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Department of Natural and Applied Sciences

Students are attracted to majors in the Department of Natural and Applied Sciences because of the following:

POWERFUL IMPACT: Our majors significantly impact people’s lives through medical care, sustainability training, and science research.

GREAT VALUE: Our majors provide the highest rates of return for educational investments.

SERVING GOD IN SCIENCE: Our faculty help students discern their vocational calling within the sciences. Science and faith are partners in the achievement of excellence in scientific vocations.

JOB SECURITY: Workers in the health professions, computers, and research are in high demand and earn good pay.

REAL LIFE EXPERIENCES: Our majors gain valuable on-the-job reality experiences through mentored research projects, internships, and job shadowing.

SUCCESS ASSURED: While pursuing their callings, our students have very high acceptance rates into graduate professional and research programs and in securing solid employment.

Majors are available in Applied Science and Sustainability, Biology, Biological Chemistry, Biology Education, Chemistry, Chemistry Education, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Health Care - Nursing, Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Mathematics Education.

Minors are available in Applied Science, Agronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Forensic Science, General Science, Mathematics, Physical Science, and Physics.

Pre-professional tracks are available in Pre-Nursing, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Engineering, Pre-Physician Assistant, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Veterinary Medicine, Pre-Optometry, Pre-Chiropractic, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Physical Therapy, and other programs that can be developed to meet students' needs.

Students planning to teach secondary school may choose a Biology Education, Chemistry Education, or Mathematics Education major and complete the Secondary Education professional requirements in the Department of Education for teacher certification.

All programs in the Department fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. For a Bachelor of Arts degree, a student must include one year of foreign language.

Biology

The Biology curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to prepare for professional work in health sciences, prepare for teaching, pursue graduate work, train for semi-professional work in industry or civil service, or obtain a broad education in biology. Students planning for careers in medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacology, veterinary medicine, physician assistant, or physical therapy attend a graduate program in one of these disciplines after completing their Bachelor’s degree at EU.

The Biology major includes 66 credits as follows: MATH 231 or MATH 129, CPSC 101 or higher (or proficiency exam), CHEM 111, 112, 271 and 375 (CHEM 272 is highly recommended also), PHYS 211 and 212, BIOL 200, 201, 202, 335, 338, 437, and 496. Four credits must be chosen from either BIOL 341, 342 or 343 plus at least 4 additional credits from BIOL 311, 312, 345,  or 448.

A Biology minor consists of 20 credits in biology and must include BIOL 200.

Biology Courses (BIOL)

101. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (3)

Introductory course in biological science emphasizing the development of critical thinking skills in science, procedure skills, and content competency. Laboratory is required and involves scientific inquiry methods and a research component. Fulfills a General Education Core science requirement. Biology majors should take BIOL 200. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered every semester including summer.

101. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 101 lecture.

123. NUTRITION (3)

The nutritional requirements of human beings with emphasis on the roles of nutrients throughout the life cycle. Fulfills a General Education Core science requirement. Offered every semester including summer.

124. HUMAN BIOLOGY (3)

An integrated approach to understanding the physiology and anatomy of the human body. It includes a unit on origins and a unit on bioethics. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week.

124. HUMAN BIOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 124 lecture.

131. WORLD AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS (3)

Study of agro-environmental characteristics of world agriculture; historical and contemporary features of world food production. This is a survey course exploring the interactions between agriculture and human societies (past and present). It includes historical discussions of the world's major food crops and farming methods, current agricultural systems on our planet, the role that climate and soils play in agricultural systems, and how agriculture and the rest of our environment interact. Contemporary applications are also made. Other than expecting some basic science background, there are no prerequisites courses required.

200. GENERAL BIOLOGY (3)

First course in a four-course sequence for Biology and Applied Science and Sustainability majors intended to develop critical thinking skills in science. Introduces cell biology and genetics. Also considers concepts important in contemporary society. Laboratory is required and involves scientific inquiry methods and a research component. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered fall semester.

200. GENERAL BIOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 200 lecture.

201. ZOOLOGY (3)

Second course in a four-course sequence required for Biology and Applied Science and Sustainability majors. Primarily the study of zoology with emphases on adaptations, taxonomy, and physiology. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Offered spring semester.

201. ZOOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 200 lecture.

202. BOTANY (3)

Third course in a four-course sequence required for Biology and Applied Science and Sustainability majors. Primarily the study of botany with the study of fungi and ecology. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Offered fall semester.

202. BOTANY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 202 lecture.

211. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES I (3)

Introduction to human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on the roles of homeostasis and pathology and their interactions. Required for nursing students. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered fall semester.

211. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES I LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 211 lecture.

212. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES II (3)

Second half of the introductory course in human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on the roles of homeostasis and pathology and their interactions. Required for nursing students. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered spring semester.

212. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES II LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 212.

221. HUMAN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (3)

Survey of human anatomy and function with emphasis on physical performance. Prerequisite for PHED 441 and SWK 271. Includes two hours of anatomy and two hours of physiology. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week.

221. HUMAN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 221 lecture.

235. MICROBIOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES (3)

Study of microorganisms and their growth and control. Emphasis on bacteria of medical importance, aseptic lab procedures, and care in the medical environment. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Required for nursing students. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Offered spring semester.

235. MICROBIOLOGY/HEALTH SCIENCE LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 235 lecture.

293. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1)

Elective work in a field of biological interest. By permission only.

298. INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Special projects for Biology majors. This involves working in some vocation related to biology under the supervision of both a facility manager (e.g. Physician) and an academic advisor. Department approval required.

311. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (3)

Introduction to the study of human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on the roles of homeostasis and pathology and their interactions. Intended for students interested in a health-related career, such as medicine, dentistry, physician assistant, and physical therapy. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered fall semester.

311. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 311 lecture.

312. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (3)

Second half of the introductory course in human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on the roles of homeostasis and pathology and their interactions. Intended for students interested in a health-related career, such as medicine, dentistry, physician assistant, and physical therapy. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Offered spring semester.

312. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 312 lecture.

320. PLANT PROPAGATION (3)

This course is designed to encourage an interest, understanding, and appreciation of the principles and techniques of plant propagation, and to enhance skills in finding and understanding published research about scientific advances in plant propagation.

334. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (2)

Comprehensive introduction to medical terminology. Organized by body systems with emphases on anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and diagnostic treatments and procedures. Offered fall semester and summer. Online.

335. MICROBIOLOGY (3)

Fourth course in a four-course sequence required for Biology and Applied Science and Sustainability majors. Study of microorganisms and their growth and control. Emphasis on prokaryotic cells, especially bacteria of medical, ecological, and industrial importance. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and CHEM 112. Offered spring semester.

335. MICROBIOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 335 lecture.

338. MOLECULAR AND CLASSICAL GENETICS (3)

Genetics topics that were covered broadly in general biology are studied in depth. Emphasis is placed on linking classical transmission genetics, molecular genetics, human genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. Three lecture hours and one 2-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 335. Offered fall semester.

338. MOLECULAR AND CLASSICAL GENETICS LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 338 lecture.

341. MARINE BIOLOGY (3)

Study of field biology procedures/theories with particular emphasis on marine biology. Two lecture hours per week during spring semester; 2-week field trip during summer. Prerequisite: One course in biology. Offered spring semester, odd years.

341. MARINE BIOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 341 lecture.

342. ECOLOGY (3)

Basic ecological theories and practice. Field trips required. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 202. Offered alternate fall semesters.

342. ECOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 342 lecture.

343. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (3)

The influence of environmental factors including geology, climate, water, wastes, and political factors on plants, animals, and microbes and their interactions. Conservation/utilization, population growth and sustainability of resources, and ethics. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: one course in biology. Offered alternate fall semesters.

343. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 343 lecture.

345. BIOLOGICAL STATISTICS RESEARCH APPLICATIONS (4)

Intermediate and advanced statistical methods, research design, and research proposals for the biological sciences. Required for the research track of the Biology major. Prerequisite: MATH 210. Offered spring semester.

360. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3)

The physiological responses to disease, stress, and the environment, including a review of basic human physiology. Required for nursing students. Prerequisite: BIOL 212 or 312. Offered fall and summer semesters. Online.

375. BIOCHEMISTRY (3)

Chemistry related to life processes in plants and animals, including enzymes and metabolism as well as carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and nucleic acid chemistry. Three lecture hours per week and one 3-hour lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 271; BIOL 335 recommended. Offered fall semester.

375. BIOCHEMISTRY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL 375 lecture.

437. CELL BIOLOGY (3)

Study of cellular organization and function with primary emphasis on the eukaryotic cell. Required for Biology and Biological Chemistry majors. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 335 and BIOL/CHEM 375. Offered spring semester.

448. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)

Topics selected from specialized areas of biology not otherwise offered. Courses include vertebrate physiology, plant physiology, virology, medical botany, bacterial pathogenesis or advanced microbiology. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Offered on demand.

460. BIOETHICS (3)

Examine and explore the basic ethical principles and applications as they pertain to healthcare environments. This 3-credit course provides the opportunity for in-depth discussion of ethical principles. Extensive clinical situations and case analysis will also be utilized. Cross listed as PHIL 460.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3)

Research in a field of biological interest. By permission only and junior or senior standing.

496. SENIOR SEMINAR (1-2)

Further development of scientific research and writing skills. Includes at least one formal paper and a formal oral presentation. Required for Biology and Biological Chemistry majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Offered spring semester.

498. INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Special projects for Biology majors involving work in a vocation related to biology under the supervision of both a facility manager and an academic advisor. Department approval required.

Suggested Program Biology Major

First Year
Second Year
BIOL 200, 201
BIOL 202, 335
CHEM 111, 112
CHEM 271, 272
BIBL 111, 115
BIBL 116, 3xx
MATH 231 or MATH 129
MATH 210
Computer Proficiency
ENGL 341
Composition Proficiency
Core Curriculum
Core Curriculum
 
Third Year
Fourth Year
BIOL 341, 342 or 343
BIOL 338
BIOL electives (311, 312)
BIOL 496
PHYS 211, 212
BIOL electives
CHEM 375,  BIOL 437
Core Curriculum
BIOL electives
 
Core Curriculum
 

 Biological Chemistry

The biological chemistry major was designed to be an interdisciplinary major for biology or chemistry students that seek further graduate training in a biological, pharmaceutical or medical setting.  The major represents a solid first step for students who plan to enter graduate school to study molecular biology or other programs in life sciences.
 
The Biological Chemistry major includes 77 credits as follows: BIOL 200, BIOL 201, BIOL 335, BIOL 437, BIOL 496, CHEM 111-112, CHEM 271-272, CHEM 378, CHEM 375, CHEM 331 or 431, MATH 231, PHYS 211-212, CPSC 101 (or proficiency). Sixteen credits of BIOL or CHEM upper division elective coursework must also be taken.

    Suggested Program Biological Chemistry Major  

First Year

Second Year

BIOL 200, 201 BIOL 335
CHEM 111, 112 CHEM 271, 272
MATH 231 CHEM 378
BIBL 111, 115 PHYS 211, 212
 GSCI 100 ENGL 341  
CPSC 100 MATH 210
ENGL 111 BIBL 116

Third Year

Fourth Year

BIOL 311, 312 (or BIOL/CHEM elective) ICST 350
BIOL 437 BIOL 338
Bible Book Study BIOL 496
CHEM 375, 431 (or 331) 5 Core Curriculum courses
3 Core Curriculum courses BIOL/CHEM Elective

        

Biology Education

The Biology Education program represents a partnership between the Natural and Applied Sciences Department and the Education Department to provide a comprehensive major to prepare biology students for a career in secondary education.

All biology education majors must complete a total of 37 credit hours of secondary education courses as listed under Department of Education, Secondary Education.  Biology education majors must complete:  a) the Science Core Requirements and b) the subject certification track.

a) Science Core Requirements (33-35)

BIOL 200   General Biology (4)
BIOL 201   Zoology (4)
BIOL 202   Botany (4)
BIOL 335   Microbiology (4)
BIOL 336   Methods of Teaching Biology (3)
BIOL 342   Ecology (4) or BIOL 343 Environmental Biology (4) or BIOL 341 Marine Biology (4)
CHEM 110  Chemistry for Health Sciences (4)
GSCI 230    History and Philosophy of Science (3)
MATH 129  College Algebra/Trigonometry (3) or MATH 231 Calculus I (4)

b) Subject Certification Track Requirements (12-13)

BIOL upper division (300 or 400 level) elective (w/lab) (4)
GSCI 111  Geology (w/lab) (4) or GSCI 112 Meteorology (w/lab) (4)
GSCI 115  Physical Science (w/lab) (4) or PHYS 211 General Physics I (5)
     or PHYS 231Engineering Physics I (5)

Students majoring in Biology Education must meet all General Education and Department of Education, Secondary Education course requirements.

Chemistry

The chemistry curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students preparing for professional work in private industry or civil service, preparing to teach, qualifying for graduate work in the physical or applied sciences, biochemistry, training for professional work in health science disciplines, or obtaining a broad education in physical science.  Students preparing for careers in research and development, chemical analyses (including food analyses, forensics, or materials development), or medicine and other allied health fields, generally attend a professional or graduate program after earning a bachelor’s degree. A Chemistry major completes at least 75 credits of course work as follows:

CHEM 111, 112, 271, 272, 378, 331, 332, 431, 432, and 496, and one advanced elective course (40 credits), MATH 231, 232, and 233 (12 credits) [MATH 125 and 129 are taken first if needed], upper division Math (3 credits), CPSC 101 or 111 (3 credits), PHYS 231 and 232 (10 credits), electives (7 credits). 

A Chemistry minor consists of 22 semester hours of chemistry, which must include CHEM 111, 112, 271, and CHEM 272 and a choice of CHEM 331, 375, or 431. A concentration consists of 29-31 semester hours of chemistry, which must include CHEM 111,112, 271, 272, 378, 331 (or 431), 496, and two additional courses from CHEM 331, 332, 375, 431, 432, 435, or 445.

Chemistry Courses (CHEM)

101. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY (3)

A preparatory course emphasizing competency in the fundamentals and basic concepts of general chemistry. The development of critical thinking and mathematical skills in science along with problem solving procedure development is also covered. Three lectures per week. This course is designed for Science and Technology majors, but may be used to meet the general education science requirement with the approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: None.

110. CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES (3)

Fundamental concepts of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry primarily focused for application to nursing. Major topics include: molecular structure and bonding, chemical equations and associated calculations, solution calculations, states of matter, nuclear chemistry, the identification of primary organic functional groups and their reactions, and the basic chemistry of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, amino acids, and DNA. Critical thinking skills in science along with problem solving procedure development are also included. Laboratory work provides knowledge of common lab tools, skills, and procedures. Three lectures, one 1-hr problem session, and one required lab session per week. Prerequisite: high school Chemistry or permission of the instructor.

110. CHEMISTRY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 110 lecture.

111. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4)

Fundamentals of chemistry, including physical and chemical properties and changes, atoms, molecules and ions, mass relationships in chemical reactions, reactions in aqueous solution, gases and the gas laws, thermochemistry, quantum theory and the electronic structure of atoms, periodic relationships among elements, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and hybridization of atomic orbitals, intermolecular forces in liquids and solids, properties of solutions, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory work provides knowledge of common lab tools, skills, and procedures. Three lectures, one required laboratory, and one 1-hour problem session per week. Prerequisite: High School Chemistry.

111. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 111 lecture.

112. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4)

Continuation of CHEM 111. Topics include chemical equilibrium, acid-base theories, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, chemistry in the atmosphere, entropy and free energy, electrochemistry, the chemistry of metals, nonmetallic elements and their compounds, transition metal chemistry and coordination compounds, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Laboratory work includes the systematic separation and identification of common anions and cations. Three lectures, one required laboratory, and one 1-hour problem sessions per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 111.

112. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 112 lecture.

271. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3)

General principles and theories of organic chemistry. Major topics include: preparation, properties, hybridization, stereochemistry, mechanisms of reactions and uses of aliphatic, halogenated, unsaturated, and alcoholic organic functional groups. Critical thinking skills for solving organic chemistry reactions and syntheses along with problem solving procedure development are also included. Three lectures and one lab session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 112.

271. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 271 lecture.

272. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3)

Continuation of CHEM 271. Major topics include: basic spectroscopic techniques applicable to organic molecules and conjugated systems, reaction mechanisms and uses of aromatic (substituted aromatic), oxygen-containing (ethers, phenols, carbonyls, and heterocyclic), nitrogen-containing (amines, amides, and heterocyclic), carboxylic acids and derivative functional groups. In addition, multistep syntheses along with carbonyl and ester condensation reactions will be covered. Three lectures and one lab session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 271.

272. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 272 lecture.

293. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3)

Elective work in a special field of chemical interest. Prerequisite: Chemistry and Biological Chemistry majors only and permission of the instructor.

331. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (3)

Volumetric, titrametric and gravimetric analysis and an introduction to visible spectroscopic theory and methods. Emphasis is on accuracy of analysis along with the statistical analysis of data. Three lecture hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 112.

331. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS I LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 331 lecture.

332. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)

Introduction to the theory and practice of instrumental methods of chemical analysis. This course will focus on the application of instruments to analyze and separate chemicals. Instruments covered will include high pressure liquid and gas chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Three lecture hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 331.

375. BIOCHEMISTRY (3)

Chemistry related to life processes in plants and animals. Included is a study of protein structure, enzyme kinetics, as well as carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid chemistry. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 271; BIOL 335 recommended.

375. BIOCHEMISTRY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 375 lecture.

377. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3)

Broad range of topics related to the chemistry of the air, soil, and water, including environmental pollution, global warming, alternative energy sources, and the treatment of hazardous wastes. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 375 and MATH 231 or higher.

377. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 377 lecture.

378. ORGANIC CHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND METHODS (1)

Analysis of unknown organic compounds/mixtures and methods for detection. Major topics include: identification, separation, and structural determination or organic molecules and functional groups using classical chemical and spectroscopic instrumental methods. Chemical and spectral interpretation will be problem-oriented using lab experimentation and virtual lab (computer simulated) analyses. One lecture and one problem/lab session per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 271

378. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY ANALYSIS AND METHODS LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 378 lecture.

431. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3)

A study of chemistry including states of matter, the laws and applications of thermodynamics with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and a brief introduction to atomic and molecular structure. This is a calculus based approach to the study of chemistry covering topics like non-ideal gases, the virial equation of state, compressibility, fugacity, Maxwell relations, and simple and complex kinetics. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MATH 231, MATH 232 (recommended), CHEM 111, PHYS 212 or 232 (recommended).

431. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 431 lecture.

432. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3)

The development of modern atomic and molecular theory beginning with introductory quantum mechanics, commutators, expectation values, particle in a box, the hydrogen atom, multi-electron atoms, and an introduction to atomic and molecular spectroscopy. The course will include methods such as the variational method. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MATH 233, CHEM 111, PHYS 232, or permission of the professor.

432. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying CHEM 432 lecture.

435. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

The periodic relationships, preparation, and applications of the elements and their compounds. Investigation of atomic structures in relationship to chemical properties. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Three of the following four courses: CHEM 112, CHEM 272, CHEM 331, and CHEM 431.

445. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

Study of the development and application of chemical theories to organic compounds. Special attention is given to reaction mechanisms. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 272.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1)

Elective work in a special field of chemical interest. Chemistry majors only. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

496. SEMINAR (1)

Integration course for seniors includes reports and discussions of modern developments in the field of chemistry. Chemistry majors only.

498. CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP (1)

Special projects for Chemistry majors. This involves working in some vocation related to chemistry under the supervision of both a facility manager and an academic advisor. Department approval required.

Suggested Program Chemistry Major
First YearSecond Year
CHEM 111, 112 CHEM 271, 272, 378
MATH 231, 232 BIBL 116, Book Study
BIBL 111, 115 MATH 233
ENGL 111 CPSC 101
GSCI 100 Math Upper Division Elective
ENGL 341 Core Curriculum (2 courses)
Core Curriculum (1 course)  
Third YearFourth Year
CHEM 331, 332 CHEM 431, 432, 496
PHYS 231, 232 CHEM 375, 377, 435, or 445
MATH 210 Core Curriculum (3 courses)

ICST 350

 Other/upper division electives (2 courses)

Core Curriculum (2 courses)

 

*MATH 231 and 232 are deferred until the second year if students need MATH 129.

Chemistry Education

The Chemistry Education program represents a partnership between the Department of Natural and Applied Sciences and the Education Department to provide a comprehensive major to prepare chemistry students for a career in secondary education. 

All chemistry education majors must complete the required courses courses as listed under Department of Education, Secondary Education. Chemistry education majors must complete a) the Science Core Requirements and then b) the subject certification courses.

a) Science Core Requirements (46)

CHEM 111      General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 112      General Chemistry II (5)
CHEM 271      Organic Chemistry I (4)
CHEM 272      Organic Chemistry II (4)
CHEM 278      Organic Chemical Analysis and Methods (2)
CHEM 375      Biochemistry (4)
CHEM 377      Environmental Chemistry (4)
PHYS 211       General Physics (5) or PHYS 231 (5) Engineering Physics
GSCI 123       History and Philosophy of Science (3)
MATH 231      Calculus I (4)

b) Additional Subject Certification Track Requirements (8)

BIOL 200        Biological Sciences (4)
GSCI 111       Geology (w/lab) (4) or GSCI 112 Meteorology (w/lab) (4)

Students majoring in Chemistry Education must meet all General Education and Department of Education, Secondary Education course requirements.

Computer Information Systems

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) program prepares students to enter a career as an Information Systems (IS) professional. IS professionals work with information technology and must have a sound knowledge of computers, communications, and software. Because they operate within organizations and with organizational systems, they must also understand the concepts and processes for achieving organizational goals with information technology. The CIS degree program, therefore, covers information technology, information systems management, information systems development and implementation, organizational functions, and concepts/processes of organizational management. Although several courses are common to both the Computer Science (CPSC) and CIS programs, the CIS program provides the background to allow graduates to use their technical knowledge and abilities within the framework of a business environment.

The CIS major includes 44 credits of work as follows: CIS 101 (or proficiency), 111, 311, 325, 441 (15 credits), CPSC 111, 141, 211, 225 (12 credits), COEM 175 and COMD 355, (5 credits), MGMT 235, 341, 349 (9 credits), and BUED 275 (3 credits). In addition, the CIS major must take COMM 113 as their Humanities General Education requirement and MGMT or MATH 210 as their mathematics General Education requirement.

A CIS minor requires 21 credits of work as follows: CIS 101 (or proficiency), 111, 311, 325, 441 (15 credits), and CPSC 111, 211 (6 credits).  This list will be modified for Computer Science (CPSC) majors.

Computer Information Systems Courses (CIS)

101. INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL COMPUTERS (3)

(Cross-listed with CPSC 101) Survey of personal computers and applications. Introduction to general computer concepts and terminology with emphasis on using the personal computer as a tool for knowledge workers. Popular software applications examined include word processing, data management, electronic spreadsheets, and computer graphics.

111. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

The role of information systems within an organization or enterprise. Topics include information technologies and utilization of those technologies in a competitive environment. Managerial and security/ethical issues. Various case studies are examined.

311. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

(Cross-listed with CPSC 311) Techniques of problem definition, determination of system requirements, and design of computer applications. Emphasis on the development life cycle, cost determination, data requirements, and systems documentations. Various case studies are examined. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

314. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

This course examines the development and use of management and computer information systems supporting the vision and operation of organizations. An emphasis is placed on general knowledge of various information systems, with specific focus on information knowledge management, system development and evaluation, emerging trends, organizational communication, and the use of information systems.

325. DATA COMMUNICATIONS (3)

(Cross-listed with CPSC 325) Data communications, including directly-connected devices, local and wide area networks, communication protocols/standards, and network security. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

441. DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

(Cross-listed with CPSC 441) Database concepts, database design, data models, query language facilities, and data protection considerations and methodologies. Emphasis on the relational database model, but includes other database models (e.g., object-oriented, etc.)

Suggested Program Computer Information Systems Major

First YearCreditsSecond YearCredits
CIS 101 (or prof), 111         6 CPSC 141, 225      6
CPSC 111, 211      6 MGMT/MATH 210, MGMT 235      6
University Seminar         1 BIBL 116      3
BIBL 111, 115      6 SSCI 220, HUMN 230 (or subs)      6
COMM 205      3 Social Science      3
COMM 113      3 COEM 175      2
PSYC 138 (or substitute)      3 Minor Requirements      6
FIN 138      3 Total     32
Total     31      
Third YearCreditsFourth YearCredits
CIS 311, 325      6 CIS 441      3
COMD 355      3 MGMT 341      3
MGMT 349      3 ICST 350      3
BUED 275      3 BIBL Book Study      3
Natural Science    3-4 Natural Science    3-4
HUMN 240,THEO 320 (or subs)       6 Minor Requirements      6-9
Minor Requirements          6  Electives      9
Total   30-31 Total   30-34

Computer Science

Computer Science studies the representation, storage, and transformation of data into useful information using electronic computing machines. It affects practically all aspects of contemporary life. The main objects of study are digital computers and the phenomena surrounding them. Work in the discipline is focused on the structure and operation of computer systems, the principles that underlie their design and programming, effective methods for their use in different classes of information processing tasks, and theoretical characterizations of their properties and limitations. Although the field of computer science is relatively young, it is a fast-growing, rewarding discipline. The Computer Science program at EU provides the basic fundamentals of the field in preparing students for immediate entry into the computer industry or for continued study at the graduate level.

A Computer Science major is required to take 33 credits in computer science: CPSC 111, 211, 215, 225, 231, 311, 415, 441, and 493, a second high order language, and one upper division (300 or 400 level) CPSC elective. The major also requires BUED 275 and MATH 212. Students (especially those who plan to do post-graduate study) are also advised to take MATH 231, 232, and 331.

A Computer Science minor requires 21 credits in computer science consisting of CPSC 111, 211, 215, 225, 231, a second high order language, and one upper division (300 or 400 level) CPSC course.

Computer Science Courses (CPSC)

101. INTRODUCTION TO PERSONAL COMPUTERS (3)

(Cross-listed with CIS 101) Survey of personal computers and applications. Introduces general computer concepts and terminology with emphasis on using the personal computer as a tool for knowledge workers. Popular software applications examined include word processing, data management, electronic spreadsheets, and computer graphics.

111. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (3)

Introduction to the field of computer science, including computer architecture and ethics. Emphasizes the logical operations of a digital computer, problem-solving techniques, development of algorithms, design techniques, and structured programming concepts. Topics are taught using the high order language, C++. Proper program design, coding disciplines, documentation, debugging, and testing techniques are also discussed.

141. VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING (3)

Introduction to object oriented programming in Windows using Visual Basic. Provides an event-driven programming environment in which students develop graphical user interfaces for practical applications.

211. DATA STRUCTURES (3)

Continuation of CPSC 111 with additional and more complex data structures defined at the abstract, application, and implementation levels. Topics include basic concepts of data representation, linear lists, strings, arrays, linked lists, and tree structures. Also includes the study of the algorithms developed in support of these data structures and for searching and sorting. Object oriented programming is done using the C++ language. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CPSC 111.

215. ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING (3)

Introduction to the internal operation of a computer's machine language. Topics include computer architecture, data representation, storage definition, assembler concepts, and instruction formats in an assembler language. Prerequisite: CPSC 211.

225. COMPUTER HARDWARE ORGANIZATION (3)

Introduction to the organization and structure of the major hardware components in a computer system. Topics include the mechanics of information transfer and control, the fundamentals of logic design, the mechanics and structure of I/O devices, the processor, and main memory. Conceptual machines (deterministic and nondeterministic finite state machines, Turning Machines, etc.) are also examined. Prerequisites: CPCS 211 and MATH 212.

231. INTRODUCTION TO FILE PROCESSING (3)

Introduction to the concepts and techniques of structuring data on auxiliary storage devices. Common file organizations such as sequential, relative, and indexed. Topics include external sort-merges, hashing, indexing, and various search tree manipulations. The physical characteristics of auxiliary storage devices are also examined. Prerequisite: CPSC 211.

248. SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Topics selected from specialized areas of computer science not otherwise offered. Topics include material not deemed to be advanced enough to warrant upper division status. The student's transcript will show the specific topic covered. A maximum of 9 credits of special topics is allowed.

290. INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH (1-3)

Independent study in computer science under the direction of a faculty member. Topics are selected from recent developments in computer science and include material not deemed to be advanced enough to warrant upper division status. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

311. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

(Cross-listed with CIS 311) Techniques of problem definition, determination of system requirements, and design of computer applications. Emphasis on the development life cycle, cost determination, data requirements, and systems documentation. Various case studies are examined. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

325. DATA COMMUNICATIONS (3)

(Cross-listed with CIS 325) Data communications, including directly-connected devices, local and wide area networks, communication protocols/standards, and network security. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

415. OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)

Overview of operating systems including operating system concepts, characteristics, and design considerations. Topics include concurrent processes, coordination of asynchronous events, file systems, resource sharing, memory management, scheduling, and deadlock problems. Prerequisite: CPSC 225, 211.

435. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3)

Introduction to the field of artificial intelligence (AI), a field of computer science concerned with the computational understanding of intelligent behavior along with the machines/computer programs that exhibit such behavior. Topics include the characteristics of typical AI problems and solutions, knowledge representation, defining a problem as a state space search, and heuristic search techniques. Prerequisites: CPSC 211 and MATH 212.

441. DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

(Cross-listed with CIS 441) Data base concepts, data base design, data models, query language facilities, and data protection considerations and methodologies. Emphasis on the relational data model, but other database models are examined (e.g., object-oriented, etc.).

448. SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Topics selected from specialized areas of computer science not otherwise offered. Topics include material deemed to be advanced enough to warrant upper division status. The Student's transcript will show the specific topic covered. A maximum of 9 credits of special topics is allowed.

490. INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH (1-3)

Independent study in computer science under the direction of a faculty member. Topics are selected from recent developments in computer science and include material deemed to be advanced enough to warrant upper division status. Prerequisite: Computer Science majors and consent of Instructor.

493. SENIOR PROJECT (3)

The independent development and implementation of a special project chosen by the student (subject to Instructor approval). Designed to have the student incorporate skills developed through prior courses. Prerequisite: Computer Science major with a minimum of 21 credits of computer science completed.

497. INTERNSHIP (3)

Supervised field experience in computer science contributing to student's professional development. Prior approval must be obtained before internship arrangements are completed. Prerequisites: Computer Science major and consent of a computer science faculty member.

 Suggested Program Computer Science Major
First YearCreditsSecond YearCredits
CPSC 111, 211      6 CPSC 215, 225, 231      9
MATH 212      3 A second high order language      3
University Seminar      1 MATH 210      3
BIBL 111, 115      6 BIBL 116      3
COMM 205      3 Reading & Imagination elective      3
FIN 138                  3 Natural Science    3-4
PSYC 138 (or substitute)      3 Minor Requirements      6
Historical Inquiry elective      3        
Humanities      3       
Total     31 Total   30-31
       
Third YearCreditsFourth YearCredits
CPSC 311, 415, 441      9 CPSC elective (300-400 level)      3
BIBL Book Study      3 CPSC 493      3
Artistic Expression elective      3 THEO 320 (or substitute)      3
BUED 275      3 ICST 350      3
Minor Requirements      6 Natural Science    3-4
MATH 231, 232      8 Minor Requirement/Electives      9-12
Total     32 MATH 331       3
    Total   27-31

Applied Science and Sustainability

The Applied Science and Sustainability program is designed for students who wish to prepare for graduate school or professional work in areas relating to the environment, conservation, or field research. Students in this program experience a wide array of classes in the life and physical sciences, as well as numerous field and laboratory opportunities.

The Applied Science and Sustainability major provides students with a marketable 4-year degree for non-medically related professions. Also, students are prepared to attend graduate school in areas relating to the environment, conservation, or field research.

The Applied Science and Sustainability major consists of 56 credits distributed as follows: BIOL 200, 201, and 202; CHEM 111, 112, and 271; CPSC 101; MATH 231 or 129; GSCI 111 or 112; PHYS 211; and ENVR 342, 343, 377, and 496.

The Applied Science and Sustainability minor consists of 20 credit hours in Biological/Environmental Science and must include BIOL 200, ENVR 343, and ENVR 377.

Applied Science and Sustainability courses

293. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1)

Elective work in a field of environmental science interest. Departmental approval required.

298. INTERNSHIP (1)

Special projects for Applied Science and Sustainability majors. This involves working in a vocation related to the environmental sciences under the supervision of both a facility manager and an academic advisor. Departmental approval required.

342. ECOLOGY (3)

Basic ecological theories and practice. Field trips are required. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 202. Offered alternate fall semesters.

342. ECOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying ENVR 342 lecture.

343. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (3)

The influence of environmental factors including geology, climate, water, wastes, and political factors on plants, animals, and microbes and their interactions. Conservation/utilization, population growth and sustainability of resources, and ethics. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: one course in biology. Offered alternate fall semesters.

343. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying ENVR 343 lecture.

377. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3)

Broad range of topics related to the chemistry of the air, soil, and water, including environmental pollution, global warming, alternative energy sources, and the treatment of hazardous wastes. Three lecture hours and one 3-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 271 and MATH 129 or higher.

377. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying ENVR 377 lecture.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1)

Research in a field of environmental science interest. By permission only and junior or senior standing.

496. SENIOR SEMINAR (1-2)

Further development of scientific research and writing skills. Includes at least one formal paper and a formal oral presentation. Required for Applied Science and Sustainability majors. Prerequisite: ENVR 296 and senior standing. Offered spring semester.

498. INTERNSHIP (1)

Special projects for Applied Science and Sustainability majors involving work in a vocation related to the environmental sciences under the supervision of both the facility manager and an academic advisor. Departmental approval required.

Suggested Program

Applied Science and Sustainability Major

First YearSecond Year
BIOL 200, 201 BIOL 202
CHEM 111, 112 CHEM 271, ENVR 377
BIBL 111, 115 BIBL 116, 3xx
MATH 231 or MATH 129 MATH 210
Composition Proficiency ENGL 341
Computer Proficiency Core Curriculum
Core Curriculum  
Third YearFourth Year
ENVR 342 ENVR 343, 496
PHYS 211 Core Curriculum
GSCI 111  

Core Curriculum

 

Forensic Science

The Forensic Science minor is designed to introduce the student to various aspects of criminal cases, using methods from the natural and behavioral sciences to accumulate evidence used in criminal investigations. Forensic science requires coursework in the natural and behavioral sciences: biology, chemistry, criminal justice, and psychology. 

Forensic Science Minor

Required Courses

Credits

BIOL 101 Biological Science
(OR BIOL 124, 211, or 311)

4 cr
CHEM 110 Chemistry for Health Sciences 4 cr
CJST 241 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 cr
CJST 422 Criminal Investigation 3 cr
*PSYC 434 Psychological Testing
    *PSYC 112 is a pre-requisite
3 cr

ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose one):

 3-4 cr

BIOL 335 Microbiology for the Health Sciences;
CHEM 110 Chemistry for Health Sciences;
CJST 241 Introduction to Criminal Justice;
CJST 422 Criminal Investigation;
PSYC 434 Psychological Testing

 
 TOTAL:    20 Credits

General Science

The Department of Natural and Applied Sciences offers General Science courses that fulfill the General Education requirements of students majoring in areas other than science or mathematics. A General Science minor requires a total of 20 hours, including BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or 202, CHEM 111, PHYS 211 or 231, and one of GSCI 111, 112 or 115.

General Science Courses (GSCI)

100. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR (1)

This introductory course helps new Evangel students acclimatize themselves to the University. As such, it serves as an intellectual and practical orientation to the challenges and opportunities of University life and learning. Students are introduced to Evangelís Christ-centered, integrational, exploratory, and global ethos. They learn to use and participate in campus-wide and department-specific offerings. They build relationships within departmental contexts as well as across campus. They are encouraged to understand that they are being prepared not only for a career but for life.

111. GEOLOGY (3)

Introduction to the physical science behind the processes and materials involved in the creation of the earth's crust and its soil. Topics include minerals, rock types, weathering, erosion, soil characterization, pedoturbation, mapping, hornization, and soil classification. Three lecture hours (3 credits) or three lecture hours with 2 hours of lab per week (4 credits).

111. GEOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying GSCI 111 lecture.

112. METEOROLOGY (3)

Introduction to the physical processes governing weather events and the resulting pattern of climates developed over the earth's surface. Topics include atmospheric composition, temperature, pressure, humidity, wind, radiation processes, clouds, condensation and precipitation, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric stability, circulation systems, air masses and fronts, hurricanes, thunderstorms, flash floods, hail, lightning, tornadoes, El Nino, global warming, climate classification, climate change, and seasons of the year. Three lectures hours (3 credits) or three lecture hours with 2 hours of lab per week (4 credits).

112. METEOROLOGY LAB (1)

Laboratory course accompanying GSCI 112 lecture.

115. PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3)

Study of motion and energy, the basic ideas of electricity, the phenomena of light and radiation, elementary thermodynamics, and the structure of matter in terms of atoms and molecules and their nature. Three lecture hours (3 credits) or three lecture hours with 2 hours of lab per week (4 credits).

115. PHYSICAL SCIENCE LABORATORY (1)

Laboratory course accompanying GSCI 115 lecture.

230. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3)

Study of the history and philosophy of science and their effects on the actual practice of science today. Intended to provide an understanding of the logic and operation of science. Required by the State of Missouri for secondary science teacher certification and can be used to fulfill 3 credits of the 6-credit natural science requirement for the B.S. degree. (Cross-listed as PHIL 230.)

293. SPECIAL TOPICS (1)

Elective work in a field of General Science.

298. INTERNSHIP (1)

Offered on demand.

313. ASTRONOMY (3)

For the non-Science major from a non-mathematical perspective. Introduction to our modern view of the universe, its contents, and its development. Topics include stars, galaxies, quasars, black holes, light, optics, and the electromagnetic spectrum.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SCIENCE (1)

Methods of teaching science in secondary schools. Prerequisites: Science major and admission to Teacher Education Program.

448. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)

Topics selected from specialized areas of science not otherwise offered. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Offered on demand.

Health Care - Nursing

For more information about our nursing program visit: http://www.evangel.edu/Academics/ScienceandTechnology/Professional/Nursing.asp

Evangel’s Nursing Program is a cooperative effort with Cox College. Participants earn two Bachelor’s degrees: a B.S. in Health Care from Evangel and a B.S.N. from Cox. This is an all-inclusive, fully-accredited, 4-year program. As EU students, they live on campus and participate in Evangel student life. Students complete nursing prerequisite courses and nearly all Core Curriculum requirements during the first three semesters.  During the last five semesters, students take courses in nursing theory and clinical work at Cox, using the clinical facilities of the Cox Health Systems network. When they complete the program, students are eligible to take the NCLEX exam which qualifies them for licensure as Registered Nurses.

Entry into the Cox College nursing program is competitive. Applicants need to meet particular academic standards in their 37 semester credits of prerequisite courses (no grades lower than C and minimum GPA of 2.75) and meet the Math Proficiency requirements (see the Cox College of Nursing and Health Sciences Catalog under Math Proficiency).

The Bachelor’s degree with a major in Health Care requires the completion of all nursing course work (approximately 67 credits) as determined by Cox College or another accredited college of nursing for completion of the B.S.N. degree. It also requires the following 19 credits from the Evangel Department of Natural and Applied Sciences: BIOL 211 (4),  BIOL 212 (4), BIOL 235 (4), BIOL 360 (3), and CHEM 110 (4). In addition, the EU Core Curriculum requirements must be met. This constitutes a comprehensive major.

A Health Care minor includes 22 credits as listed (or similar but more rigorous coursework in the same area of study). These courses include BIOL 123 (3), BIOL 211 (4), BIOL 212 (4), BIOL 235 (4), BIOL 360 (3), and CHEM 110 (4).

Suggested Program Health Care Major

First YearSecond Year
BIBL 111 & BIBL 115

PSYC 237

BIOL 211 & BIOL 212 ENGL 205
BIOL 235 SOCI 111
CHEM 110 BIOL 360
ENGL 111 MATH 210 
GSCI 100 BIBL 116 
NRSI 200 FIN 138 
GOVT 170 Core Curriculum courses
PSYC 112 NRSI courses (15 credits) 
PHIL 115  
MATH 124 (if needed)  
   
Third YearFourth Year
NRSI courses (25 credits) NRSI courses (25 credits)
BIBL 3XX ICST 350
THEO 320  

Associates Degree in Pre-Nursing

A 2-year Associate of Arts degree in pre-nursing is available for students wishing to complete a nursing degree at another school. See the Associate of Arts Program section of this catalog for a description of the A.A. degree. Also, see the Health Care portion of the Department of Natural and Applied Sciences section of this catalog for a further description of the 4-year B.S.N. nursing program.

The pre-nursing A.A. program provides an opportunity to complete the usual nursing General Education requirements in the distinctive environment of a private Christian university. This program offers enough flexibility for a student to meet the specific requirements of most nursing schools.

Suggested Program Associate of Arts in Pre-Nursing

First Year including summer sessions

Second Year

BIOL 123, 211, 212, 235 CPSC 101
CHEM 110 GOVT 170
PSYC 112 BIOL 360
BIBL 111, 115, 116 PHIL 115
ENGL 111 PSYC 237
MATH 210 SOCI 111
ENGL 205 NRSI 200
GSCI 100 COMM 246

Mathematics and Applied Mathematics

The Mathematics curriculum provides a broad knowledge of mathematics to meet the needs of students desiring to 1) teach mathematics, 2) prepare for graduate study in mathematics, 3) work as professional mathematicians, 4) prepare to use mathematics in other majors, and/or 5) develop an appreciation for mathematics.

The Applied mathematics curriculum provides the application of mathematics to a joint area of interest that prepares a student for a career or graduate study in applied mathematics or the associated discipline. Applied Mathematics degrees are offered in conjunction with Biology, Chemistry, or Physics. The core of the Applied Mathematics program combines a concentration in applied mathematics with a concentration in the associated discipline. See the appropriate sections of the catalog to determine the concentration requirements of the associated discipline.

A Mathematics major requires 33 credits of mathematics including MATH 231, 232, 233, and 496, and 14 additional upper-division (300 or 400 level) credits in mathematics. CPSC 111 and PHYS 231 or CHEM 111 are also required. A Mathematics concentration consists of 24 credit hours and must include MATH 232. An Applied Mathematics concentration consists of 24 credit hours and must include Math 231, Math 232, Math 233, Math 431, Math 210, and two more courses chosen from Math 310, Math 331, and Math 432.

 A Mathematics minor consists of 18 semester credits and must include MATH 232.

Only 200-level courses or higher count toward the major, concentration, and minor.

Mathematics Education majors take MATH 210, 212, 231, 232, 233, 331, 334, 336, 343, 490, 496; two courses selected from MATH 310, 431, 432, and 442 (for students with a minor only one course is selected); CPSC 111; PHYS 231 or CHEM 111; and one course in biology.

Students interested in the middle school concentration in Mathematics should refer to the appropriate portions of the Department of Education section of the catalog.

Mathematics and Applied Mathematics Courses (MATH)

120. MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS I (2)

For Elementary Education majors. Does not meet Mathematics Proficiency for non-teaching majors. Study of space, planes, and lines with their corresponding figures as sets of points, the beginning of deductive theory, the concepts of measurement and of coordinate geometry, and an introduction to basic statistical concepts.

121. MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS II (3)

For Elementary Education majors. Does not meet Mathematics Proficiency for non-teaching majors. Study of the structure of the real number system with an emphasis on the basic concepts and algorithms of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Includes problem solving, elementary set theory, and number theory.

124. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (3)

Further investigation of topics covered in a first course, such as properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, and functional relationships. Additional topics may include exponential and logarithmic functions as well as sequences and series. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent.

129. COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY (3)

A study of the development of the real number system; algebraic operations; inequalities; linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions and their zeroes; inverse functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; complex numbers; and trigonometry. Prerequisite: Two years high school algebra or equivalent.

210. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)

Descriptive statistics including univariate, bivariate, and multivariate data; binomial and normal probability distributions; and confidence intervals, parametric, and non-parametric hypothesis tests. Uses a statistical software package such as SPSS. Satisfies mathematics proficiency requirements.

212. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (3)

Mathematical concepts common to computer science and related fields. Topics include logic, set theory, matrices, linear programming, counting, probability, relations, graph theory, and Boolean algebra.

231. CALCULUS I (4)

Introduction to the concepts of calculus, including coordinate systems, curve analysis, derivatives and differentials, time-related changes, maxima and minima, integration, and related topics.

232. CALCULUS II (4)

A continuation of Math 231 to include: Trigonometric, exponential, and inverse functions; techniques of integration; indeterminate forms; and infinite series.

233. CALCULUS III (4)

A continuation of Math 232 to include: Rectilinear and curvilinear motion, parametric equations, polar coordinates, improper integrals, partial differentiation, and multiple integrals.

310. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL INFERENCE (3)

Descriptive statistics, probability modeling, random variables, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: MATH 232 and MATH 210.

331. LINEAR ALGEBRA (3)

Vectors, vector spaces, determinants, matrices, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, and related topics. Prerequisite: MATH 232.

334. FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY (1-3)

Geometry from the modern axiomatic viewpoint. Elementary logic with attention to methods of proof and axiomatic systems. Euclidean geometry, the essential content of the course, is developed from selected sets of postulates. Prerequisite: MATH 232.

336. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN MATHEMATICS (1)

Fundamentals of teaching mathematics in high school. Designed for Mathematics Education majors only. Not applicable to the Mathematics major, concentration, or minor.

343. ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES (3)

Theory of groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and related topics. Prerequisite: MATH 232.

353. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (3)

Provides a knowledge of materials and methods of teaching mathematics in the middle school.

431. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3)

Equations of the first, second, and higher order; linear equations with constant coefficients and systems of equations; the Laplace Transform, power series, and other standard methods of solution; introduction to difference and partial differential equations; and applications to physics and engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 233.

432. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3)

Polynomial approximations, finite differences, numerical differentiation and integration, methods of least squares, and numerical solutions of differential equations. Prerequisites: CPSC 111, MATH 233, or permission of professor.

442. ADVANCED CALCULUS (3)

Selected topics in advanced calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 233.

448. SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Topics selected from the areas of analysis, algebra, geometry, topology, logic, and statistics, according to student needs and instructor's specialization. Prerequisite: Permission of the professor. Transcript will show specific topic covered. Maximum credit allowed under Special Topics is 9 credits.

490. READINGS IN MATHEMATICS (1-2)

Directed readings in history and philosophy of mathematics. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Mathematics Education majors only.

493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3)

Elective work in a special field of mathematical interest. Prerequisite: Mathematics major with upper division standing and permission of department head and professor.

496. MATHEMATICS SEMINAR (1)

Class and individual study of advanced topics in mathematics, both pure and applied. Required of all seniors majoring in Mathematics.

Suggested Program Mathematics Major

First YearCreditsSecond YearCredits
MATH 231, 232      8 MATH 233      4
MATH 210 or 212      3 MATH 210 or 212      3
CPSC 111      3 Upper-division Math      3
ENGL 111      3 CHEM 111 or PHYS 231      5
Biblical Studies      6 Biblical Studies      6
Electives      8 Electives     10
Total:     31 Total     31
       
Third YearCreditsFourth YearCredits
Upper-division Math      6 Upper-division Math      6
Biblical Studies      3 MATH 496      1
Electives     22 Biblical Studies                        3
    Electives     21
Total        31 Total     31

Nursing (See Health Care)

Physical Science

A Physical Science minor of 20 credits may be earned by taking CHEM 111-112 and PHYS 211-212 or 231-232.

Physics

A Physics concentration of 24 credits and Physics minor of 18 credits are offered. Both programs must include PHYS 231-232. Additional credits may be selected from PHYS 245 (Circuit Analysis), PHYS 342 (Thermodynamics), PHYS 351 (Statics), PHYS 352 (Dynamics), PHYS 411 (Modern Physics), PHYS 412 (Electromagnetism), PHYS 448 (Special Topics), and PHYS 493 (Special Problems). These courses form the basis of an Engineering or Physics degree which can be completed at another institution.

Physics Courses (PHYS)

211. GENERAL PHYSICS (4)

College-level physics, including the fundamental principles of mechanics, thermal properties of matter, electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics based on a knowledge of college-level algebra and trigonometry. Designed for majors who do not need calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 125 and 129.

211. GENERAL PHYSICS LAB (1)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 211 lecture.

212. GENERAL PHYSICS (4)

A continuation of PHYS 211. College-level physics including the fundamental principles of mechanics, thermal properties of matter, electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics based on a knowledge of college-level algebra and trigonometry. Designed for majors who do not need calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 125 and 129.

212. GENERAL PHYSICS LAB (1)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 212 lecture.

231. ENGINEERING PHYSICS (4)

Fundamental theories and principles in classical physics of mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and optics with an introduction in modern physics based on the knowledge of calculus and vector manipulations. Designed for physics and pre-engineering students and majors requesting calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and 232 (or taken concurrently).

231. ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB (1)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 231 lecture.

232. ENGINEERING PHYSICS (4)

A continuation of PHYS 231. Fundamental theories and principles in classical physics of mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and optics with an introduction in modern physics based on a knowledge of calculus and vector manipulations. Designed for physics and pre-engineering students and majors requesting calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and 232 (or taken concurrently).

232. ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB (1)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 232 lecture.

245. CIRCUIT ANALYSIS (3)

Instruction in AC and DC circuit components; energy and power; series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits; source conversions and Thevenin, Norton equivalency; mesh and nodal analysis; RLC circuits and frequency response. Prerequisites/corequisites: MATH 232 and PHYS 232.

342. THERMODYNAMICS (3)

Fundamental course leading to advanced work in physics, theoretical chemistry, or engineering. Includes heat theory, states of matter, and laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and PHYS 232.

351. STATICS (3)

Fundamentals of statics, vector analysis of forces and moments in two- and three-dimensions, free-body diagrams, static equilibrium, moments of inertia, centroids, shearing forces, and bending moments. Introductory topics in dynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 233 and PHYS 231.

352. DYNAMICS (3)

An introduction to the study of dynamic systems. Topics include: motion of a particle; motion of a rigid body; relative motion; kinetics of translation, and plane motion; work energy methods; impulse/momentum methods; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: MATH 233, PHYS 231 and PHYS 351.

411. MODERN PHYSICS (3)

Physics of atomic particles, including the classical theory and the development of the major modern viewpoints. Prerequisites: MATH 232 and PHYS 232.

412. ELECTROMAGNETISM (3)

Calculus and vector approach to electricity and magnetism, covering electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic theory, and electromagnetic waves through Maxwell equation. Prerequisites: MATH 232 and PHYS 232.

248/448. SPECIAL TOPIC (1-3)

Topics selected from specialized areas of engineering or physics according to student needs and instructor's specialization.

293/493. SPECIAL PROBLEMS (1-3)

Independent study or elective work in physics or pre-engineering under the direction of a physics or pre-engineering faculty member.

296/496. PHYSICS SEMINAR (1)

Offered on demand.

Pre-Engineering

Evangel University offers an Associate of Arts degree in Pre-engineering as well as a Dual Degree program with any accredited engineering school. The Associate of Arts degree is described elsewhere in this catalog, but the suggested program is given below. After completing the A.A. degree, the student may then transfer to a school of engineering. A student should be qualified to enter the third year of studies in most engineering programs upon completion of the program below:

Suggested Program Associates Of Arts In Pre-Engineering

First YearCreditsSecond YearCredits
BIBL 111, 115    6 BIBL 116   3
CHEM 111, 112   10 MATH 233   4
CPSC 111    3 MATH 431   3
MATH 210    3 PHYS 231, 232  10
MATH 231, 232    8 ENGL 111   3
GSCI 100    1 SOCI 111   3
      Art, Music, or Theatre   2
    GOVT 170   3
Total 31 Total  31

Dual Degree Programs In Engineering

Evangel University offers a dual degree program whereby a student completes at least 82 credits at Evangel and then graduates from an ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited engineering school. Upon graduation from the engineering school, the student is awarded two diplomas: a Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics from Evangel and an Engineering degree from the second institution. In this program, students are able to enjoy the benefits and enrichment of both a liberal arts and a professional engineering education, which make them uniquely prepared for a variety of challenging and rewarding career options. Engineering possibilities are limited only by one's choice of the cooperating institution.

This program is flexible and can be adjusted to meet the transfer requirements of most engineering schools.

Suggested Dual Degree Program in Engineering

First Year   Credits Second YearCredits Fifth SemesterCredits
BIBL 111, 115      6   Pre-Eng Elective      3   HUMN elective      3
MATH 210, 231, 232     11   MATH 233, 431      7   SSCI elective      3
GSCI 100      1   PHYS elective      3   PHYS elective      6
CPSC 111      3   BIBL 116      3   BIBL elective 3

CHEM 111

     5  

PHYS 231, 232

    10         
FIN, PSYC or SOCI      3  

Gen Ed

     9      
ENGL 111      3  

 

          
Total:     32   Total:     35   Total:     15

Pre-Med, Pre-PA, Pre-PT, Predental, Pre-Vet,

Pre-Optometry, Pre-OT, Pre-Chiropractic

Evangel University has excellent academic programs for students who wish to pursue careers in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, or other health-related fields. A 4-year liberal arts degree usually is required for admission to medical or other professional schools. Evangel’s General Education courses, along with a major in Biology, Biological Chemistry or Chemistry, meet the requirements for nearly all medical and other professional schools and allow for many career options. Although pre-medical/pre-professional students are free to select almost any major, Biology, Biological Chemistry and Chemistry are highly recommended and most commonly chosen. Strong competition exists for admission to medical/professional schools, so it is important for a student to obtain proper advising and be well acquainted with the prerequisites and the application process. Students should attain a minimum 3.0 GPA by the end of the 2nd year (4th semester) to continue as a pre-professional student.

Pre-Pharmacy

The Pre-pharmacy student usually majors in Biological Chemistry. After completing the undergraduate degree, he or she applies to a school that offers the Doctor of Pharmacy degree (Pharm.D.). Although some variation exists among Pharm.D. programs, the following list of undergraduate college prerequisites represents the requirements of most schools:

English Composition   6
United States Government or History   3
Behavioral Sciences   3
Calculus   4
Biology/Zoology   8
Microbiology   4
Cell Biology   3
General Chemistry  10
Organic Chemistry  10
Quantitative Analysis or Physical Chemistry   4
Biochemistry   4
General Physics  10
Anatomy and Physiology  8

Many Colleges of Pharmacy also recommend an economics and a computer science course. Because different pharmacy programs have varying admissions requirements, students should work with advisors to determine the requirements of the schools in which they are interested.