in French as much as possible. Prerequisites: FREN 115 and 116 or equivalent.

325. COMPOSITION (3)

Advanced grammar, original composition, and translation. Prerequisite: FREN 216 or equivalent.

326. CONVERSATION (3)

Assists in mastering oral expression. Prerequisite: FREN 216 or equivalent. Alternates with FREN 334 in course schedule.

333-334. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE (3 each)

Study of the most important works of literature from the Middle Ages through the first half of the 20th century. Prerequisite: FREN 216 or equivalent. Alternates with FREN 325 and 326 in course schedule.

336. METHODS OF TEACHING FRENCH (3)

Fundamentals of teaching foreign language in secondary schools with attention to a variety of methods, strategies, and other aids.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS OR RESEARCH (1-2)

Personal study in French in one's area of interest or to fill gaps in one's knowledge. Prerequisite: Consent of department head and supervising professor.

293/493. PROBLEMS (1-3)

Special studies or seminars in French designed by the department to fill particular needs.

294/494. TRAVEL (1-3)

An opportunity to be enriched linguistically and culturally through travel and study in a French-speaking country.

296/496. SEMINAR (1-3)

For junior and senior students with French concentrations.

298/498. PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. RESEARCH (1-3)

Offered on demand.

Spanish Courses (SPAN)

115-116. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (4 each)

Elements of Spanish grammar and the most commonly used idiomatic patterns with oral and written exercises. Second semester includes readings in Spanish history, customs, and literature. No prerequisite. Meets 5 days a week.

215-216. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (3 each)

Review of grammar and study of selected specimens of literature to develop fluency in reading. Class conducted in Spanish as much as possible. Prerequisites: SPAN 115 and 116 or equivalent.

325. COMPOSITION (3)

Advanced grammar, original composition, and translation. Prerequisite: SPAN 216 or equivalent. Serves as a prerequisite for all other 300- and 400-level courses.

326. CONVERSATION (3)

Assists students in mastering oral expression. Prerequisite: SPAN 216 or equivalent. Serves as a prerequisite for all other 300- and 400-level courses.

336. METHODS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION (3)

Fundamentals of teaching foreign language in secondary schools with attention to a variety of methods, strategies, and other aids.

337-338. GOLDEN AGE LITERATURE (3 each)

Survey of peninsular Spanish Renaissance and Baroque literature, including the major authors and genres. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 325 and 326.

347-348. 19TH- AND 20TH-CENTURY LITERATURE (3 each)

Study of the major authors and trends of modern Spanish literature. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 325 and 326.

447-448. REPRESENTATIVE LATIN-AMERICAN AUTHORS (3 each)

Masterpieces of Latin American authors from the Colonial period to Contemporary trends. Lectures and class discussions conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 325 and 326 or permission of professor.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS (1-2)

Personal study in Spanish in one's interest area or to fill gaps in one's knowledge. Prerequisite: Permission of department head and supervising professor.

293/493. PROBLEMS (1-3)

Special studies or seminars in Spanish designed by the department to fill particular needs.

294/494. TRAVEL (1-3)

The opportunity to be enriched linguistically and culturally through travel and study in a Spanish-speaking country.

296/496. SEMINAR (1-3)

Designed for students with concentrations and majors. Open to juniors and seniors.

298/498. PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. RESEARCH (1-3)

Offered on demand.

Foreign Language Certification

  • In the State of Missouri, certification to teach a foreign language in K-12 requires 30 semester hours in that language or 27 semester hours plus 2 more earned units of high-school credit in that language.
  • To teach a foreign language in K-9, 21 semester hours are required in that language or 18 semester hours plus 2 or more earned units of high-school credit in that language.
  • In addition, students must complete all the requirements for Secondary Education, which include a course in subject-area methods and another in student-teaching. 

Foreign Language Institute Courses (FLI)

Evangel students may study several other modern foreign languages by enrolling in courses offered by the Foreign Language Institute, a consortium of area colleges and universities headquartered at Missouri State University.  The collaboration of those schools allows EU students to study less-commonly-taught languages such as Arabic, Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, and Russian to complete their BA foreign-language requirement or simply to bolster another degree program and prepare for anticipated use of such a language.  Wherever the courses are taught in Springfield, our students register for the courses at Evangel and pay Evangel tuition.  Most such courses are taught at MSU, which operates the Institute’s website at http://fli.missouristate.edu/, where a great deal of information can be found.

All Foreign Language Institute course offerings begin with the FLI prefix in Evangel’s Course Schedule, which is published each semester:

FLIA: Arabic            FLIJ: Japanese

FLIC: Chinese         FLIK: Korean

FLIG: German         FLIP: Portuguese

FLII: Italian             FLIR: Russian

Course offerings vary semester by semester according to the schedule(s) of the offering school; however, the eight languages listed above are consistently offered.

Most, if not all, of the languages taught in the Institute offer both Beginning and Intermediate levels of instruction.  If students already have some proficiency in a given FLI language, they may be tested for advanced placement and earn retroactive credit (i.e., credit for courses in that language below the level of the course in which they are enrolled) if they earn at least 80 percent (B-) in the first advanced course.

Study-Abroad Program

EU provides opportunities for studying abroad. With approval by the Studies Abroad Committee, students may spend one summer, one semester, or the junior year in another country. Any study-abroad course taken through an accredited American college or university may be transferred to EU. The number of credits accepted toward the major or minor are determined in consultation with the academic advisor. Courses taken at foreign institutions are evaluated, and credit is granted on the basis of course content and applicability. Financial assistance is available through the Financial Aid Office.

Interdisciplinary Program: Humanities

Recognizing that a fragmented approach to knowledge is one of the pitfalls of contemporary higher education, Evangel University offers the Interdisciplinary Humanities minor to encourage students and faculty to broaden their perspectives and integrate their knowledge. This minor's cultural breadth and structural flexibility complements all majors, especially those leading to instruction in humanities curricula and interdisciplinary studies on the elementary and secondary levels.

The Humanities minor requires 18-20 credits and must include HUMN 231 (3), 233 (3), and 431 (3). The remaining 9-11 credits must be taken in at least two of the elective areas listed below and from the list of specific elective courses in the chosen areas. Of these 9-11 elective credits, a minimum of 6 must be on the upper-division (300-400) level. Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors (only) may use ENGL 330 toward fulfilling that requirement. Students must work closely with their advisors to develop this minor, select the proper courses, and monitor their progress. The list of specific elective courses is available from advisors in the various departments.

Humanities Courses (HUMN)

100. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR (1)

This introductory course helps new Evangel students acclimatize themselves to the University. As such, it serves as an intellectual and practical orientation to the challenges and opportunities of University life and learning. Students are introduced to Evangel’s Christ-centered, integrational, exploratory, and global ethos. They learn to use and participate in campus-wide and department-specific offerings. They build relationships within departmental contexts as well as across campus. They are encouraged to understand that they are being prepared not only for a career but for life.

230. INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN HUMANITIES (3)

Meets the Core Curriculum requirement for either the "Reading and Imagination" Option or the "Humanities" Option. Introduction to the historical contexts of ideas and their manifestations in literature, the visual arts, and music. No prerequisite. May be taken after HUMN 232 or HUMN 233.

231. INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN HUMANITIES (3)

Survey of trends shared by the Western humanities from ancient through medieval times. Studies the movement of ideas and their historical backgrounds through an integration of literature, the visual arts, and music. Encourages students to broaden their knowledge of Western cultural traditions. No prerequisite. May be taken before or after HUMN 232 or HUMN 233.

232. INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN HUMANITIES II: RENAISSANCE-MODERN (2)

Meets the General Education fine arts requirement. Introduction to the historical contexts of ideas and their manifestations in literature, the visual arts, and music. No prerequisite. May be taken before or after HUMN 230 or HUMN 231.

233. INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN HUMANITIES II: RENAISSANCE-REALISM (3)

Survey of trends shared by the Western humanities from the European Renaissance through the period of Realism. Studies the movement of ideas and their historical backgrounds through an integration of literature, the visual arts, and music. Encourages students to broaden their knowledge of Western cultural traditions. No prerequisite. May be taken before or after HUMN 230 or HUMN 231.

240. CULTURE (3)

A study of how cultural products reflect a cultural context, giving attention to religion as a cultural element and to art and music in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the West. Prerequisite: BIBL 111. May be used to satisfy the "Artistic Expression" requirement in the Core Curriculum.

431. WESTERN HUMANITIES: MODERN/POST-MODERN (3)

(Cross-listed with PHIL 471.) Survey of trends shared by the Western humanities from Impressionism through post-modernism. Studies the movement of ideas and their historical backgrounds through an integration of literature, the visual arts, and music. Encourages students to broaden their knowledge of Western cultural traditions and contemporary ideological currents. Capstone course for the Humanities minor. Taught every other year. Recommended preparation: HUMN 230 and/or 240.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS (1-2)

Offered on demand.

293/493. PROBLEMS (1-3)

Offered on demand.

294/494. TRAVEL (1-3)

Credit for national or foreign travel when supported by appropriate written reports. With permission of Department or area, students receive credit if travel is under the advice and/or sponsorship of an appropriate faculty member.

296/496. SEMINAR IN HUMANITIES (1-3)

Offered on demand.

298/498. PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Offered on demand.

299/499. RESEARCH (1-3)

Offered on demand.

Elective Courses for the Humanities Minor (9-11 credits)

Select from the specific course list in at least two of the following areas: Anthropology, Art, Bible, Communication, Economics, Education, English, French, Geography, Government, General Science, History, Missions, Philosophy, Marketing, Music, Psychology, Religion, Theatre, Theology, Sociology, Spanish, Social Science, and Social Work. At least 6 elective credits must be earned in upper-division (300-400 level) courses.

Theatre Arts

A Theatre major requires 34 credits, including THTR 130, 140, 230, 231, 239/339 (minimum of 2 credits), 243, 321, 327, 328, 330, 331, 335, 340, 344, 433, and THTR 455 OR 456 (Senior Capstone).

Theatre majors are encouraged to choose electives from ART 110, THTR 298/498, THTR 441, 443, MRKT 239, COEM 175, COMM 246, COMR 333, COMR 372, COMS 316.

A Theatre concentration requires 30 credits: 130, 140, 230, 239, 243, 271, 321, 327, 328, 335, 340, and 344. Remaining credits may be chosen from THTR 330, 339, 341, 441, or 443.

A Theatre minor requires 24 credits, including THTR 130, 140, 239, 243, 271, 327, 335, and 344. Remaining credits may be chosen from THTR 321, 328, 331, 340, 341, 441, or 443.

Theatre/Speech Education Major

The following courses are required for a Theatre/Speech Education major: COMM 211, COMS 233, COMM 246, COMS 335, COMS 316 (twice for a total of 2 credits); THTR 130, 140, 230, 239, 243, 271, 321, 327, 328, 330, 331, 340, 341, 344, and 445 (for a total of 43 credits). THTR 336 is a collateral course requirement for certification which does not count toward the major requirement. See the Department of Education section for Secondary Education requirements.

Theatre/Music Major

The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre/Music (with an emphasis in either music or theatre) is a comprehensive major consisting of 63-65 credit hours. This degree offers an option to the student who has a strong interest in musical theatre to pursue an emphasis in either music or theatre.

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE/MUSIC

The following courses are required for a Theatre/Music major with a Theatre Emphasis: MUSIC CORE (MUSC 113, 141, 142, 143, and 144; MUED 235 and 333 for a total of 17 credits); THEATRE CORE (THTR 130, 140, 328, 335, 243, 344, and 496 for a total of 18 credits); PERFORMANCE (Applied Primary-4 credits, Major Ensembles-2 credits, MUED 333, VOIC 911, THTR 239, and THTR 496 for a total of 13 credits); THEATRE EMPHASIS (THTR 140, 239, 243, 321, 328, 331, 339, and 340, for a total of 17 credits).

Theatre Courses (THTR)

110. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)

This lecture/experiential course is designed to enhance the students' ability to enjoy, appreciate and communicate the aesthetic principles of theatre as a collaborative and necessary art and a reflection of the human experience. Course meets CORE CURRICULUM requirement for Artistic Expression.

130. STAGECRAFT LAB (2)

Introduction to technical theatre and creation of scenic elements. Study of theatrical construction, including use of building tools, machines, and painting techniques; types of theatrical scenery; and backstage organization. Course combines lecture and practical lab experience gained by working on Evangel University theatrical productions.

140. MAKEUP FOR THE STAGE (2)

Instruction in the basic principles and techniques of makeup for the stage, followed by extensive lab experience. Students will explore concepts of facial structure, aging, and style and will observe demonstrations of basic techniques. Purchase of a theatrical makeup kit is required.

230. STAGECRAFT LAB II (1)

Practical experience in Evangel University theatrical productions using stagecraft tools and techniques from THTR 130. Includes a segment on Stage Management. Prerequisite: THTR 130.

239. REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE (1)

The beginning actor develops a character as part of an Evangel University theatrical production. Emphasis on character, beat analysis, and stage chemistry. May be repeated once for a second credit

243. ACTING I WITH LAB (3)

(Cross-listed with COMS 243.) Introduction to the basic skills of acting; the development of imagination, self-awareness, body control and voice; the techniques of stage movement; textual analysis; creation of character, and rehearsal expectations through individual and group exercises, improvisations, monologues and scene studies. Previous theatre study NOT required.

271. TECHNICAL THEATRE I: SCENIC DESIGN (2)

Introductory classroom and lab study of the principles of modern scene design for the theatre using the techniques of drawing/drafting, script analysis, ground plans and construction of set models. Course fee for materials required. Prerequisite: THTR 130.

321. TECHNICAL THEATRE II: LIGHTING DESIGN (2)

Introduction to the practical and artistic elements of theatrical lighting design. Includes study of design basics, lighting instruments, and the use of such instruments as they pertain to theatrical applications. Prerequisites: THTR 130 and 271.

327. HISTORY OF THEATRE I (2)

An intensive study of theatre history regarding dramatic texts, practitioners, physical staging, and conventions from pre-Grecian times to the early 18th century. Emphasis on connections between theatre and culture.

328. HISTORY OF THEATRE II (2)

Continued intensive study of theatre history regarding dramatic texts, practitioners, physical staging, and conventions from the early 18th century through the present day. Emphasis on connections between theatre and culture. Prerequisite: THTR 327 or permission of professor.

330. STAGECRAFT LAB III (1)

Advanced lab experience in constructing, painting, and erecting sets for Evangel University and community theatrical productions. Prerequisite: THTR 230.

331. SHAKESPEARE (3)

(Cross-listed with ENGL 331.) Study of selected drama by Shakespeare: comedies, history plays, and tragedies. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ENGL 22+ or SAT 410+.

335. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE (3)

(Cross-listed with COMS 335.) Participation in the interpretation of drama and group performance of literature.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SPEECH/THEATER (1)

Study of the fundamentals of teaching drama and speech in secondary schools.

339. REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE (1)

Advanced rehearsal and performance techniques including in-depth character and script analyses as applied to a character for an Evangel University production. May be repeated once for a second credit.

340. ACTING II WITH LAB (3)

Concentrated study of ways to use the actor's inner resources to produce effective enactments of dramatic texts. Much studio scene-work allows the student-actor to practice using those resources in performance. Prerequisite: THTR 243 or permission of professor.

341. TECHNICAL THEATRE III: COSTUME DESIGN (2)

Introduction to basic elements and processes of costume design, including character/script analysis; research; visual design ideas and techniques; and manual and machine sewing skills related to the basics of creating and altering clothes. Knowledge of fabrics and other materials as well as costume history will also be explored. Prerequisites: THTR 130, 271.

344. DIRECTING FUNDAMENTALS WITH LAB (3)

An introductory course in directing for the stage. Topics include the role and function of the director in the contemporary theater; basic tools of proscenium blocking and staging, such as composition, picturization, movement, and gesture; structural script analysis; and basic actor-coaching techniques. Prerequisites: THTR 130, 271, 243, 340, and 327.

393. PROBLEMS IN THEATRE (2)

Offered on demand.

441. TECHNICAL THEATRE IV: DRAMATRUGY (2)

This elective course focuses on building the skills and knowledge necessary for a dramaturgical analysis of plays for production. Includes close study of performance texts and source material with an emphasis on dramaturgical techniques and an overview of the history and theory of the dramaturg. Theatre majors and minors planning to attend graduate school or pursue directing are strongly encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: THTR 243, 327, 328, 340.

443. ACTING III WITH LAB (3)

This elective course explores techniques for textual analysis of poetic and prose drama. Class involves extensive scene-work from Classical Greek, Medieval, Shakespearean, and modern texts. One unit of the course is devoted to stage combat techniques. Prerequisites: THTR 243, 340 or permission of professor. Theatre majors and minors planning to attend graduate school or who wish to pursue a career in acting are strongly encouraged to take this course.

445. SENIOR CAPSTONE: DIRECTING/SHOWCASE (1)

Directing/showcase experience will occur during fall or spring semester of the senior year. NOTE: Speech/Theatre Education majors MUST take this option. Departmental approval of the directing/showcase experience must be secured during the junior year. Prerequisites: THTR 243, 271, 321, 327, 341, 328, 340, 344, and consultation with senior professor.

446. SENIOR CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP (0)

An intensive internship with a local, regional, or national theatre. May be taken during the fall, spring, or summer semester of senior year. Departmental approval of internship must be secured during the junior year. Prerequisites: THTR 243, 271, 321, 327, 341, 328, 340, 344, and consultation with senior professor.

290/490. DIRECTED READINGS IN THEATRE/INTERPRETATION (1-2)

Offered on demand.

293/493. PROBLEMS IN THEATRE (1-3)

Offered on demand.

294/494. TRAVEL-THEATRE/INTERPRETATION (1-3)

Offered on demand.

296/496. SEMINAR IN THEATRE/INTERPRETATION (1-3)

Offered on demand.

298/498. INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM IN THEATRE/INTERPRETATION (1-3)

Offered on demand.