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Graduate Studies Catalog 2018-2019

General and Accreditation Information

Evangel University is a coeducational university—a Christian, learning-centered community of faith that confers Baccalaureate and Master’s degrees. The Evangel Ethos is Christ-centered, integrational, global, and exploratory. Evangel is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National Association of Schools of Music, and the Council on Social Work Education. The Missouri State Department of Education recognizes Evangel graduates who have completed the teacher education and school counseling programs by issuing state certificates. Evangel also has an endorsement from its parent denomination through the Alliance for Assemblies of God Higher Education. The Evangel campus is located in Springfield, Missouri, a medium-sized city with ample employment opportunities, affordable cost of living, and strong community values. Located in the heart of Ozark Mountain country, Springfield is surrounded by scenic lakes and hills, shopping, restaurants and hotels. Local attractions include Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, Wonders of Wildlife Museum, Silver Dollar City and Branson entertainment. St. Louis and Kansas City are major cities within a three-hour drive.

Mission

We meet studentss where they are, empowering them to achieve their goals through excellent, innovative degree programs and services that connect faith and learning.

Philosophy

The central belief that Christ is Lord is the defining foundation of Graduate Studies at Evangel University. This belief informs and guides the learner in the pursuit of knowledge, faith and responsibility.

Evangel University Community Life Statement

“Christ is Lord” is the essence of Evangel University. We seek to be a community in which each member actively participates and where there is a sense of belonging, mutual respect, and caring. In such an atmosphere, members can fully develop into the person God wants them to be. Our goal is to integrate Biblical truth with every area of life, submitting ourselves to Christ and allowing the Holy Spirit to direct and control us. Accordingly, while on campus, during an off-campus class, or at any Evangel University function, students, faculty, staff, and administrators are expected to:

  • Respect God, others and self at all times
  • Abide by the life-style standards of Evangel University as outlined in the catalog Seriously pursue academic and spiritual growth through diligent, disciplined behaviors Exercise financial responsibility
  • Maintain positive health habits by abstaining from alcohol, tobacco, and abusive drugs
  • Dress so that a professional learning environment is maintained
  • Refrain from vulgar, obscene, or suggestive language

Organization

The Graduate Studies Council formulates policies for the graduate programs of Evangel University. The Council is composed of the Director of Graduate Studies, Chairs and Departmental Graduate Coordinators approved by the council and that are also faculty representatives of departments offering graduate programs, and two faculty members elected by the Graduate Council. The Vice President for Academic Affairs is an ex officio member of the Council.

Faculty

Evangel University’s graduate faculty set standards for graduate work and provide graduate instruction. Graduate faculty generally hold an earned doctorate or its equivalent and are approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the Graduate Program Coordinator. Only members of the graduate faculty may teach courses numbered 500-700 and/or may serve on the Graduate Studies Council. Adjunct graduate faculty may be approved to provide instructional services for graduate students because of their unique competencies and/or professional roles or achievements.

Advisors

When a student is accepted into a graduate program, the Program Coordinator will appoint a graduate faculty member as the student’s Academic Advisor. The faculty member, the student, and the Director of Graduate Studies will be notified of the appointment. In all graduate matters, the assigned advisor will be the student’s first point of contact.

Nondiscrimination Policy

Evangel University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, age, or handicap in its educational programs, admissions, activities, or employment practices.

Accommodation Statement

This university abides by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which stipulates that no student shall be denied the benefits of an education “solely by reason of a handicap.” Disabilities covered by law include, but are not limited to, learning disabilities and hearing, sight or mobility impairments. If you have a disability that may have some impact on your work and for which you may require accommodations, please see the staff in the Academic Support Center, Zimmerman Hall, Suite 218, so that such accommodations may be arranged.

Degrees

Evangel University grants eight graduate degrees:

  • Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction Leadership
  • Master of Education in Educational Leadership
  • Master of Education in Literacy
  • Master of Organizational Leadership
  • Master of Science in Athletic Training
  • Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
  • Master of Science in School Counseling
  • Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction

General admission and degree requirements for Graduate Studies are determined by the Graduate Studies Council, the Board of Administration, and the Board of Directors. Careful consideration is given to all applicants. The primary factors reviewed are undergraduate records, recommendations from academic and professional references, adherence to Evangel’s values, and the scores on entrance exams.

Admission Requirements

Applicants who have met the following criteria will be considered for admission to the Graduate Studies program:

  • Hold an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university or be accepted into an Evangel University 5-year BS/MS degree program
  • Have a grade point average of 3.0 or better in the last 60 hours of undergraduate work or last two years as a full-time undergraduate or graduate student
  • Provide official results of required entrance examinations (see specific program requirements listed in this catalog)
  • Meet specific departmental requirements as stipulated in the individual program descriptions.

Application Procedures

Applicants to Graduate Studies shall submit the following:

  • Graduate Admission Application, including a personal statement of faith and life goals
  • A current resumé
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate credits
  • Signed Evangel University Lifestyle Covenant Agreement
  • Three letters of recommendation (see specific program requirements for details)
  • Official score reports of appropriate entrance exams (see program requirements)
  • Nonrefundable application fee of $25
  • Counseling Program Only: Recent scholarly paper in APA format

Admission to the Graduate Studies program means only that the student will be permitted to enroll for courses in the various graduate programs. It does not imply that the graduate student will be accepted for candidacy. Students enrolled in Graduate Studies courses are classified as regular, provisional, probationary or special admission standing.

International Students

Evangel University believes that students from various cultures and backgrounds significantly contribute to the educational community. The diversity that comes from their experiences enhances the environment of faith and learning. Prospective graduate international students should contact the College of Adult & Graduate Studies at 417-865-2815 ext. 8276 for information regarding the issuance of I-20s and other important documents.

TOEFL Score Requirements

To qualify for admission, international students whose first language is not English must earn a TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based exam, 213 on the computer-based or 79-80 on the Internet-based exam. Information on the TOEFL exam can be found at www.toefl.org.

Classification of Graduate Students

Regular Standing

Students who intend to obtain a degree, or a certificate or credential at the graduate level, and who are admitted without reservation are granted regular standing in Graduate Studies. To qualify for regular standing, all admission requirements must be satisfied. Please refer to the specific program for a list of admission requirements.

Provisional Standing

Students who intend to obtain a graduate degree, or a certificate or credential at the graduate level, who have not fully met all the admission requirements of the specific program may be eligible for admission as a provisional standing student. Please refer to the admission requirements of the specific program. Upon successful completion of the first required six to twelve graduate units of the program with a 3.0 GPA or higher, and with no C grades or below, and with the recommendation of program coordinator and faculty, the student will be eligible for regular standing.

Probationary Standing

Students whose cumulative GPA drops below 3.0 while they are in the graduate program, or who fail to meet standards established by their program in other facets of the curriculum, or who receive three C grades in their coursework, will be placed on probationary standing. Students with a GPA below 3.0 are not eligible for advancement to candidacy.

Special Admission

Students who do not plan to earn a degree, credential or certificate, or who have not yet completed the full admission application process, may be granted special admission (special admit) standing. A special admit student is not officially admitted into the graduate program; the student completes an abbreviated application form for authorization to enroll.

A special admit student must officially apply to the Graduate Studies program if he/she wishes to be considered for regular standing in the degree program. All program admission requirements and deadlines must be satisfied for admission consideration to the graduate degree program. The University and its Graduate Program are not obligated legally or morally to accept a special admit student into degree status.

Special admission students who choose to pursue a degree later may not apply more than 12 credits taken as a non-degree seeking student toward degree requirements. A $15 application fee is due upon application as a special admit student. Special admit student forms are available through the Graduate & Professional Studies Admissions office, Graduate Studies office or online at www.evangel.edu/GraduateStudies/Forms.

Note: A special admit student is not eligible for institutional and/or federal financial aid.

Auditor

Students who wish to attend graduate classes for personal enrichment, and not for academic credit, may be granted auditor’s status. Auditors attend class with no obligations to participate actively in the work. Students seeking auditor’s status must complete an abbreviated admission form. Audit fees are required for each class in which audit students enroll. These classes are non-unitbearing courses. An audit course cannot be turned into a “unit course” after the first week of class.

Financial Information

Inquiries regarding student financial matters should be directed to the Evangel University Office of Student Financial Services or the Office of the Bursar (Student Billing). Student Financial Services exists to assist students in planning and procuring funds for educational costs. Prospective students desiring information about ways to finance their university education should direct their questions to Student Financial Services and pursue all forms of financial assistance.

Tuition and Fees

2018-2019 Tuition (per credit hour)

ProgramCost
Education - Doctoral Program $600
Education - Master's Programs $300
Organizational Leadership $400
Counseling $400
Kinesiology $400
Audit (per credit hour) 1/2 credit hour rate

 

2018-2019 Fees (non-refundable)

FeeCost
Application (one-time) $25
Late Registration $100
Student Photo ID/Security Card (one-time) $25
Graduation/Certification Filing $100
Official Transcripts (per transcript) $5
Transcript Evaluation $50
Full-Time Student Fee Seated (Four or more hours) $220 per semester
Full Time Student Fee Hybrid (Four or more hours) $165 per semester
Part-Time Student Fee (less than 4 credit hours) $80 per semester

Additional fees may be attached to particular courses.

Semester charges are due and payable on or before financial registration. After the financial aid listed on your award letter has been applied, the remaining semester balance is due in full or over four months according to the monthly payment plan.

There is a $50 deferred payment fee per semester. There is no monthly interest charge; however, a $25 late payment fee is assessed for each late payment. Evangel accepts MasterCard, VISA, Discover Card, American Express, cash and personal checks.

The University reserves the right to change tuition, fees and other charges without advance notice should conditions so warrant.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is a supplement to help meet University costs. Application for financial aid must be made each year. Financial assistance can be obtained from a variety of sources, including federal financial aid, outside sources such as private scholarships, veterans’ benefits and vocational rehabilitation. All sources of financial aid may be used to establish payment schedules and meet costs of the program.

Students must meet the eligibility requirements to receive any form of federal financial aid. Eligibility is established by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which may be completed at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Federal financial aid options available to graduate students include the following:

Loans

Students must be attending school at least half-time to receive a federal unsubsidized Direct Loan. After the FAFSA has been processed, the results will be reviewed and students will be informed about loan eligibility. All loans require the completion of a Master Promissory Note and MUST be repaid.

Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan

An unsubsidized loan is not awarded on the basis of need. Recipients are charged interest from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. Accumulated interest will be capitalized – that is, the interest will be added to the principal amount of the loan and additional interest will be based upon the higher amount.

If you have any questions regarding the financial aid process, please contact Student Financial Services at Evangel University. Additional information regarding financial aid options, policy, and procedures can be viewed viewed under Financial Aid.

Veterans Benefits

Evangel University is approved for training under the provisions of all applicable regulations of the Veterans Administration and the Missouri State Department of Veterans Affairs.

Assistantships

Enrolled graduate students may be awarded an assistantship for both the first and second year of study. A graduate assistant will be assigned to work with a faculty member to assist in teaching a course or in conducting research. Typical assistantships require five to ten hours of work per week, and result in a taxable stipend that is generally equal to the pay of a part-time job. Assistantships are awarded on a yearly basis, therefore be must be renewed annually. 

Decisions regarding the awarding of assistantships are made by the program coordinator. The assistantships are awarded based upon the following criteria:

  • Strong academic record
  • Skills and strengths of the applicant
  • Availability for service

When awarded an assistantship, the student will be notified in writing regarding the dollar amount of the assistantship, the semesters of expected service, the number of hours to be worked, and the faculty supervisor. 

Scholarships

Students in some programs may be awarded yearly scholarships in varying amounts. Scholarships must be renewed annually. Awarding of scholarships is determined based on a combination of the following factors:

  • Strong academic record
  • Financial need
  • Involvement in service and/or professional organization

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Federal regulations require Student Financial Services to carefully monitor academic progress for all students receiving federal financial aid. Students must make satisfactory academic progress (SAP), including maintaining a 3.0 grade point average, to continue receiving financial assistance. If a student fails to meet SAP requirements by the end of the academic year, they will be placed on SAP suspension. Financial aid suspension will result in the loss of all federal and institutional aid. The student does have the option to appeal if they are placed on SAP suspension.  A student who successfully appeals a financial aid suspension will be placed on financial aid probation and will have their aid eligibility reinstated for the following academic year while also agreeing to an academic plan to assist the student in meeting the SAP requirement.  See our Financial Aid Policies and Procedures to review our complete SAP Policy.

Official Transcripts

Current and former students may obtain copies of their official transcripts (if all financial obligations to the University have been met) by an online request or an in-person visit to the Records office. The fee is $3 for each official transcript.

Books

Books and other printed notes required for courses offered may be purchased from the campus bookstore (www.neebo.com/evangel-university). Books should be purchased prior to the beginning of the class. The bookstore accepts cash, check or major credit cards. Please consult the refund policy prior to purchasing any textbooks.

Withdrawal

Any student who desires to withdraw from Graduate Studies must complete a written application for official withdrawal from Evangel University. This application is available in the Graduate Studies office. All credits will be computed as of the date the application is made. Failure to attend class does not constitute withdrawal from school.

Evangel assumes certain financial obligations based on student enrollment as fixed at the beginning of the school year. A student who wishes to withdraw may assume certain financial obligations outlined under the Return of Title IV Funds federal refund policy. This could result in significant cost to the student. The Return of Title IV Funds relates to students with federal financial aid. Students without federal funding will refer to the institutional refund policy regarding withdrawal from the University. The Return of Title IV Funds worksheet is available from Student Financial Services.

The return of Title IV funds is calculated by a percentage based on the number of days completed, divided by the number of days in the academic period. Once the 60% point in time has been reached, no federal calculation is required. The withdrawal date will be determined by one of the following criteria:

  • The earliest date the student began the school’s withdrawal process or date the student otherwise provided “official” notice of withdrawal will be used
  • The date of the student’s last documented participation at an academically related activity will be used, if available. If the last date of participation is not available, the midpoint of the semester will be used, if attendance was establlished at the beginning of the term.
  • The date related to any circumstance beyond a student’s control will be used if the circumstances prohibit the student from notifying the University

As stipulated by federal and state governments, withdrawal from the program may jeopardize financial aid for the remainder of the academic year. Questions pertaining to financial aid should be discussed with Student Financial Services. See our full Withdrawal Policy on our website.

Withdrawal Tuition Refunds

Tuition refunds will be issued upon a student’s withdrawal from the University or course load reduction when an official withdrawal form or an official drop/add form is filed with the Graduate Studies Office. Refunds will be based on the date of receipt of the official forms by the Graduate Studies Office according to the following tuition refund schedule:

Semester-Long Courses

First full week of classes 100%
Second full week of classes 75%
Third full week of classes 50%
Fourth full week of classes 25%
After fifth full week of classes 0%

Module Courses

Before the first week of class 100%
Before the second week of class 75%
Before the third week of class 50%
After the third week of class 0%
No drops after the fourth week  

All fees are nonrefundable.

Drop/Add Tuition Refunds

Students who wish to drop or add classes after the term begins should complete a drop/add form with the Graduate Studies office. Forms are available online and must have approval from the student’s advisor before being processed. Tuition for dropped classes will be refunded as follows:

Semester-Long Course

First full week of classes 100%
Second full week of classes 75%
Third full week of classes 50%
Fourth full week of classes 25%
After fifth full week of classes 0%

Module Courses

Before the first week of class 100%
Before the second week of class 75%
Before the third week of class 50%
After the third week of class 0%
No drops after the fourth week  

Re-Enrollment

A student may apply to re-enroll in the program.  When permission is granted, he/she will be charged tuition at the current rate.

Academic Policies

Evangel University Graduate Studies is committed to helping students fulfill personal and professional goals. To that end, Program Coordinators and Academic Advisors may substitute core course requirements for those that better serve individual student goals. The final authority in determining fulfillment of graduation requirements for the Master’s and EdD degrees is the Graduate Studies Council.

Minimum Requirements

Degree requirements vary for specific degrees within academic departments. However, each program must require a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit.

Standards of Responsibility

Graduate students are expected to read and comply with printed regulations. Members of the faculty and Graduate Studies Office will advise students, but program requirements will not be waived nor exceptions granted because a student is unaware of the requirements or policies and procedures.

Students are expected to observe the highest standards of conduct, and they will sign a Lifestyle Covenant Agreement (see Appendix A) affirming their sympathy with and willingness to comply with University standards. Failure to uphold the lifestyle covenant agreement may result in dismissal. Students must assume the responsibility to engage in intellectual study and to comply with all policies and procedures to attain the graduate degree. Evangel University cannot accept the responsibility for the education of any student who is not in sympathy with the purposes and the regulations of the University.

Advancement to Candidacy Status

Students fully accepted to a graduate program must meet specific requirements as defined by their program of study and the Graduate Studies office.

To be considered for candidacy, students must:

  1. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all 500 and 600 graduate coursework with no more than two grades of C (including + or -).
  2. Present a clear plan for completing the program to their Academic Advisor for approval.
  3. Be approved for advancement by their academic advisor. (See specific program requirements).
  4. Submit candidacy forms, as requested, to the Graduate Studies office. Candidacy forms are available for download on Course Commons or can be obtained in the Graduate Studies office.

Remediation plans are created with your advisor when Candidacy standards are not met. Any appeal to Candidacy decisions should follow the Academic Appeal process as outlined in the Graduate Studies Catalog. 

Graduate Transfer Credit

The Program Coordinator may approve transfer of graduate credit hours required in the student’s program from another accredited institution. Evangel University reserves the right to accept or reject any course for transfer. Courses considered for transfer credit must:

  • Have been taken for graduate credit
  • Be applicable toward the degree being earned at Evangel University

Transfer policies may vary for individual programs. Individual graduate program requirements are listed below.

MASTER’S IN ATHLETIC TRAINING DEGREE PROGRAM (ATP)

The ATP at Evangel University seeks to make every student’s experience at Evangel an enjoyable experience. When a student desires to transfer FROM another university TO Evangel University, the following criteria are required.

  1. Complete the application for admission to the ATP through ATCAS. 
  2. Be admitted to Evangel University through the admissions department.
  3. Have a cumulative and/or professional GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  4. Have no more than one “C” letter in graduate courses (500+ sequencing number). C- is not acceptable.
  5. Complete an interview with the ATP educators.
  6. A student who transfers into the MSAT program may petition to waive a course from the professional phase of the curriculum based on a previously taken course.

Procedure for Waiving a Course in the Professional Phase of the AT program:

  1. Written requests to waive a course in the professional phase of the curriculum must be sent to the AT PROGRAM Program Director by Friday noon of the first week of school in order that the material can be reviewed and an answer given to the student prior to the University deadline for withdrawal (without the “W” appearing on the student’s transcript).
  2. All written requests to waive a required course must include documentation supporting the request. This includes, but is not limited to a course syllabus, a course schedule, and course handouts, that clearly identify the content of the course to be waived. Other materials may be requested as needed.
  3. After consulting with the appropriate faculty, either the AT Program Director or the Department Chair will make the final decision whether the course will be waived.
  4. Evangel’s course may not be waived if more than two years have elapsed since the allotment of credit from any university. This policy exists because of curricular content changes in practices, analyses, and program accreditation cycles.
  5. Students will be required to complete the minimum number of hours to graduate, but will not have to repeat waived courses. This will be satisfied by completing electives.

MASTERS IN COUNSELING DEGREE PROGRAMS (Clinical Mental Health and School Counseling)

The Counseling Program Coordinator may approve transfer of a maximum of 9 graduate credit hours required in the student’s program from another accredited institution. Courses considered for transfer credit must be applicable/equivalent to coursework required by the Masters of Counseling Degree and be at least a B- or better. Credits used to fulfill a previously granted degree will not be applied.

MASTERS IN EDUCATION DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Masters of Education in Literacy, Curriculum and Instruction Leadership, or Educational Leadership may approve transfer of a maximum of 9 graduate credit hours required in the student’s program from another accredited institution. Courses considered for transfer credit must be applicable/equivalent to coursework required in the Masters of Education Degree Program with a grade of at least a B- or better.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION PROGRAM (Ed.D.)

The Ed.D. program coordinator may approve transfer of a maximum of 9 credit hours earned beyond the master's degree from another accredited institution upon admission to the Ed.D program. Prospective students who have completed a Specialist of Education (Ed.S.) in Educational Administration may transfer up to 15 credit hours from their Ed.S. degree to satisfy coursework for the Ed.D. Courses considered for transfer credit must be applicable/equivalent to coursework required in the Ed.D. program with a grade of at least a B- or better.

MASTERS IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP (MOL)

The Masters in Organizational Leadership may approve transfer credit of a maximum of 9 credit graduate credit hours required in the student's program from another accredited institution. Courses considered for transfer credit must be applicable/equivalent to coursework required in the Masters in Organiational Leadership Program with a grade of at least a B- or better.

Course Repetition

A student must repeat any graduate course taken at Evangel for which a grade of D or F is received when the course is part of the student’s approved program. If a student makes less than a B in a course that is in the student’s approved program, that course cannot be dropped from the approved program of study.

Probation Policy

Students whose cumulative GPA drops below 3.0 while they are in the graduate program, or who fail to meet standards established by their program in other facets of the curriculum, or who receive three C grades in their coursework, will be placed on probationary standing.

Students with a GPA below 3.0 are not eligible for advancement to candidacy.

Upon completion of the following three conditions, the student will be eligible for a return to regular standing:

  • If the student’s GPA drops below 3.0, the student must bring their cumulative Evangel graduate GPA up to the 3.0 level, or above, within one year. No more than two courses for which a C was earned can be included as part of the degree.
  • If the student has a deficiency in another aspect of the curriculum (e.g., practicum or internship performance, summative assessment performance, psycho-social proficiencies) the student must address the deficiency identified by the department and receive the recommendation of the program faculty and coordinator to return to regular standing.
  • Student will meet with the program coordinator for a progress evaluation conference to determine continuation in the program.

The probationary period is an opportunity for a student to address the issues that brought about the probation. Failure to do so will result in the student’s dismissal from the program. The student’s probationary status will be reviewed at the end of each semester.

Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty is a broad category that includes plagiarism, cheating, and any other deliberate attempts to present false information, falsify records, data, or other information relevant to activity associated with a course or academic function. This list is not exhaustive but intended to summarize the most common types of dishonesty exhibited in academic settings. Responses to academic dishonesty will vary depending upon the level of dishonesty demonstrated. Dishonesty at its lowest level may include that associated with a class assignment and increases in the level of seriousness depending upon the significance of the activity. The highest levels of dishonesty will be defined by multiple events and major exams or projects.

Level 1. Dishonesty may be handled at the discretion of the course faculty member after consultation with the program coordinator. The minimum penalty for such dishonesty should be failure on the particular assignment.

Level 2. Dishonesty at this level will be addressed jointly by the faculty member, academic advisor and program coordinator along with the department chair. Their decision will be reported to the Director of Graduate Studies with the name of the student(s) involved, the nature of the dishonesty, and the decision of the coordinator and faculty member in the matter. The minimum penalty for such dishonesty will be failure on the particular exam or project. The maximum penalty would be failure of the course.

Level 3. Dishonesty at this level must be reported to the Director of Graduate Studies for joint action of the faculty member, academic advisor, program coordinator, department chair and Director. Sanctions may include failure of the course in question, suspension, or dismissal from the Graduate Studies program.

Level 4. Dishonesty on multiple occasions or activities is the highest level and will likely result in suspension or dismissal from the Graduate Studies Program. This decision will be made by the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the faculty member, program coordinator, and department chair.

A student who is suspended will have a period of time to address the identified issues after which matriculation may continue. A dismissed student will not be eligible to reapply.

Normal appeal opportunities are available to students disciplined for academic dishonesty.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism on class assignments may be handled at the discretion of the faculty member. Consultation with the program coordinator is always appropriate. The minimum penalty for such dishonesty should be failure on the particular assignment.

Plagiarism or cheating on major exams or projects must be reported to the program coordinator who will pass on to the Director of Graduate Studies the name of the student involved, the nature of the dishonesty, and the decision of the coordinator and faculty member in the matter. The minimum penalty for such dishonesty will be failure on the particular exam or project. The maximum penalty would be failure of the course.

Plagiarism or cheating on a comprehensive final exam or major project which constitutes a summative assessment must be reported to the Director of Graduate Studies for joint action of the faculty member, program coordinator, and Director. Sanctions may include failure of the course in question or dismissal from the graduate program. Normal appeal opportunities are available to students disciplined for academic dishonesty.

Seniors and Graduate Study

A senior undergraduate student who is enrolled in sufficient coursework to complete the requirements for the bachelor’s degree may enroll with the approval of the Program Coordinator in courses for graduate credit, provided the student’s total enrollment does not exceed seventeen semester hours or six semester hours in a summer term. A maximum of 12 credits from the graduate courses may be applied to the undergraduate degree. After graduation, and upon acceptance into a graduate program, these same credits may also be applied toward the appropriate graduate program.

The Appeal Process

A student in the Graduate Studies program has the right to appeal academic or administrative decisions. The first level of appeal is to the person who made the decision. Following this attempt, students with academic appeals should seek resolution within the academic department through the course faculty member, Program Coordinators or Department Chair depending upon the origin of the decision being appealed. Appeals based upon administrative issues should be pursued through the Academic Advisors. Matters still under dispute may then be formally appealed in writing within one week of being notified of a decision to the Director of Graduate Studies. The director may make a decision on the appeal or refer the matter to the Graduate Studies Council. Responses to the appeal generally will be provided within one week unless referred to the Graduate Studies Council. In those situations, a response will be provided following the meeting of that group.

When resolution is unsuccessful at one level, appeals should be directed to levels higher in the organizational structure than where the decision was rendered, implying a faculty member decision will be appealed to the program coordinator. The chain of academic authority at Evangel University is as follows: Faculty Member or Academic Advisor - Program Coordinator - Department Chair or Director of Graduate Studies - Provost.

Time Limits

All degree requirements must be completed within five years from the date of admission. Time spent on leave of absence is included in the five-year time limit for the completion of the Master’s degree. A student who interrupts the sequence of study may be subject to changes in requirements when returning. Transfer credits must be completed within the five-year statute of limitations.

Incomplete Courses

An I (Incomplete) applies to work of acceptable quality when one or more required assignments are not completed because of illness, accident, death in the family, or other satisfactory reason. The request for an Incomplete should be student-initiated. The Incomplete ( I ) Grade Request Form is obtained from the Graduate Studies Office.

Changing Programs

Students wishing to change their program of study must fill out a Program Transfer Approval Form. This form requires signatures from the current academic program advisor and the the new academic program coordinator. The student will also be required to attach a current transcript and a Statement of Purpose that aligns with the request. When a student transfers from one program to another, they will apply for candidacy either when they have completed 15 credits at Evangel University or after one semester (minimum of 6 credits) in the new program depending upon which option is the lastest.

Withdrawal from the Graduate Program

A student considering withdrawal from the Graduate Program must first have a conference with the Program Coordinator or Academic Advisor. If a student finds it necessary to withdraw from the Graduate Program during a regular academic term, official withdrawal from all classes must be processed. The Adult & Graduate Studies Official Withdrawal form can be obtained from the Graduate Studies Office. When the required signatures are secured, the completed form should be returned to the Graduate Studies Office within 3 business days of the official date of withdrawal. Students who do not officially withdraw from classes will be administratively withdrawn by the Graduate Studies Office.

Failure to withdraw officially may lead to future problems in transferring units to other graduate institutions or when applying for readmission. Students who follow the proper procedures in withdrawing due to justifiable personal circumstances will be classified as having withdrawn in good standing. The tuition refund policy will be observed in cases of official withdrawal from the Graduate Program.

Leave of Absence from the Graduate Program

Students who find it necessary to interrupt the regular sequence of enrollment are expected to file notice of an official leave of absence to ensure proper communication between the student and the Graduate Studies Office. Forms for this purpose are available in the Graduate Studies Office. Time spent on leave of absence is counted in the five-year time limit for graduate coursework. A student is held responsible for academic regulations and program requirements in effect at the time of entrance, provided the student maintains continuous enrollment. A student who interrupts academic enrollment is subject to the academic regulations in effect at the time enrollment is resumed.

Readmission

Students who have been absent from their Graduate Program for two or more consecutive semesters must submit an Application for Readmission to the Graduate Office. All returning graduate students are subject to new graduation requirements that are in effect at the time of their readmission.

Grade Points

Each course receives one grade, combining the results of class work, research and examinations. Grades are indicated by letters, with the following value in honor points given to each.

All references to letter grades in the Graduate Catalog are inclusive of the +/- grading system.

Grade            Quality Points (Per Hour of Credit)

A 4.0
A- 3.7
B+ 3.3
B 3.0
B- 2.7
C+ 2.3
C 2.0
C- 1.7
D+ 1.3
D 1.0
D- 0.7
F 0
AU 0
I 0
V 0
W 0
WP 0
WF 0

Comprehensive Examinations

Required by the Counseling program only. Comprehensive examinations will be administered once each semester, including summer and must be written in entirety during one session. If a student fails any portion of the comprehensive exam during the first attempt, he/she will pay a retake fee equal to the current rate of 1 credit hour tuition corresponding to their program and must rewrite an entirely different and equally comprehensive exam during the second sitting. More than two attempts to pass comprehensive exams must be approved by the Graduate Council.

Comprehensive Exam dates will generally be offered once a semester. Please check with your respective department for exact exam dates and times.

Doctoral Dissertation

A research-based dissertation is required for completion of the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. The traditional method for reporting doctoral research results is a five-chapter dissertation. The dissertation research is the study of a problem of practice that impacts education. The five-chapter report manuscript is prepared by the doctoral candidate under the supervision of the academic advisor. It is approved by the dissertation committee and serves as the culminating project to complete the Doctor of Education degree.

Graduation Requirements

Requirements for graduation with the Master’s degree include:

  • The satisfactory completion of all courses listed on the student’s approved program.
  • A cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all graduate courses that are a part of the student’s approved program.
  • A cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all graduate work completed at Evangel University.
  • Completion of the comprehensive examination with scores stipulated by the department (for the Counseling program).
  • Completion of a research thesis, project, dissertation or non-thesis option as required by the department.
  • Candidates must complete the Application for Graduation early in the semester in which all requirements will be completed. Application deadlines are published each term by the Graduate Studies office.

Students will be considered for graduation when they have met the above requirements and:

  • Have completed the Application for Graduation
  • Have paid the graduation fee
  • Have satisfied all financial obligations to Evangel University.

Commencement

Commencement exercises are held at the end of the spring semester for students who wish to participate. Degrees are formally conferred at the end of the fall,spring and summer semesters. The degree conferral date posted on the transcript is the last day of the semester in which all graduation requirements are met.

Student Services

Bookstore

The Evangel University Founders Bookstore serves the Evangel community. The bookstore offers a large variety of books, Bibles, music, emblematic clothing, greeting cards, school and art supplies, electronics, software, candies, gifts, and sundries. Normal business hours are 9:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. weekdays and 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. Saturdays. Special hours are posted during registration, vacations and summers. Online purchasing available

Career Development

The goal of the Career Development office is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to explore career options. Exploration workshops, individual career counseling and self-directed computer programs are available.The Evangel Web site has an online career bulletin available for students and alumni. A password can be obtained from Career Development.

Cashier

School bills may be paid and checks may be cashed at the Cashier’s window, located in Riggs Hall - Administration Building. Normal hours are 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. weekdays except during the chapel (10:00 - 10:50 a.m.) and lunch hours (12:00 – 1:00 p.m.).

Food Services

Evangel provides food service for all students and employees. Each day a wide variety of entrees, sandwiches, soups, fresh fruits, breads, beverages and desserts are offered. The food service dietitian will work out individual programs for students with special dietary requirements or weight reduction programs prescribed by a physician. Various meal plans are available.

Graduate Student Housing

Graduate Students may apply for off-campus housing, i.e. campus apartments, duplexes, or houses. The residence halls are reserved for undergraduate students only. For information regarding off-campus housing, please contact the Physical Plant office.

Information Technologies

There are nine main computer labs on campus, including the College of Adult & Graduate Studies Student Lounge in Zimmerman 212. All Evangel students, whether resident or non-resident, will be issued a student email account upon registration. This will be the primary account used by professors and staff to contact students. Therefore, students should make it a practice to consult their student email frequently. For additional and current computer information, refer to the Evangel Web site.

Instructional Resource Center

The Instructional Resource Center is located in Zimmerman Hall, Room 204.

The IRC provides curriculum and instructional materials as well as media materials and equipment to enable students to prepare for instruction.

International Students

Evangel welcomes students from various cultures and believes they contribute significantly to the community. The Director of Student Life provides support services for all international students. Services include, but are not limited to orientation, career and academic counseling, resource referrals and social activities.

Library

The Klaude Kendrick Library has approximately 19,000 square feet of space and is within a ten-minute walk of all campus buildings and residence halls. The Library has over 120,000 catalogued books and bound periodicals. This includes a collection of about 20,000 microfiche book titles and 10,000 microfilm rolls of serials. The library also has subscriptions to large and growing collections of ebooks from various vendors. The Library makes available to all students the online version of the ERIC database from 1966 to date. The following databases are also available online: EBSCO Host; ProQuest; PsycARTICLES; PsycINFO; ATLA; Christian Periodical Index (CPI); Religious & Theological Abstracts. New databases are added each year as they become available.

Regular Hours

Monday-Thursday      7:30 a.m. - 11:45 p.m.

Friday                       7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Sunday                     8:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.

Special hours are posted during registration, vacations, and summers.

Hours are subject to change.

Post Office

Graduate students may request a post office box on campus. The Post Office is located in Riggs Hall. Students may mail packages and purchase postal supplies, including envelopes, post cards, stamps and foreign air sheets.

Recreational Facilities

The Mabee Student Fitness Center contains facilities that support intramural sports programs as well as general student recreation and fitness. Two basketball/volleyball courts, two racquetball courts, an indoor jogging track, an aerobics exercise room, and an extensive collection of top-of-the line exercise and weightlifting equipment are available in the Mabee Center for graduate students enrolled in four or more hours.

Public Safety

The Evangel Public Safety Department has the primary responsibility to protect Evangel community members and property. The Public Safety Department office is located in Riggs Hall. The department offers special services, including campus escort service, vehicle registration, traffic control, building security and assistance in medical emergencies. Dial extension 7000 on campus, for services.

Student Union

The Cantrell Student Union and The Joust provide a place for relaxation and recreation, including computer access. The Joust offers a variety of grilled and cold sandwiches and daily lunch entrées, as well as salads, pizza, pastries, beverages, fruit and snacks.

Wellness Center

The Wellness Center is located in the John K. Cantrell Student Union and encompasses the Health Services and Counseling Services available to current students. Professionally trained counselors provide help to graduate students with their academic, personal or spiritual problems during the spring and fall semesters when enrolled in four or more credit hours. This professional service carefully guards confidentiality.

Graduate Degrees in Education

Evangel University School of Graduate Studies provides opportunities for advanced studies in education. The Doctoral and Master of Education degree programs prepare the Christian educator— one who is dedicated to instructional improvement, leadership and service to students— with the knowledge and skills essential to educate in our dynamic, multicultural environment.

Department Theme

“Caring, Committed, Competent Educators Shape the Future”

Graduate Degrees in Education

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction Leadership

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction Leadership program is designed for the educator whose career goal is to become an instructional expert and teacher leader. The program provides a unique opportunity to integrate study, research and practical experience to enhance the teacher’s expertise.

Master of Education in Literacy

The Master of Education in Literacy program prepares educational leaders in the field of reading as teachers, clinicians, supervisors, directors and coordinators of reading programs. Students explore trends and issues, and literacy assessments, and develop effective methods and strategies for reading instruction.

Master of Education in Educational Leadership

The Master of Education in Educational Leadership program prepares graduates for educational leadership positions at the school, district, state and national levels. Graduates will demonstrate conceptual, organizational, political, social, managerial, interpersonal and technical skills essential for successful school administrators. The program meets Missouri curriculum requirements for elementary or secondary principal certification.

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction

The Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction program is designed for the educator whose career goal is to become an instructional expert and organizational leader. The program provides a unique opportunity to integrate study, research and practical experience to enhance the educator’s expertise. The program requires candidates to develop and produce original research adding to the knowledge base, develop comparative and analytical thinking skills, and develop an understanding of the skills and traits of successful leaders in the field of education at either the K-12 level or Higher Education.

The K-12 emphasis provides the coursework for an individual to become a lead educator in a school district. With an emphasis in Curriculum and Instruction, the degree would provide the education and training for an individual to be a curriculum specialist, an assessment officer, a secondary level department chair, or a professor in an educator preparation program. With the embedded value-added option, coursework may also be adapted to prepare for central office certification.  In all coursework, use of technology as an instructional tool will be emphasized and articulated.

Accreditation

All Teacher Education Programs at Evangel University are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) and are approved by the Missouri State Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

The Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education Office of Educator Quality is working with representative stakeholders groups to redesign the standards for educator preparation including certification requirements. These changes and implementation schedule will be communicated to students through individual advising sessions, meetings, and/or other university communications. If there are any questions and/or concerns, please contact the Director of Educator Preparation in the Office of Educator Quality.

Objectives for Graduate Education Program

Candidates for the Master of Education degree will become effective practitioners through classroom learning, research and analysis of model programs.

A graduate of the education program:

  • demonstrates a commitment to lifelong learning and improvement through reflection on, engagement in, and application of educational research and identified best practices.
  • demonstrates an engagement in deep-level reflection on, study of, and conversation about the integration of their Christian faith with their learning, life, and vocation.
  • demonstrates an understanding of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of their discipline within the context of a global society.
  • demonstrates an understanding of and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and insure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of students.
  • demonstrates an ability to design curriculum and to engage in and lead curriculum planning based on state and district standards.
  • builds learning networks through creating strong relationships and professional partnerships with school and university personnel, families, and community agencies in order to produce greater student success.
  • understands how students learn and develop and provides opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of students.
  • uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
  • is able to clearly articulate his or her mission as an educator, drawing on the rich resources of a Christian understanding of vocation, and faithfully carries out that mission.
  • pursues continuous growth in their spiritual, emotional, and physical life, and contributes to the growth and wellness of others.
  • exhibits a personal philosophy of education based on the Judeo-Christian ethic, which demonstrates compassion for human need and unique human differences, an understanding and appreciation for the multicultural heritage of humanity, and a sensitivity to differing value systems.
  • effectively designs and implements instruction for diverse groups of learners, aligning instruction with national, state, and local standards in a positive learning environment.

Education Department Admission Policies

In addition to general admission policies, the Education Department requires:

  • Three letters of recommendation, including one letter for Christian character recommendation. The remaining letters are to be from at least two of the following categories:
    • a school administrator who is familiar with the applicant’s competence and professional effectiveness
    • an undergraduate advisor or university faculty member
    • a student teaching supervisor or fellow teacher, or an employer
  • A GPA of 3.0 or higher in undergraduate or graduate coursework. A student with a GPA of less than 3.0 may be considered for provisional admission.
  • Passing score on the Missouri Content Assessment or other comparable tests required by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
  • Completion of the Missouri Education Profile (MEP)

Advancement to Candidacy Status for Master's Programs

Students admitted to a Graduate Education program of study will be considered for candidacy after completion of 12 credit hours of graduate coursework at Evangel University. To be considered for candidacy, students must:

  • Be accepted into a Master’s degree program in Education (Literacy, Curriculum and Instruction Leadership, or Educational Leadership).
  • Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all 500 and 600 graduate coursework with no more than two grades of C (including + or -).
  • Submit candidacy forms to the Graduate Studies office. Candidacy forms are available for download on Course Commons or can be obtained in the Graduate Studies office.

Students approved for candidacy will be notified by letter from the Graduate Studies office.

Evidence of Satisfactory Progress - Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction

Students become candidates for the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) upon acceptance into the program. Course-Embedded Assessments (CESA) are used as benchmarks to determine satisfactory student achievement of program outcomes. Evidence of satisfactory progress in the Ed.D. must be shown each term in order for a doctoral candidate to continue in the program. This evidence includes:

  • Maintaining a 3.0 GPA or higher.
  • Timely completion of course assignments.
  • Satisfactory attendance according to guidelines in course syllabi.
  • Obtaining a score of 3 or 4 on each Course-Embedded Assessment.

Summer Graduate Studies

Evangel University offers a unique format for summer graduate courses. Courses are offered in summer blocks of four weeks each. The curriculum is designed so that students may begin coursework with any one of the blocks. Students may enroll for a maximum of six hours of credit in each block.

Literacy Partnerships

A credit limit of 12 credits earned through Literacy Partnership courses are accepted towards a Masters of Education at Evangel University. The credits must meet program requirements as per the degree requirements for each respective master degree program (see Degree Requirement Worksheets).  These courses will be preapproved by the Graduate Education Committee.

Master of Education In Curriculum and Instruction Leadership

Without TESOL Emphasis

Hours Required: 30

This program is a non-certification program.                                                                           

Required Courses 
Courses

Credits

   
Core Requirements - 19 Credits:  
EDL 509 Action Research 3
EDU 512 Special Education: Consulting with Parents and Teachers 2
EDL 535 Leadership in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum 3
EDU 563 Educational Assessment  3
EDU 582 Special Studies in Classroom Management and Discipline 2
EDU 633 Educational Psychology Applied 3
RDG 513 Content Area Reading Education 3
Electives - 11 Credits from the following electives:  
EDL 515 Administration of Special Programs 3
EDL 525 School Law and Ethics 3
EDL 527 Communications for Effective Leadership 1
EDL 565 School Supervision and Improvement 3
EDL 643 Organizational Management 3
EDL 665 Human Relations and Collaborative Processes 3
EDL 675 Administration of Instructional Programs 2
EDU 590 Literacy Workshop 3
RDG 620 Leadership in Literacy 3
TES 636 Second Language Acquisition 3
 or other special course offerings as approved by advisor  

With TESOL Emphasis

Hours Required: 32

This program is a non-certification program.  

The TESOL emphasis would not fully meet the requirements for the ELL K-12 enforsement in the state of Missouri.

 

Required Courses 
Courses

Credits

   
Core Requirements - 19 Credits:  
EDL 509 Action Research 3
EDU 512 Special Education: Consulting with Parents and Teachers 2
EDL 535 Leadership in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum 3
EDU 563 Educational Assessment  3
EDU 582 Special Studies in Classroom Management and Discipline 2
EDU 633 Educational Psychology Applied 3
RDG 513 Content Area Reading Education 3
TESOL Emphasis Requirements - 13 Credits:  
TES 533  Language and Culture 3
TES 536 ESL Methods 3
TES 545 History and Structure of the English Language 3
TES 597 ESL Practicum 1
TES 636 Second Language Acquisition 3

Master of Education In Literacy

Hours Required: 35-38

This program of study requires 35 hours for graduation (or 38 hours if student is seeking a Missouri teaching certificate in reading).

Prerequisites for Reading Specialist Certification: Child Psychology and Adolescent Psychology OR Lifespan Psychology, Education of the Exceptional Child

 

Required Courses
CoursesCredits
EDL 509 Action Research 3
EDU 512 Special Education: Consulting with Parents and Teachers 2
EDU 563 Educational Assessment 3
EDU 582 Special Studies in Classroom Management and Discipline        2
EDU 633 Educational Psychology Applied (elective) 3
RDG 513 Content Area Reading Education 3
RDG 522 Language Development and Literacy 2
RDG 543 Methods of Reading for Students with Literacy Problems 3
RDG 611 Individual Assessment – Intellectual 2
RDG 620 Leadership in Literacy 3
RDG 653 Reading Diagnosis 3
RDG 690 Reading Practicum I (literary lab required for certification only) 3
RDG 691 Reading Practicum II (literary lab required for certification only) 3
Electives  
EDU 698 Research Project 3
EDU 699 Research Thesis 3
RDG 590 Seminar in Reading Topics (Current Literacy Issues/Topics)up to 6 hrs if approved by advisor 1-6
EDU 590 Seminar in Educational Topics (up to 6 hours if approved by advisor) 1-6
RDG 633 Current Issues and Trends in Reading Education 3
RDG 690 Reading Practicum I (literacy lab elective for non-certification track) 3
RDG 691 Reading Practicum II (literacy lab elective for non-certification track) 3
TES 636 Second Language Acquisition  3

Master of Education in Educational Leadership

Hours Required: 30

REQUIREMENTS:

I. An Initial Administrator Certificate (elementary or secondary principal), valid for a period of four (4) years from the effective date on the certificate, will be issued to applicants meeting the following requirements:

A. One (1) of the following:

1. A permanent or professional Missouri certificate of license to teach;

OR

1. A baccalaureate degree from a state-approved teacher preparation program;

2. A recommendation from the designated certification official from a state-approved teacher preparation program which is included on the Application for Initial Missouri Teaching Certificate; and

3. Achieve a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score on the assessment designated by the State Board of Education for initial certification;

B. A minimum of two (2) years teaching experience approved by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;

C. Successful completion of the building-level administrator’s assessment designated by the State Board of Education;

D. Completion of a course in Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Child;

E. Completion of a master’s degree in educational leadership from a college/university meeting approval of the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education;

 

Required Courses
CoursesCredits
EDL 509 Action Research 3
EDL 515 Administration of Special Programs 3
EDL 525 School Law and Ethics 3
EDL 527 Communications for Effective Leadership 1
EDL 535 Leadership in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum            3
EDL 545 Foundations of Educational Administration 2
EDL 555 The Principalship 3
EDL 565 School Supervision and Improvement 3
EDL 643 Organizational Management 3
EDL 675 Administration of Instructional Programs 2
EDL 685 Leadership Capstone 1
EDL 694 Educational Leadership Internship 3

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership, Curriculum and Instruction

Hours Required: 50

Students seeking Missouri Superintendent Certification must meet the following requirements:

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SUPERINTENDENT (GRADES K-12)

I. PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS:

An Initial Administrator certificate, valid for a period of four (4) years from the date of issuance, will be issued to applicants meeting the following requirements:

A. One (1) of the following:

  1. A permanent or professional Missouri certificate of license to teach;

       OR

  1. A baccalaureate degree from a state-approved teacher preparation program;
  2. A recommendation from the designated certification official from a state-approved teacher preparation program which is included on the Application for Initial Missouri Teaching Certificate; and
  3. Achieve a score equal to or greater than the Missouri qualifying score on the assessment designated by the State Board of Education (board) for initial certification;

B. A minimum of one (1) years’ experience as a building- or district-level administrator at a public or accredited nonpublic school;

C. Successful completion of the district-level administrator’s assessment designated by the board;

D. Completion of a course in Psychology and/or Education of the Exceptional Child;

E. Completion of an educational specialist or advanced degree program in educational leadership and recommendation from the designated official of a college/university approved by the Department of  Elementary and Secondary Education.

  1. The approved graduate credit shall include:
  2. Foundations of educational administration;
  3. City school administration;
  4. School supervision;
  5. Curriculum construction;
  6. Research and evaluation;
  7. School finance;
  8. School law;
  9. School staff personnel administration;
  10. School/community relations; and
  11. School plant design and operation

F. A recommendation from the designated certification official from a state-approved educational specialist or advanced degree program for the preparation of superintendent; this must be part of the Application for Superintendent’s Certificate.

 

Required Courses
CoursesCredits
EDL 701 Leadership Seminar: Community Relations 1
EDL 702 Leadership Seminar: Policy Analysis 1
EDL 705 Ethics and Decisions of School Leaders 3
EDL 709 Resource Management 3
EDL 711 Advanced Supervision 3
EDL 713 Cultural Competence 3
EDL 720 Introduction to Dissertation Research 2
EDL 723 Research Methods and Statistics 3
EDL 729 Data Analysis for School Improvement 3
EDL 733 Teacher As Leader 3
EDL 751 Advanced Curriculum and Design 3
EDL 755 Evidence Based Instruction and Learning 3
EDL 757 Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction 3
EDL 759 Contemporary Issues in Curriculum and Instruction
EDL 761 Educational Funding
EDL 781 Leadership Internship
EDL 790 Dissertation Seminar and Proposal
EDL 796 Dissertation: Directed Research
EDL 796 Dissertation: Directed Research
EDL 796 Dissertation: Directed Research* 1
*-as needed for completion

Course Descriptions for Education

Educational Leadership (EDL)

509. ACTION RESEARCH (3)

This course enables graduate students in Education to become acquainted with the literature on educational research methodologies, and to develop an understanding of such methodology in light of assessment and instruction. The goal is not only to become a critical reader of research reports, but also a consumer and producer of educational research. The Action Research process for improving teaching and learning in classrooms at all levels is explored. Students will use the model to develop and conduct research and use the data to answer significant questions about individual or collective student learning concerns or issues.

515. ADMINISTRATION OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS (3)

Designed as an entrance level course for the study of student personnel programs. Provides a broad overview of the essential elements of special education, guidance and counseling, activity and other student support programs as outlines by the E.L.C.C. and I.S.L.L.C. standards as well as the EAD Knowledge Base.

525. SCHOOL LAW AND ETHICS (3)

Designed to provide educational leaders and policy makers with practical knowledge of constitutional, statutory and case law and ethics relevant to issues affecting the organization and administration of public schools.

527. COMMUNICATIONS FOR EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP (1)

Emphasizes speaking, listening and writing skills for educational leaders. Course content includes internal communication with school faculty and staff as well as external communication with parents and community.

535. LEADERSHIP IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY CURRICULUM (3)

Emphasizes the instructional role of the educational leader. Course content includes the history, politics, process, and current trends in both elementary and secondary curriculum development and implementation.

545. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION (2)

Designed to provide an introduction to the major issues involved in educational administration. The student will also become oriented to the Evangel University Christian Leadership Development Model. As part of this course the student will become knowledgeable of the standards for educational leadership developed by the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) and begin to develop a portfolio validating individual competence for each standard.

555. THE PRINCIPALSHIP (3)

Aims to prepare future principals for transformational leadership by conceptualizing their role as learners, mentors, supervisors, managers, politicians and advocates. Organized around the six Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards, the course prepares educators for their complex role of creating learning communities.

565. SCHOOL SUPERVISION AND IMPROVEMENT (3)

Designed as an introductory course in supervision and personnel issues. The course provides a broad overview of the essential elements of recruiting, training and nurturing quality instructional staff members as outlines by the E.L.C.C. and I.S.L.L.C. standards as well as the EDL Knowledge Base.

643. ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3)

The prospective educational leader examines aspects of educational organizational behavior, including, but not limited to organizational culture, leadership, motivation, change, conflict, and decision-making. Particular attention paid to issues arising from No Child Left Behind Act and maintaining high standards of scholarship.

675. ADMINISTRATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS (2)

Designed to equip the administrator with the tools to guide curriculum development, instructional development, and staff development within a school.

685. EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP CAPSTONE (1)

Designed to be the last course a student takes in the Educational Leadership program. It is designed to provide the student the opportunity to complete the required portfolio, demonstrate knowledge and skills required with the ISLLC standards and take the assessments necessary for graduation from the Educational Leadership program.

694. EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP (3)

Field and Clinical Experiences for (3) semester hours with a minimum requirement of three hundred (300) clock hours as required by DESE for certification.

701. LEADERSHIP SEMINAR -COMMUNICATIONS (1)

The course will involve the study of the nature, scope, principles and practices of public relations, communication and collaboration among professional educators and the school community.

702. LEADERSHIP SEMINAR - POLICY ANALYSIS (1)

This course examines the politics of education at the building, district, state and national level. Both policy development and the changing role of government in education will be discussed.

705. ETHICS AND DECISIONS OF SCHOOL LEADERS (3)

The course will explore leadership theories, power and authority in organizations, leader effectiveness and decision-making processes, and organizational reform. Emphasis will be placed on understanding ethical leadership and decision-making in organizations facing challenges and organizational change.

709. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

The course will involve the study of school design, maintenance and resource management. Emphasis will be placed on enrollment, location, staffing and equipping the organization with appropriate resources.

711. ADVANCED SUPERVISION (3)

The course will involve the study of evaluation of educational programs and personnel. Emphasis will be placed on studying school improvement through the measurement of outcomes in school performance through the lens of personal and program evaluation. Systems Theory and the Christian Leadership Model will be reviewed.

713. CULTURAL COMPETENCE (3)

The course will include an investigation of the basic principles and practices of organizations regarding diversity and multicultural programs. Emphasis will be placed on how school personnel and organizational programs meet the needs of diverse and/or multicultural populations.

720. INTRODUCTION TO DISSERTATION RESEARCH (2)

The course will aid students in the development of their dissertation research proposal. Course content will focus on helping the student develop a deeper understanding of academic research and the structure of the dissertation project.

723. RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS (3)

The course will introduce students to the basics of educational research including statistical techniques, qualitative and quantitative research and research design. Students will also investigate methods of evaluating research and published articles.

729. DATA ANALYSIS FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT (3)

The course will include the study of techniques used in evaluation of programs. Topics will include identifying evaluation targets, collecting and interpreting appropriate data, developing an action plan, and reporting meaningful results to stakeholders.

733. TEACHER AS LEADER (3)

The course will focus on the concepts of teacher leaders and the activities and responsibilities involved in leading teachers or adult learners. The course is designed to move teachers to leadership roles within the field of education. Leadership concepts appropriate for classroom instructor or instructional coaches will be emphasized.

751. ADVANCED CURRICULUM AND DESIGN (3)

The course will investigate the major components and theories of curriculum design at the organizational level.

755. EVIDENCE BASED INSTRUCTION & LEARNING (3)

The course will study research-based and research-supported teaching strategies. Students will be exposed to and apply current theory and practices designed to improve classroom instruction.

757. DIFFERENTIATING CURRICULULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3)

The course will provide students with strategies to successfully differentiate instruction by differentiating the content, process, or product. Emphasis will be placed on the development of school programs that implement differentiated instruction.

759. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3)

The course will analyze significant developments and trends in curriculum and instruction. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of differing points of view concerning policies and practices of curriculum and instruction. Visionary Leadership will be a focus of the discussion regarding current and future educational practice.

761. EDUCATIONAL FUNDING (3)

The course will investigate school budgeting procedures and the relationship with local, state and federal funding of school operations. Funding resources and management of private funds will also be discussed.

781. LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP (3)

The course will engage students in a 300 clock-hour field experience. Students will gain the knowledge, insight and current issues facing practitioners while working with a current school leader.

790. DISSERTATION SEMINAR AND PROPOSAL (1)

THe course will require students to develop a draft dissertation research proposal. Students will discuss theories of research and the process of hypothesis development.

796. DISSERTATION DIRECTED RESEARCH (3)

The course sequence will require students to develop a research proposal to be presented to an advisor, the research committee, and the research review board. Upon approval the research project will be completed and defended.

Education (EDU)

500. RESEARCH PROJECT/THESIS (OFF CAMPUS) (0)

Designed to allow graduate students in the Education program to maintain at least half-time enrollment while working on project/thesis during fall/spring semesters. Students choose when they pay for EDU 698/699 and until they pay, they stay registered for the course.

501. IMPLEMENTING VOCATIONAL BUSINESS EDUCATION PROGRAMS (3)

In-depth investigation of curriculum development and implementation of vocational business education classes on the high school and middle school level. Includes research of issues and procedures for career and technical education in the public and private sectors leading to knowledge of core competencies for marketing education programs.

507. RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS (3)

Overview of basic research processes and the skills necessary to develop and conduct graduate research projects. Addresses issues related to the philosophy of science and the development role of scientific inquiry in research along with specific issues related to research design.

509. ACTION RESEARCH (3)

This course enables graduate students in Education to become acquainted with the literature on educational research methodologies, and to develop an understanding of such methodology in light of assessment and instruction. The goal is not only to become a critical reader of research reports, but also a consumer and producer of educational research. The Action Research process for improving teaching and learning in classrooms at all levels is explored. Students will use the model to develop and conduct research and use the data to answer significant questions about individual or collective student learning concerns or issues.

512. SPECIAL EDUCATION- CONSULTING WITH PARENTS AND TEACHERS (2)

Explores counseling techniques, current issues, trends, and problems in all areas of exceptionalities, including the gifted and at-risk populations. Includes communication skills with exceptional children and their families. Topics are determined by current legislative initiatives and school trends.

533. THEORIES, PROBLEMS AND PRACTICE IN CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3)

An exploration of contemporary curriculum development theories that impact the organization and structure of schools today. Provides a comprehensive analysis of the process of curriculum development.

535. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY (2)

Designed to aid teachers in becoming better acquainted with the broad range and interrelated use of instructional media materials and techniques. Emphasis on the practical problem of choosing, using, and inventing instructional materials.

535. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY LAB (0)

Lab

536. METHODS IN SECONDARY TEACHING SPECIALTY (3)

Emphasizes the fundamentals of teaching methods, curriculum, and techniques in a selected subject area. The student will select the major area of emphasis.

543. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION (3)

Explores the basic philosophical and historical foundations that undergird the American educational system.

545. ANALYSIS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT (3)

Cross listed with MKT 545.

563. EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT (3)

Designed to supply professional educators with the tools and techniques to assess student achievement.

582. SPECIAL STUDIES IN CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND DISCIPLINE (2)

Presents models of classroom management and related discipline issues. Research oriented with a focus in the diversity of current American culture and classroom practices.

584. BUILDING A COMMUNITY-BASED CAREER READY CURRICULUM-TIER 1 (3)

This two tiered course is designed to assist practicing teachers in developing timely relevant curriculum regarding community career needs to students throughout Springfield Public Schools. This course represents a collaborative effort between Springfield Public Schools and Evangel University and the Springfield business community. Course by permission only.

585. BUILDING A COMMUNITY-BASED CAREER READY CURRICULUM-TIER 2 (3)

This two tiered course is designed to assist practicing teachers in developing timely relevant curriculum regarding community career needs to students throughout Springfield Public Schools. This course represents a collaborative effort between Springfield Public Schools and Evangel University and the Springfield business community. Course by permission only.

590. SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL TOPICS (2)

Seminar in current educational topics.

591. SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL TOPICS (2)

Seminar in current educational topics.

592. SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL TOPICS (2)

Seminar in current educational topics.

627. SEMINAR IN STUDENT TEACHING (1)

Addresses current issues in education. Conducted by faculty and university supervisors for all student teachers. Must be taken concurrently with student teaching.

633. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY APPLIED (3)

Designed for Education majors as they progress from the role of practitioners to research-scientists. Incorporates psychological theory, research, and practice in the classroom.

690. PRACTICUM IN SUBJECT AREA SPECIALTY I/II (1)

The course is a clinical experience in which students are assigned to the school for three or more hours per week. This experience will be in the subject area specialty.

691. PRACTICUM IN SUBJECT AREA SPECIALTY III (2)

The course is a clinical experience in which students are assigned to the school for three or more hours per week. This experience will be in the subject area specialty. This course will be taken the semester prior to student teaching.

697. SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING (8)

Student observe and then teach under the direction of a cooperating educator and University supervisor.

698. RESEARCH PROJECT (3)

An independent project that shows the student's ability to conduct scholarly research that has a significant application. The student must follow the guidelines listed in the department for seeking permission, defending, and submitting the project.

699. RESEARCH THESIS (3)

An independent study that demonstrates the student's ability to complete a scholarly research thesis. The student must follow the guidelines listed in the department for seeking permission, defending, and submitting the thesis.

Reading (RDG)

513. CONTENT AREA READING EDUCATION (3)

Examines diagnostic, methodological, organizational, and administrative issues related to content reading instruction. Emphasis on research and application of strategies for developing functional reading in content fields.

522. LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND LITERACY (2)

Explores the issue of emergent literacy and the relationship of language development and early literacy. Human growth as it relates to the development of oral language, reading, and writing.

543. METHODS OF READING FOR STUDENTS WITH LITERACY PROBLEMS (3)

Provides opportunities to explore effective instructional strategies which assist students with literacy problems. Students explore preventive, early intervention, and remedial strategies.

590. SEMINAR IN READING TOPICS (2)

Seminar in current reading topics

611. INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT-INTELLECTUAL (2)

Presents the theoretical and assessment process of human intelligence. Definitions and nature of intelligence, research, development, and standardization of intelligence. Discusses and critiques major individual intelligence tests. Develops student assessment techniques and skills.

620. LEADERSHIP IN LITERACY (3)

This course offers an in-depth study of literacy leadership and coaching to equip teachers, reading specialists, literacy coaches, district supervisors and administrators to become caring, committed, competent educators in the field of literacy. Building relationships with other professionals in education, identifying student and school needs in literacy, and collaborating to implement literacy instruction at the district and school level will be explored throughout this online course.

633. CURRENT ISSUES AND TRENDS IN READING EDUCATION (3)

Current issues and trends in reading education, such as the whole language philosophy and its effect on reading curriculum and classroom instruction.

653. READING DIAGNOSIS (3)

Current trends and procedures used in assessing literacy problems. Classroom and clinical approaches and current research and knowledge base in literacy education.

690. READING PRACTICUM (3)

Practical experience in formal/informal assessment of students, diagnosis of student strengths and weaknesses, and planning and implementing instruction for reading. Each graduate student is assigned 2-3 students to work with during the practicum.

691. READING PRACTICUM (3)

Provides practical experience in formal/informal assessment of students, diagnosis of student strengths and weaknesses, and planning and implementing instruction for reading improvement. Each graduate student is assigned 2-3 students to work with during the practicum.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TES)

533. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3)

Focuses on the interrelationships of language and culture, aspects of linguistic and cultural diversity, cross-cultural communications, and cultural issues in the classroom. Emphasizes techniques for fostering cooperative learning, resolving conflicts, and meeting student needs in multicultural and language classrooms.

536. ESL METHODS (3)

Provides a knowledge of materials and methods for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Should be taken concurrently with TESL 597 (Practicum).

538. COMPONENT AREAS OF TESOL (3)

This course will delve into the details of teaching any one or a combination of the four component areas of TESOL: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Recent research into teaching of these areas will be presented, and specific teaching concerns will be addressed. The course will systematically analyze the unique factors and guidelines in teaching each of the four skills, with specific focus also given to pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary. Issues addressing literacy will be covered.

539. ESL MATERIALS, CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT (3)

Review and analysis of curriculum, materials, and assessment tools currently used in professional teaching of English to speakers of other languages; research-based discussion of up-to-date practices in course design that most effectivly reach second-language students.

555. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND LINGUISTICS FOR ESL TEACHERS (3)

Grammar for ESL Teachers is a critical study of aspects of modern English grammar important for the teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL) or as a Foreign Language (EFL). Candidates will gain an understanding of the major morphosyntactic and semantic phenomena important for teaching ESL/EFL, become familiar with the practical and theoretical literature on teaching English grammar, participate in practical exercises of grammar correction in writing with actual English Language Learners (ELLs), and develop and compile classroom activities for teaching points of grammar.

593. SPECIAL TOPICS IN TESOL (3)

This course will cover issues related to ESL teaching situations in K-12 schools in the United States. Particular issues covered will include: making content accessible to ELLs through scaffolding and sheltering techniques; aligning formative and summative assessments for ELLs with non-language assessments; working with classroom teachers and administrators.

597. PRACTICUM IN ESL INSTRUCTION (1)

Practicum in ESL Instruction (1-3 credits) (Cross-listed with TES 597) Students in the course will be assigned to an ESL/EFL teaching situation for at least 40-45 hours of supervised academic activity per credit hour.

Kinesiology

Master of Science in Athletic Training

The mission of Evangel’s Athletic Training program (ATP) is to empower athletic training students with the skills they need to succeed in their education program and in life. We seek to offer a variety of experiences as venues of learning for our athletic training students to become well-rounded clinicians. These standards are set forth by the Board of Certification (BOC ©) Role Delineation study and Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) educational competencies. Evangel University is currently seeking to transition the bachelor’s program to a professional master’s program. A self-study report has been submitted to CAATE and is pending approval for admission of students to the professional master’s program beginning June 2017. Upon approval of the professional Master’s degree, the bachelor’s program will cease to admit students. Students will be required to select and complete a bachelor’s degree with required pre-requisites, preferably but not required: Allied Health, to apply for the Master’s professional program.

Admission Policies

  • Before students can be admitted to the program, they must have a Bachelor’s Degree.*
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Complete the necessary pre-requisite courses with a “C” or higher:
      • Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I & II
      • Biomechanics
      • Introduction to Chemistry
      • Introduction to Physics
      • Introduction to Psychology
      • Exercise Physiology
      • Medical Terminology
      • Nutrition
      • First Aid and CPR certification (may acquire by any means prior to admission
  • Students must complete an interview with the ATP faculty. This interview allows the faculty to discuss the expectations and rigors of the program, the student’s perceived strengths and weaknesses, and allows the student to hear and discuss any concerns there may be about their continuance into a  program such as this.**
  • Students must submit a minimum of 35 hours of observational experience under the supervision of an athletic trainer certified by the BOC. These hours must be submitted before a determination can be made about admission.

* Students may be admitted to the athletic training program without a bachelor’s degree if they are enrolled in the accelerated allied health degree (3 year) from Evangel University. ATP 524 will count towards the student’s undergraduate GPA.

** Competitive admission does not mean all students who apply to the program are admitted. Students are selected based on GPA, submission of completed admission requirements, and interview skills in individual interviews with the ATP program selection committee.

Advancement to Candidacy Status

Students admitted to a program of study must apply for candidacy after completion of 15 credit hours of graduate course work at Evangel University. To be considered for candidacy, students must:

  • Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all 500 or 600 graduate coursework with no more than two grades of C (including + or -).
  • Present a clear plan for completing the program to their academic advisor for approval.
  • Be recommended for advancement to candidacy by thier academic advisor.
  • Submit canadidacy forms to the Graduate Studies office. Candidacy forms are available for download on Course Commons or can be obtained in the Graduate Studies office.

In making a final decision regarding student advancement to candidacy, the Program Coordinator will consider whether the student:

  • Demonstrates academic competency and professional integrity and ability in the program.
  • Propose a course of study with sufficient merit.
  • Demonstrates spiritual maturity and values consistent with Evangel University standards.
  • Exhibits research skills, a professional attitude, and psychological health that justify continuation of study toward the Master's degree.

Students approved for candidacy will be notified by letter from the Graduate Studies office.

Hours Required: 50
Required Courses
Courses      Credits  
ATP 524   Introduction to Athletic Training 3
ATP 536   Basic Athletic Training   3
ATP 523   Principles of Therapeutic Interventions 3
ATP 566   Assessment of Athletic Injury: Lower Extremity 3
ATP 592   Clinical Experience I in Athletic Training 3
ATP 533   Therapeutic Modalities 3
ATP 586   Assessment of Athletic Injury: Upper Extremity 3
ATP 593   Clinical Experience II in Athletic Training 3
ATP 686   General Medicine and Pharmacology in Athletic Training 4
ATP 643   Rehabilitation Techniques in Athletic Training 4
ATP 576   Assessment of Athletic Injury: Head, Neck, Spine, Trunk       3
ATP 690   Directed Research I in Athletic Training 3
ATP 692   Clinical Experience III in Athletic Training 3
ATP 624   Administration in Athletic Training           3
ATP 693   Clinical Experience IV in Athletic Training 3
ATP 696   Professional Seminar in Athletic Training 3

523. PRINCIPLES OF THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION (3)

This course is designed to give students foundational information that will allow students to apply in therapeutic settings as well as build on in future course work.

524. INTRODUCTION TO ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This is an introductory course into the field of athletic training. This course is designed to introduce students to the various parts of athletic training and sports medicine as well as help coaches and physical educators gain knowledge in the prevention, evaluation, and care for sport related injuries.

533. THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES (3)

This course will give students skills in the use of therapeutic modalities, as well as indications and contraindications for proper use. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

536. BASIC ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will encompass basic athletic training techniques such as: emergency planning and acute care, splinting, taping, padding, bracing, weather analysis, and facility management. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competencies and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

566. ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC INJURY: LOWER EXTREMITY (3)

This course will give students skills in evaluating lower body athletic injuries. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competencies and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

576. ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC INJURY: HEAD, NECK, SPINE, TRUNK (3)

This course will give students skills in evaluating the head, neck, spine and trunk as related to athletic injuries and illnesses. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

586. ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC INJURY: UPPER EXTREMITY (3)

This course will give students skills in evaluating upper body athletic injuries. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

592. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE I IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will give students an opportunity to practice skills and gain knowledge in evaluating lower body athletic injuries. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

593. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will give students an opportunity to practice skills in evaluating upper body athletic injuries. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

624. ADMINISTRATION IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will examine administrative components associated with athletic training, including third party billing procedures, proper medical record keeping, architectural consideration for an athletic training room, various types of health insurance models, and common policies needed to run and maintain daily operations in an athletic training room.

643. REHABILITATION TECHNIQUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (4)

This course will give students skills in the use of rehabilitation techniques, as well as indications and contraindications for proper use. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

686. GENERAL MEDICINE AND PHARMACOLOGY IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (4)

This course will examine general medical conditions and pharmacological information associated with athletic training. This will include identifying common illness and diseases, as well as proper referral procedures. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competencies and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

690. DIRECTED RESEARCH I IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

In this capstone course, the student will select and study a topic in athletic training. Each student selects a faculty advisor to provide guidance in planning, coordinating, conducting and presenting the project. The study can take several different forms including a literature review, case study, or a mentored research project with a faculty member. This project will be presented in ATEP 696; Professional Seminar in Athletic Training.

692. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE III IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will give students an opportunity to practice skills in evaluating the head, neck and spine, and trunk along with evaluations of general medical conditions. This course will also give students experience with athletic equipment and bracing techniques. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

693. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IV IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will give students an opportunity to practice skills and gain knowledge associated with the administration of an athletic training program from a licensed athletic trainer. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

696. PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (3)

This course will give students knowledge in professional development and leadership. This class will address the course objectives as described in the competences and standards put forth by the Board of Certification (BOC) and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

Master of Organizational Leadership

Many busy professionals in business, education, health care, government, or ministry organizations are eager to earn a master's degree that will enhance their potential to lead their organizations or operating units to sustained levels of performance excellence. The Master of Organizational Leadership program is ideal for people with several years of work experience who are in positions of responsibility where they can potentially influence change.

You can earn the Master of Organizational Leadership by completing this 36 credit hour program that integrates Christian principles and the concept of transformational leadership with the skills needed to develop a positive, results-oriented organizational culture that maximizes the potential of its people and the performance of the organization. Knowledge and skills will be immediately utilized in your organization through assignments and projects. Further benefit will come from interacting with other students from all types of organizations. The program projects enable you to develop and demonstrate skills in performing a formal organizational assessment, developing a marketing plan, and developing an improvement analysis of your organization's or work unit's systems and their effectiveness.

The Master of Organizational Leadership program begins in January or July with a residential experience two times each year.

The objectives of the Master of Organizational Leadership program are the following:

  • Develop a personal leadership philosophy that integrates Biblical values and ethics and acquire the skills necessary to effectively lead the organization;
  • Understand the dynamics of global and multi-cultural environments on leadership and organizational behavior;
  • Demonstrate a practical understanding of organizations, cultures, and teams from a systems perspective;
  • Develop knowledge and skills of strategic planning and change management that result in the capacity to take an initiative from planning through implementation stages;
  • Explain essential concepts of budgeting, financial management and risk management for organizational decision-making;
  • Identify and demonstrate effective approaches and skills in written and oral communication to support organizational leadership effectiveness;
  • Describe and demonstrate effective use of technology and processes for organizational feedback, assessment of organizational performance, problem-solving, opportunities for improvement and knowledge management;
  • Describe the values, concepts and behaviors found in high-performing organizations and demonstrate ability to assess organizational performance and identify opportunities for improvement;
  • Understand strategies for developing the organization and its workforce; and
  • Understand factors necessary to create an effective customer and market focus.

Admission Policies

In addition to general admission policies, the Organizational Leadership program requires the following:

  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • A resume identifying past and current leadership and/or management responsibilities.

Students without more extensive work experience will be required to identify an organization which they will be able to use as a resource to meet the course and project requirements.

Advancement to Candidacy Status

Students in the Organizational Leadership program must apply fo candidacy after completion of 13 credit hours of graduate coursework at Evangel University. To be considered for candidacy, students must:

  • Be admitted into the Master of Organizational Leadership program. If admitted on provisional status, this must be removed.
  • Have completed 13 credit hours of graduate coursework at Evangel University.
  • Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all 500 and 600 graduate coursework with no more than two grades of C (including + or -).
  • Submit candidacy forms to the Graduate Studies office. Candidacy forms are available for download on Course Commons or can be obtained in the Graudate Studies office.

Students approved for candidacy will be notified by letter from the Graduate Studies office.

Hours Required: 36

Required Courses
CoursesCredits
MOL 501 Foundations of Leadership 3
MOL 527 Communications and Community Relations 3
MOL 545 Information & Knowledge Management 3
MOL 550 The Effective Organization 3
MOL 555 Lean Six Sigma: Theories & Skills 3
MOL 580 Organizational Analysis Project 1
MOL 596 Leadership Brand Project 1
MOL 601 Strategic Management 3
MOL 645 Managerial Finance 3
MOL 650 Analysis of the Organizational Environment 3
MOL 665 Organizational Design and Development 3
MOL 672 Marketing 3
MOL 675 Developing People and Teams 3
MOL 680 Strategic Management Project 1
Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Requirement:  
MOL 556 Lean Six Sigma Project 4

 

Course Descriptions for Master of Organizational Leadership

501. FOUNDATIONS OF LEADERSHIP (3)

An examination of theories in leadership and management and analysis of assessing organizational leadership effectiveness. Includes an examination of the relationship of personal values, spirituality, ethical choices, and social responsibility and their impact on the leader's ability to influence workplace and public policy. A personal philosophy for effective leadership will be developed.

527. COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS (3)

Explores effective professional communication techniques for writing, speaking and listening. Includes public presentations, formal report and grant writing, and preparation and analysis of policy. Routine business communications and meeting facilitation skills are included.

545. INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (3)

This course examines the development and use of technology systems for supporting the vision and operation of organizations including data warehouses, knowledge management, customer relationship management, and supply chain management.

550. THE EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATION (3)

Examination of the Baldrige National Quality Program's Criteria for Performance Excellence and how it is used to assess and improve organizational performance. Cases will be used to explore effective approaches to assessment, report writing, and evaluation. Students will identify an organization for applied research and a mentor within the corporation who will assist them in obtaining access to the information needed to complete the assignment. All information in the organizational assessments will be confidential.

555. LEAN SIX SIGMA: THEORY AND SKILLS (3)

This course provides the theory and skills for an approach for addressing and solving business problems that meet both customer and business requirements. The Lean Six-Sigma model understanding will result in effective and efficient problem solving skills that lead to Process Optimization, Change Management, and Talent Application. In doing so the student will learn to build a culture of change through a synergetic talent pool.

556. LEAN SIX SIGMA: PROJECT (4)

This course provides an opportunity for students to implement an organizational improvement project following the Lean Six Sigma model that meets both customer and business requirements. In the course, students will demonstrate effective and efficient problem solving skills that lead to Process Optimization, Change Management, and Talent Application. Students participating in this project will receive regular coaching from the course instructor from the project design stage, through implementation and reporting on the project.

580. ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS PROJECT (1)

The organizational analysis project requires the student to complete an applied assessment that demonstrates his/her ability to develop an organizational profile, identify potential gaps in key information and performance requirements, and propose leader's initiatives to close key gaps.

596. LEADERSHIP BRAND PROJECT (1)

The leadership brand project requires the student to complete a strategic marketing plan that addresses real opportunities in an organization or unit of an organization and reflects organizational values. This project allows the student to create a practical and useful expression of his or her own unique leadership brand to the organization.

601. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

Explores the formulation, implementation, and management of key strategies that will maximize the organization's core competencies, fulfill customers' and other stakeholders' expectations, and create a sustained level of performance excellence. The course examines mission, vision, values, long-and short-range goals and objectives, and various kinds of strategies and controls used to develop the organization's direction and sustain its performance.

645. MANAGERIAL FINANCE (3)

Examines the requirements of an effective financial accounting and reporting system and the interpretation of financial reports for proprietary, non-profit, and governmental organizations. Explores decision processes and models for evaluating finance-related options, investing and managing cash, managing and preventing risk, and allocating financial, human, and capital resources. Explores the use of focus groups decision matrixes, control charts, and other tools to investigate problems, analyze data and information, and identify potential solutions.

650. ANALYSIS OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL ENVIRONMENT (3)

Reviews concepts and approaches to develop and analyze an organization's relationship with its "customers", including how to develop and analyze satisfaction surveys, market analysis, quality function deployment (QFD) and other tools to assure that the needs of the organization's current and future customers are met or exceeded.

665. ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

Explores the primary roles of managers and leaders within the context of organizational environments, including economic, technological, political, and social. Organizational design will also be studied in the context of globalization and organizational life cycles and their impact on organizational culture.

672. MARKETING (3)

Discusses the role of public relations in customer relations, stakeholder communications, and business development. Emphasizes an integrated approach with other marketing tools and the importance of ethics and integrity in public communication about the organization and its products and services. Explores concepts that are essential and adaptable to organizations of any size or type, including nonprofits, government, small businesses, and corporations.

675. DEVELOPING PEOPLE AND TEAMS (3)

Examines the organizational human resource function and contemporary techniques for managing human resources. Discussions focus on empowerment, legal issues, work force diversity, managing change, recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation, managing relations, and health and safety.

680. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PROJECT (1)

This project requires students to identify an organizational problem that is amenable to intervention. Students will collect data regarding the problem, propose a solution, and provide data regarding the solution that was developed. In this course, students will apply knowledge of Systems Development, project management, risk management, and data analysis.

Graduate Counseling Programs

The Evangel University Counseling Program trains graduate students to become professional counselors who integrate their Christian faith while providing holistic and ethical counseling services to diverse individuals and groups across the lifespan.

Program Highlights

  • Integration of Christian values and principles as a foundation for ethical practice.
  • Courses are taught by practicioner faculty who are experts in the field of school and/or mental health counseling.
  • Theories and practical applications are integrated throughout coursework.
  • Optional service learning opportunities to Kenya.
  • The program prepares students to become licensed professional counselors and/or certified school counselors in the state of Missouri.

Admission Policies

In addition to general admission policies, the Counseling program requires the following:

  • Hold an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university.
  • 3.0 GPA or combined GRE score of 300.
  • Nine hours of psychology courses plus one undergraduate statistics course (B- or better).
  • Admission application, recommendations, essay, and APA writing sample.

Advancement to Candidacy Status

In order to move to the internship courses, students must have been approved for candidacy. Students admitted to a program of study must apply for candidacy after completion of 18 credit hours of graduate coursework at Evangel University. To be considered for candidacy, students must:

  • Be fully accepted into the Counseling Program.
  • Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on all 500 and 600 graduate level coursework with no more than two grades (six credit hours) of C (including +or -) for non-core courses.
  • Achieve a B grade or higher (3.0) in Counseling Skills and Professional Orientation/Ethics.
  • Complete 18 graduate hours or more in the Evangel University Counseling Program.
  • Present a clear plan for completing the Master’s degree to academic advisor for approval.
  • Be recommended for advancement to candidacy by their academic advisor. Counseling candidates must complete Advancement to Candidacy screening interview.
  • Submit candidacy forms to the Graduate Studies office. These are available for download on Course Commons or can be obtained in the Graduate Studies office.

In making a final decision regarding student advancement to candidacy, the Program Coordinator will consider whether the student:

  • Demonstrates academic competency, professional integrity, and ability in the program.
  • Proposes a course of study with sufficient merit.
  • Demonstrates professional behaviors and dispositions.
  • Demonstrates spiritual maturity and values consistent with Evangel University standards.
  • Exhibits professional attitude, and psychological health that justifies continuation of study toward the master’s degree.

Candidacy interviews are scheduled in May of each academic year. Students approved for candidacy will be notified by letter from the Graduate Studies office.

Professional Behaviors and Dispositions

The Counseling Program expects students to demonstrate specific behaviors and dispositions associated with a counselor identity as researched by Lambie and Swank (2015). Behaviors include professional ethics and boundaries; knowledge and adherence to course/ field site policies and procedures; as well as record keeping and task completion.

Dispositions include multicultural humility (competency); emotional stability and self-control; motivation to learn and grow/initiative; openness to feedback; flexibly and adaptability; congruence and genuineness.

Faculty continually assess student dispositions but formally assess at critical points in the program: admission interview, candidacy and during field courses.

Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

This program provides students with theoretical and practical training necessary to work in a variety of mental health settings. Such settings include community mental health, private practices, medical facilities, substance abuse programs, correctional facilities and more. Since Evangel qualifies as a teaching site for the National Counselor Exam (NCE), eligible students may sit for the NCE prior to graduation. Evangel graduates have a high pass rate on the NCE.

Hours Required: 60

*Elective                             

 Required Courses  
CourseCredits
COU 503 Human Growth and Development                                       3
COU 506 Psychodiagnostics 3
COU 507 Research Methods 3
COU 521 Professional Orientation and Ethics 3
COU 523 Counseling Skills 2
COU 523 Counseling Skills LAB 1
COU 526 Counseling Theories 3
COU 534 Integration of Christianity and the Counseling Profession 2
COU 604 Career Counseling 3
COU 610 Assessment 3
COU 625 Group Counseling 2
COU 625 Group Counseling LAB 1
COU 627 Social and Cultural Diversity 3
COU 505 Child and Adolescent Counseling 3
COU 508 Mental Health Foundations 3
COU 524 Clinical Interventions and Evidence Based Treatments 3
COU 527 Couple and Family Counseling 3
COU 595 Practicum - International Counseling* 1
COU 596 Intercultural Counseling Internship* 1
COU 597 Mental Health Counseling Practicum 3
COU 598 Mental Health Counseling Internship 6
COU 599 Field Continuance 0
COU 628 Crisis, Trauma, and Recovery 3
COU 651 Addiction Counseling* 3
COU 675 Human Sexuality* 3
COU 696 Counseling Professional Capstone

1

Master of Science in School Counseling

This program provides students with theoretical knowledge and training based on standards determined by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Gradutes are prepared to be effective school counselors who serve student and families in public and private school communities. By completing extra electives, students may earn an additional certification as a School Psychological Examiner. Completion of coursework satisfies specific requirements for a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Missouri.

School Psychological Examiner Certification

Students pursuing this certification must possess a valid teaching or student service certificate in addition to a master's degree in Counseling Psychology, Educational Psychology, School Counseling or Education. Upon completion of the certification, students are able to work as psychological examiners or diagnosticians in a school setting serving all ages, including special education, gifted education and Missouri Scholars Academy applicants. Students completing coursework for Evangel's School Counseling track usually are able to obtain this certification by completing an additional three classes, pending transcript reviews.

Hours Required: 60

*Elective

Required Courses
CourseCredits
COU 503 Human Growth and Development 3
COU 506 Psychodiagnostics                            3
COU 507 Research Methods 3
COU 521 Professional Orientation and Ethics 3
COU 523 Counseling Skills 2
COU 523 Counseling Skills LAB 1
COU 526 Counseling Theories 3
COU 534 Integration of Christianity and the Counseling Profession 2
COU 604 Career Counseling 3
COU 610 Assessment 3
COU 625 Group Counseling 2
COU 625 Group Counseling LAB 1
COU 627 Social and Cultural Diversity 3
COU 500 School Counseling Curriculum 3
COU 504 The Exceptional Student 3
COU 509 School Counseling Foundations 3
COU 512 Professional Relationships in School, Family, & Community 3
COU 582 Classroom Management 3
COU 590 School Counseling Practicum 3
COU 591 School Counseling Internship - Elementary 3
COU 592 School Counseling Internship - Secondary 3
COU 611 Intelligence Testing* 3
COU 613 Diagnostic Assessment* 3
COU 632 Psychology of Education 3
COU 695 School Psychological Examiner Practicum 3
COU 697 School Counseling Professional Capstone 1

Course Descriptions for Counseling Programs

500. SCHOOL COUNSELING CURRICULUM (3)

This course is an overview of lesson planning, curriculum organization, and resources appropriate for implementation of the Missouri Comprehensive Guidance program. Course content meets requirements for grades K-8 and 7-12 certification.

503. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

This course is a study of human growth and development across the lifespan. Major theories of development will be explored as well as the factors that may affect development. Relevant counseling issues encountered at various points of development will also be explored.

504. THE EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT (3)

Overview of the disabled, the culturally diverse, and the gifted. Emphasis is on teaching diverse individuals in elementary, middle, and secondary school settings. Required by DESE for school counseling students with non-education bachelor's degree.

505. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELING (3)

Counseling children and adolescents requires knowledge and skills that are qualitatively different from those required for counseling adults. Assessment, diagnosis, etiology, of child and adolescent disorders will be reviewed within a developmental context and the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Therapeutic issues unique to children will be discussed. Effective interventions for children and adolescents will be demonstrated and practiced.

506. PSYCHODIAGNOSTICS (3)

This course is a study of adult and child psychopathology and behavioral disturbance in the context of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. (DSM) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. (ICD). Each major diagnostic category will be studied, emphasizing its definitions, etiology, assessment by symptom recognition and assessment instrument, and preferred treatment. An emphasis will be given to exploring appropriate interventions both from a therapeutic/research model. In addition, mental disorders will be examined from a cultural as well as a spiritual/religious model.

507. RESEARCH METHODS (3)

This course reviews basic behavioral science research methods and statistics then covers research methods and intermediate statistics applicable to counseling research. Topics include the philosophy of science, research ethics, research designs, data analysis, and basic program evaluation strategies.

508. MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATIONS (3)

This course is an introduction to professional issues in clinical mental health counseling. Topics include the history and philosophy of the counseling profession, the professional identity and role of the clinical mental health counselor, the public and private practice of mental health counseling as well as crisis intervention and general framework of consultation. Students will be challenged to consider the role of their Christian faith and life experiences as a foundation for a personal call to clinical mental health counseling.

509. SCHOOL COUNSELING FOUNDATIONS (3)

This course is an overview of the field of school counseling and the integral part it plays in the school curriculum. This course will examine the historical development of school counseling, the basic principles and functions of school counseling services and its relationship to the instructional program. Inherent in this study will be the underlying philosophical, psychological, and sociological principles undergirding school counseling theory.

512. PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS IN SCHOOL, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY (3)

Explores counseling techniques, current issues, trends, and problems in the education of special populations. Includes issues related to all areas of exceptionalities, including the gifted and at-risk populations. Includes communication skills with exceptional children and their families. Topics determined by current legislative initiatives and school trends.

521. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICS (3)

This course is an introduction to the field of counseling and focuses on the topics of ethics, professionalism, legal issues and responsibilities.

523. COUNSELING SKILLS (2)

Counseling skills are foundational to the application of counseling theory and intervention. Students will gain knowledge about evidenced based theoretical underpinnings of basic counseling skills and factors that influence the application of skills across clinical settings and diverse client populations.

523. COUNSELING SKILLS LAB (1)

Counseling skills are foundational to multiple counseling interventions. Counseling skills lab affords students experiential learning opportunities to practice and gain competency in the following skills: active listening, intake interviewing, crisis intervention, basic treatment planning and assessment. Role-plays and student/faculty immediate feedback will facilitate counselor self-awareness.

524. CLINICAL INTERVENTIONS AND EVIDENCE BASED TREATMENTS (3)

Contemporary approaches to assessment, treatment planning, and intervention based in bio-psycho-social systems and evidence-based interventions will be studied. Major areas of study for detailed treatment protocols will include mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance abuse and addictive disorders, eating disorders, personality disorders, and childhood disorders. Emphasis will be on multicultural and religious contexts in planning and conducting multi-faceted interventions for change. Diagnostic interviewing, crisis intervention, treatment planning, and conducting various types of assessments are discussed and practiced.

526. COUNSELING THEORIES (3)

This course is an examination of the major classical and contemporary theories of counseling and psychotherapy. It provides an overview and evaluation of major approaches practiced in the counseling field, including historical antecedents and significant theorists representing these approaches. Each theory is critically examined for its key theoretical constructs, personality formation, development of pathology, therapeutic processes that produce change/healing, the nature of the client-counselor or counselor-student relationship, and its effectiveness. Each theory is also evaluated from an ethnic and cultural and a Judeo-Christian perspective. The purpose of this examination is to move students toward a personal model of therapy that reflects and integrates the present research regarding points of convergence and their own philosophy of life or worldview.

527. COUPLE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

This course is a précis of the primary theories and approaches to counseling with couples and families. Classical as well as current marriage and family models will be examined. Emphasis is placed on sensitivity to the diverse forms of marriage and families in contemporary society and the development of a personal theory of an evidence-based marital counseling approach.

534. INTEGRATION OF CHRISTIANITY AND THE COUNSELING PROFESSION (2)

This course is designed to facilitate the student's integration of the Christian faith with professional counseling practice at the personal, theoretical, and pragmatic level. Students will engage in thoughtful discourse to integrate Christian theology with the practice of counseling. A theistic model for counseling will be explored in conjunction with spiritually focused interventions.

582. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (3)

Presents models of classroom management and related discipline issues. Research oriented with a focus on diversity of current American culture and classroom practice. Required by DESE for school counseling students with a non-education bachelor's degree.

590. SCHOOL COUNSELING PRACTICUM (3)

This course is designed to provide students with field-based counseling experiences within the school setting. The practical experiences enable students to transfer acquired knowledge into applied practice. The completion of the required hours includes guidance curriculum activities, individual planning, responsive services, and system support. Prerequisites: (unless individually waived by professor) COU 509, COU 521, COU 523, COU 582, COU 625

591. SCHOOL COUNSELING: INTERNSHIP - ELEMENTARY (3)

This course is designed to provide students with field-based counseling experiences within the school setting. The practical experiences enable students to transfer acquired knowledge into applied practice. The completion of the required hours includes guidance curriculum activities, individual planning, responsive services, and system support. Completion of COU 591 School Counseling: Internship-Elementary satisfies initial certification as an elementary counselor. PREREQUISITES: (unless individually waived by professor) COU 590 and Candidacy Approval.

592. SCHOOL COUNSELING INTERNSHIP - SECONDARY (3)

This course is designed to provide students with field-based counseling experiences within the school setting. The practical experiences enable students to transfer acquired knowledge into applied practice. The completion of the required hours includes guidance curriculum activities, individual planning, responsive services, and system support. PREREQUISITES: (unless individually waived by professor) COU 590 and Candidacy Approval.

595. PRACTICUM-INTERNATIONAL COUNSELING (1)

This course is the study and application of individual and group counseling skills in the context of an international and multicultural setting. Students will be exposed to counseling models shown to be effective for identified culture. In order to develop cross-cultural sensitivity, the country's national identity and cultural features will be examined. Students will attend weekly seminars prior to their travel and receive daily group and individual supervision during the trip. Diversity coursework prior to the class is preferred. This class does not meet the pre-requisites for starting internship or replace COU 597 Mental Health Counseling Practicum.

596. INTERNSHIP: INTERCULTURAL COUNSELING (1)

This practicum experience will provide counseling students an opportunity to learn, develop and apply counseling skills in a multi-cultural setting, primarily in an international context. Students will be exposed to counseling models shown to be effective in the identified culture and then apply skills in individual and group sessions. The country's national identity and cultural features will be examined to facilitate cross-cultural sensitivity. In preparation, students will attend weekly seminars prior to their travel and then receive group and individual supervision each day that services are provided. It is preferred that students have taken a diversity counseling class prior to this practicum. Prerequisites include COU 506, COU 526

597. MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING PRACTICUM (3)

This field-based course is designed to provide supervised counseling experiences for graduate students entering the field of clinical mental health counseling. Students will complete 100 hours of counseling related services, 40 of which must be direct service (i.e. individual, group, and relationship counseling). Students will attend weekly individual and triadic supervision sessions along with group practicum class. Prerequisites include COU 506, COU 526, COU 521 (B- or better) and COU 523 (B- or better).

598. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP (3)

This course is a multi-semester experience resulting in one credit for each of 100 hours of internship activity with a supervision seminar focusing on the integration of theory and practice. This weekly supervision seminar supplements the supervision students are receiving at their internship sites. The seminar is conducted using a clinical staffing format in which students present cases, and discuss therapeutic, diagnostic, ethical, faith integration, and treatment-planning issues encountered at their internship site. Didactic instruction occurs on an as-needed basis relevant to the issues presented by students. The seminar instructor maintains contact with the interns' site supervisor throughout the year. Six total credit hours are required for the degree which should correspond to 600 hours (240 must be direct [face-face] client therapy contact) of supervised counseling services. Prerequisites: COU 506,521, 526, and admission to Candidacy.

599. FIELD CONTINUANCE (0)

This course is designed to facilitate a student's continuation of internship hours required for the program. Must have program coordinator's permission to enroll.

604. CAREER COUNSELING (3)

This course is an advanced investigation of the theoretical framework for career education. Students will apply counseling skills and tools to assist individuals with career development. The course will present major theories of career development, introduce sources of occupational information, and introduce principles of assessment in career counseling. In addition, career decision making will be explored through the lens of multiculturalism, gender, age, and lifestyle.

610. ASSESSMENT (3)

This course is an overview of assessment procedures commonly used in counseling. This include a review of historical basis for assessment, test statistics, cultural factors related to assessment, test selection, ethical considerations, and the relationship of assessment procedures to diagnosis and treatment.

611. INTELLIGENCE TESTING (3)

Provides supervised practice and training in the administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of individual intelligence testing in school settings, specifically the Weschler Individual Assessment and the Stanford Binet (SB-V). This course is an elective for school counselors but meets one requirement for the School Psychological Examiner's Certificate.

613. DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT (3)

Studies the administration, scoring, and interpretation of academic, social, emotional, and behavioral assessments used in diagnosing children and adolescents.

625. GROUP COUNSELING (2)

This course is an advanced level study of theory and practice of group counseling. Students will explore various theoretical approaches to group work including the basic principles of group dynamics, processes, developmental stages, member roles, and leadership tasks. Prerequisites: COU 523 Counseling Skills

625. GROUP COUNSELING LAB (1)

The lab course allows for experiential learning through group participation. Students will apply knowledge into the practice of group counseling by leading and facilitating group process. Additionally, students will utilize their experience as group participants to analyze group process and dynamics.

627. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY (3)

Focuses on counseling interventions when working with clients of diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. Topics include counseling special populations in regard to age, gender, sexual orientations, disabilities, and socio-economic status.

628. CRISIS, TRAUMA AND RECOVERY (3)

This is an advanced study of crisis and trauma and the ramifications for the victim and family system. Emphasis is placed on evidence based treatment modalities of crisis intervention and trauma recovery. Special emphasis will be placed on practical skills of intervention as well as developing and implementing an effective therapeutic treatment approach. Cultural implications and existential issues will be of special interest.

632. PSYCHOLOGY OF EDUCATION (3)

Designed for educators and counselors as practitioners in school settings. Applies psychology to teaching with emphasis on research, theories, and practical applications relating to contemporary issues.

651. ADDICTION COUNSELING (3)

This course will provide an introduction to the multiple etiologies of addiction development. Further assessment, intervention, and relapse prevention for chemical and behavioral addictions will be examined. This course places special emphasis on understanding, assessing and treating addictive behaviors within a systems context of family, friends, community, and culture. Additional discussion will include the role of a Christian worldview as influenced on the topic of addiction.

675. HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)

This course explores human sexuality from an integrated psychological, physiological, sociological, and theological perspective. The course provides the student with an overview of human dynamics including psycho-sexual development, human reproduction, sexual identity, and sexual disorders. A variety of perspectives regarding appropriate expression will be considered in light of scriptural principles.

695. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGICAL EXAMINER PRACTICUM (3)

Provides field experiences in public school settings as diagnosticians. As diagnosticians in training, students assess children and adolescents, participate in diagnostic teams, and assist in determining educational needs. Practicum students are supervised by a certified School Psychological Examiner or a School Psychologist as well as a university professor. PREREQUISITES: COU 610, COU 611 and COU 613.

696. COUNSELING PROFESSIONAL CAPSTONE (1)

A Professional Practice Seminar designed to provide students with a forum to acquire information related to developing and maintaining a professional practice. Although a schedule of topics has been planned based on common issues and previous experience, student input will be welcome to create meaningful learning experiences.